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Author Topic: Do Orthodox Euchologies require following certain Old Testament food rules?  (Read 2024 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: November 10, 2010, 05:59:32 PM »

Acts 15:19-21 (King James Version) quotes the decision of the Council of Jerusalem, the Apostolic Decree:

Quote
19Wherefore my sentence is, that we trouble not them, which from among the Gentiles are turned to God:

 20But that we write unto them, that they abstain from pollutions of idols, and from fornication, and from things strangled, and from blood.

 21For Moses of old time hath in every city them that preach him, being read in the synagogues every sabbath day.

Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_as_food) says:

Quote
In the New Testament, blood was forbidden by the Apostolic Decree (Acts 15:19-21) and is still forbidden among Greek Orthodox[5].
Quote
Karl Josef von Hefele's commentary on canon II of Gangra "NPNF2-14. The Seven Ecumenical Councils". http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf214.viii.v.iv.ii.html. Retrieved 11 October 2010.  notes: "We further see that, at the time of the Synod of Gangra, the rule of the Apostolic Synod with regard to blood and things strangled was still in force. With the Greeks, indeed, it continued always in force as their Euchologies still show. Balsamon also, the well-known commentator on the canons of the Middle Ages, in his commentary on the sixty-third Apostolic Canon, expressly blames the Latins because they had ceased to observe this command.


Are these rules still in force among us Orthodox, and where can we read about them?

Polish Americans have duck-blood soup, called "czarnina." It tastes ok.
Belarusians also have a bloody sausage called kishka.
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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2010, 06:12:39 PM »

Here in Romania, one of the products of the annual village hog slaughter is black pudding, and I've not heard the Church ever complain. You'll pry sângerete from my cold, dead hands. :-)

Similarly, in Finland it's not unusual to see the black pudding called mustamakkara at large Orthodox events.
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« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2010, 06:25:02 PM »

Some Orthodox have four wives, don't fast at all, charge interest, take bribes, don't even go to church...so the argument that because some Orthodox do it (or even all, God forbid) and there's an injunction against such behavior does not make it right or mean that the injunction no longer exists.
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« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2010, 07:15:48 PM »

Some Orthodox have four wives, don't fast at all, charge interest, take bribes, don't even go to church...so the argument that because some Orthodox do it (or even all, God forbid) and there's an injunction against such behavior does not make it right or mean that the injunction no longer exists.

Exactly. We can find churches that have Halloween parties for little kids. It doesn't mean the practice is Noahide kosher, or that Noahide kosher is meaningless.

If Greeks lack such foods, that would suggest the blood foods in slavic countries are of pagan origin.
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« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2010, 05:27:08 AM »

We have a blood sausage called 'morcela'.  Is it forbidden?  If so, I have no choice but to give it up.  Cry
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« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2010, 06:10:23 AM »

Similarly, in Finland it's not unusual to see the black pudding called mustamakkara at large Orthodox events.

Well, this wouldn't be the first time when we deviate from the traditional practice...
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« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2010, 09:44:07 AM »

There are canons against consuming blood (I can't cite the specific one off hand: I just know I had to look this up one time on a question. I wouldn't come near the stuff). It gets mentioned in patristics.
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« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2010, 10:00:54 AM »

What's OO and Assyrian stance on the issue? RC's accept it but what about the other traditional churches?
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« Reply #8 on: November 11, 2010, 10:07:40 AM »

There are canons against consuming blood (I can't cite the specific one off hand: I just know I had to look this up one time on a question. I wouldn't come near the stuff). It gets mentioned in patristics.

Ialmisry,

That's what I am talking about- would you be able to show where I can read this?

It would make a big difference, because as you see, there are common Belarusian, Romanian, Finnish, and Bulgarian blood dishes.
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« Reply #9 on: November 11, 2010, 10:13:28 AM »

Some Orthodox have four wives, don't fast at all, charge interest, take bribes, don't even go to church...so the argument that because some Orthodox do it (or even all, God forbid) and there's an injunction against such behavior does not make it right or mean that the injunction no longer exists.

Exactly. We can find churches that have Halloween parties for little kids. It doesn't mean the practice is Noahide kosher, or that Noahide kosher is meaningless.

If Greeks lack such foods, that would suggest the blood foods in slavic countries are of pagan origin.

Why would you make such a conclusion about the Greeks and the Slavs? The Greeks had pagan origins as well. Perhaps the warmer climates of the Greek lands had something to do with the practice? The Greeks partake of lamb on Pascha, the Slavs had nothing to do with lamb. So what?

I grew up in a Slavic background family and we never had any blood pudding or the like. I do recall that my grandfather liked 'head cheese' and I think that is a blood product????but my grandmother and father thought it was gross!

I would again urge that we ought to worry less about the minutiae of what we or our neighbors may eat or drink and more about how we live and treat our neighbors and family with love, patience and grace. Anyone can read the Rudder and other sources and fall into a deep dilemma about one thing or another. "Sola patristics" is definitely not an Orthodox belief or practice. Like I always say, if your conscience is troubled, consult your spiritual advisor.
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« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2010, 11:30:08 AM »

Such a canon would be another example of a little known continuation between the 1st century church of Jerusalem and the Orthodox Church today, another indication of what is called the "best-kept secret of Orthodoxy."

Please, would you be able to find the canon or euchology that bans blood foods?

Thanks.
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« Reply #11 on: November 11, 2010, 12:40:35 PM »

Such a canon would be another example of a little known continuation between the 1st century church of Jerusalem and the Orthodox Church today, another indication of what is called the "best-kept secret of Orthodoxy."

Please, would you be able to find the canon or euchology that bans blood foods?

Thanks.


Canon 67 of the Quinisext council:

The divine Scripture commands us to abstain from blood, from things strangled, and from fornication. Those therefore who on account of a dainty stomach prepare by any art for food the blood of any animal, and so eat it, we punish suitably. If anyone henceforth venture to eat in any way the blood of an animal, if he be a clergyman, let him be deposed; if a layman, let him be cut off.

http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3814.htm
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« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2010, 01:25:22 PM »

Some Orthodox have four wives, don't fast at all, charge interest, take bribes, don't even go to church...so the argument that because some Orthodox do it (or even all, God forbid) and there's an injunction against such behavior does not make it right or mean that the injunction no longer exists.

If some Orthodox do such things, they do it in spite of Church teaching. The Church does not shy away from regularly condemning polygamy (good luck finding someone to marry you three more times), insufficient fasting and shirking from church. However, the preparation of black pudding is done in the view of, and with the blessing of the Church. Village hog slayings here often have the priest on hand to say a prayer, and the blood is drained away and kept separately to make black pudding as he's standing there.

Figures in the Church have on various occasions reverted to Jewish belief in ritual purity. These might have ended up in a canon somewhere or another, but they don't form any lasting part of Orthodox belief and practice.

Anyway, as God commanded St. Peter in Acts as He showed him all the things previously forbidden: "Kill and eat".
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« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2010, 01:45:25 PM »

Blood dishes are shrinking; growing up, my grand-parents would mention it when we slaughtered the pig before Christmas, but never made it. I ate some though from some relatives. I still prefer the "sangereti" without actual blood.
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« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2010, 05:30:59 PM »


Thanks Alpo, for pointing to the 7th century Council of Trullo.

The one researcher's claim was that Western Christianity had this rule, but don't anymore (because of disuse, perhaps?)

The researcher also pointed to an 8th century statement of Pope Gregory, but then says that the "Greeks' " euchologies "still" show the rule. (As opposed to post-8th century Western canons that don't?)

Is there a more recent canon than the Council of Trullo that would show that the Greeks "still" have the rule?

Thanks!
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« Reply #15 on: November 11, 2010, 05:39:21 PM »

Blood dishes are shrinking...
Not in my culture.  We slaughter our own hogs, and make our own pork and blood sausage.  Additionally, blood sausage is sold at our local stores and butcher shops .  It sells very well.
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« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2011, 11:41:19 AM »

CRCulver:

Thanks for sharing that:
Here in Romania, one of the products of the annual village hog slaughter is black pudding, and I've not heard the Church ever complain. You'll pry sângerete from my cold, dead hands. :-)

Similarly, in Finland it's not unusual to see the black pudding called mustamakkara at large Orthodox events.

I'm surprised to hear you describe blood pudding as so good. What does it taste like? The name Sangerete sounds like a word for blood, like there is I think a similar root in the word "sanguine."

So eating blood foods is common among the Romanian and Finnish Orthodox communities, suggesting that the canons about blood foods are in disuse there.

I believe you when you write:
Quote
If some Orthodox do such things, they do it in spite of Church teaching. The Church does not shy away from regularly condemning polygamy (good luck finding someone to marry you three more times), insufficient fasting and shirking from church. However, the preparation of black pudding is done in the view of, and with the blessing of the Church. Village hog slayings here often have the priest on hand to say a prayer, and the blood is drained away and kept separately to make black pudding as he's standing there.

I am not sure what you mean by ritual purity here when you say: "Figures in the Church have on various occasions reverted to Jewish belief in ritual purity". If by that you include rules against touching sick people, then I highly doubt it, because Jesus himself touched sick people to heal them, as did some apostles I somewhat remember.

So I doubt that "These might have ended up in a canon somewhere or another", and so if they did it seems you could be right that "they don't form any lasting part of Orthodox belief and practice."

You commented: "Anyway, as God commanded St. Peter in Acts as He showed him all the things previously forbidden: "Kill and eat"."

It seems to me that this could just apply to kinds of animals. As I remember vaguely the vision was of the animals themselves, not certain blood foods. So this vision could have allowed Peter, as a Jew, to avoid the specifically Jewish kosher rules discussed in the Council of Jerusalem, while still keeping in place the preparation rules against eating strangled animals and about blood foods that were mentioned at the Council of Jerusalem. That the Canons as well as St Augustine mentioned the rule against blood foods suggests to meal that such a rule wasn't included in Peter's vision.

Regards


Shanghaiski,

Your picture is pretty.

It makes sense when you say:
Quote
Some Orthodox have four wives, don't fast at all, charge interest, take bribes, don't even go to church...so the argument that because some Orthodox do it (or even all, God forbid) and there's an injunction against such behavior does not make it right or mean that the injunction no longer exists

One problem is that Fr. George wrote on
http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php?topic=32071.0;wap2
that some canons became voluntary because they fell into disuse. So in fact the argument that some Orthodox do it (or even all, God forbid) could mean that the injunction no longer exists and make it at least ok.

One reason why the examples you gave don't apply is that Scripture goes against them and is treated with high deference. On the other hand, Scripture also goes against Christians eating blood foods.

So it sounds like the situation with blood foods is that scriptures opposes them, the canons oppose them but have fallen into disuse, and that Christians eat blood foods despite the Scripture to the contrary.

Peace



Agia Marina

You commented: "We have a blood sausage called 'morcela'.  Is it forbidden?  If so, I have no choice but to give it up.  Cry " The sad smiley face here is cute. It seems like you would have to give it up, at least in order to conform to the Scriptural customs.

One counterargument could be that either:
(A) as with women wearing veils in church, the prohibition on eating blood foods is customary, or that
(B) the blood food rule is part of Moses' Law, which puts it in the category of law, like observance of the Sabbath. I think that in Orthodoxy there is at least some recommendation to keep the sabbath, but I'm not sure why it isn't usually treated with significant importance, except that in practice Sunday is enough as a day of rest for people who don't observe the Sabbath.

It seems that there is in Christianity an attitude that rules about wearing veils, Saturday observance, and now apparently blood food, are more customary, rather than strong doctrines.

So also Bulgaria's Orthodox Christians have a national blood food, morcela.

I believe you that "We slaughter our own hogs, and make our own pork and blood sausage.  Additionally, blood sausage is sold at our local stores and butcher shops .  It sells very well"

You could be right when you responded to the claim that "blood dishes are shrinking" by saying:
Quote
Not in my culture.

But on the other hand, it could be that the Bulgarian community doesn't eat it on the same scale that it did 100 years ago. In such a case, it could be possible that it sells very well at local stores and shops where you are in America, but that not as many stores sell it in America as before, since the Bulgarian community could be smaller and more Westernized than in te past.

On the other hand, there are more higs and more Bulgarians than 200 years ago, so you could still be right. Smiley

Health to you



Ialmisry:

You're right when you comment: There are canons against consuming blood (I can't cite the specific one off hand: I just know I had to look this up one time on a question. I wouldn't come near the stuff). It gets mentioned in patristics.

I had Polish duck blood soup once. It was okay. The Canons of the Holy Apostles mention the blood food rule, as does St Gregory. However, I don't know of anyone who mentions it later than he.

One claim could be that if other Orthodox writers don't mention it, that it's fallen into disuse as a practice of our Church. But on the other hand, the claim seems possible that its falling into disuse violates the Church's own principles.



Alpo:

You asked: What's OO and Assyrian stance on the issue? I don't know, but at least the rule is part of our scriptures, which we share with them.

You asked: "RC's accept it but what about the other traditional churches?"

I think Protestants don't care about it, and Scotland, which is part Protestant, has a national food called Haggis.

The commentator Karl Josef von Hefele, cited on Wikipedia, commented:
"the fact that its decree has been obsolete for centuries in the West is proof that even Ecumenical canons may be of only temporary utility and may be repealed by disuse, like other laws."

This comment suggests that the view in Western Christianity-Catholic and Protestant- is that the rule doesn't matter anymore.

However, Roman Catholicism is somewhat legalistic, and the Orthodox Church does have respect for its canons and Councils so I somewhat doubt about whether simply disusing an Ecumenical decision or canon over time actually repeals it.

Thanks for posting Canon 67 of the Quinisext council, 692 AD:

Quote
The divine Scripture commands us to abstain from blood, from things strangled, and from fornication. Those therefore who on account of a dainty stomach prepare by any art for food the blood of any animal, and so eat it, we punish suitably. If anyone henceforth venture to eat in any way the blood of an animal, if he be a clergyman, let him be deposed; if a layman, let him be cut off.

So here we have the Canon on one hand from over a millenium ago, and a contrary occasional folk practice among Orthodox today, whereby those in breach of the Canon aren't excommunicated. It seems like this would mean the Canon has been repealed by disuse, since Fr. George elsewhere suggested that some Canons could be seen as irrelevant to today if they fell into disuse, although I'm not certain that such a kind of repeal happens in Orthodoxy.

Regards.



Podkarpatska,

I wrote: If Greeks lack such foods, that would suggest the blood foods in slavic countries are of pagan origin.

And You asked: "Why would you make such a conclusion about the Greeks and the Slavs? The Greeks had pagan origins as well."

You're right that both Greeks and Slavs had pagan origins. I don't remember exactly why I concluded this. But perhaps I concluded this thinking:
Greece lacks blood foods, but Slavic countries have them. So why would the Slavic countries have them if Orthodoxy goes against it? They wouldn't have taken such a national food from Greek culture, since Greek culture lacks it. Slavic countries also probably didn't develop blood foods after they became Orthodox, because Orthodoxy would go against them making a new invention like that. In other words, if it didn't exist in Slavic countries by the time it was Orthodox, they wouldn't have invented it afterwards, because starting a folk-food like that would be hard due to their Orthodoxy. The conclusion is that the food neither came from Orthodox Greece, which lacked blood foods, nor would it come from the Christian West, where blood foods are relatively rare. Also, the cultural contacts with Asian countries were weaker than with Christian and Muslim countries,and I doubt that blood foods are common in Muslim and Asian cultures. Therefore, the conclusion from the above is a suggestion that such a food would have existed in pre-Christian Slavic countries, at which time they were pagan.

You asked "Perhaps the warmer climates of the Greek lands had something to do with the practice?" I guess it could, but I'm not sure how. Like I guess people in warmer climates could like the taste of blood foods less, but I'm not sure why.

You commented:
Quote
"The Greeks partake of lamb on Pascha, the Slavs had nothing to do with lamb. So what?"
So to me it suggests some possible implications. The difference about eating lamb could suggest that lambs and sheep are more common in Greek culture than in slavic cultures. And this idea suggests to me that your statement could be incorrect. In Bulgaria for example, the cuisine includes lamb. So it seems that traditional Bulgarian Pascha meals could include lamb.

Another possible implication is the possibility that Greek culture took the custom of eating lamb at Pascha from an earlier Christian custom of eating it at Pascha, since it's common among Palestinian Christians at Pascha, and that they in turn took the custom from the fact that Jewish Passover meals included lamb. Part of this implication would be a possible explanation that slavic nations didn't include lamb in their Pascha because they came to Orthodox Christianity at a date much later than Greeks did, at which point eating lamb in particular then seemed even less important.

It's funny when you write:
Quote
I grew up in a Slavic background family and we never had any blood pudding or the like. I do recall that my grandfather liked 'head cheese' and I think that is a blood product????but my grandmother and father thought it was gross!
As in "Yum, blood cheese." Smiley

Well, it sounds like whatever slavic background he had included blood foods.

You are right that
Quote
"I would again urge that we ought to worry less about the minutiae of what we or our neighbors may eat or drink and more about how we live and treat our neighbors and family with love, patience and grace... Like I always say, if your conscience is troubled, consult your spiritual advisor."

On the other hand, I don't know if " Anyone can read the Rudder and other sources and fall into a deep dilemma about one thing or another", since I don't think I ever read the Rudder, although I assume it can easily include sources that imply things that could cause a mental dilemma, like say, the dilemma in the concept of ekonomia.

It's true that ""Sola patristics" is definitely not an Orthodox belief or practice" -by which you bring up the Prpotestant idea of "sola scriptura, because in Orthodoxy we use both scripture and tradition as authority.

Health to you



Augustin717,

I would assume you're right that:
Quote
Blood dishes are shrinking; growing up, my grand-parents would mention it when we slaughtered the pig before Christmas, but never made it. I ate some though from some relatives. I still prefer the "sangereti" without actual blood.

I've never tried sagereti, but I tried a Polish blood sausage called kishka and preferred another version of kishka that wasn't made with the blood. The blood one was dark brown like clotted blood, while the other was pink like ham.

I assume you're right that they're shrinking because they seem more like a folk dish rather than a modern one, and eastern Europe is becoming more Westernized and modernized.

Regards
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« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2011, 12:53:40 PM »

It is one of the numerous rules of the Church that have simply fallen into disuse for no obvious reason. Abstaining from blood is part of Noahide, Mosaic, New Testament, and Church Canon Law. It's applicable for everyone, but few know, and fewer observe it.
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« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2011, 12:58:51 PM »

It is one of the numerous rules of the Church that have simply fallen into disuse for no obvious reason. Abstaining from blood is part of Noahide, Mosaic, New Testament, and Church Canon Law. It's applicable for everyone, but few know, and fewer observe it.
It's still fully observed in the Middle East.  I'd write more, but I just ate.
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« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2011, 04:15:09 PM »

It is one of the numerous rules of the Church that have simply fallen into disuse for no obvious reason. Abstaining from blood is part of Noahide, Mosaic, New Testament, and Church Canon Law. It's applicable for everyone, but few know, and fewer observe it.
It's still fully observed in the Middle East.  I'd write more, but I just ate.

Well, you proved it. It sounds like it's still in force and that Orthodox in Europe simply disregarded it to different degrees on a folk-level. Something more about the heritage in the Middle East to add to my blog (rakovskii.livejournal.com). Smiley
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« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2011, 04:31:20 PM »


So, I get that consuming "blood" is out.

If I eat steak, I make sure it's not rare. If I am eating out and there's blood oozing out of my steak, I send it back.  I always ask for med/well.

However, even though it's "cooked" and the blood is not pouring out onto my plate, the blood is still there.

How is this different with these blood sausages?  Aren't they cooked?  I honestly don't know.  I've seen them at the deli, but, know nothing really about them.

If it's cooked, how is it different from a well prepared steak. 

If it's cooked and not allowed, than I would assume that the steak would also not be permitted.

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« Reply #21 on: March 17, 2011, 05:05:52 PM »


So, I get that consuming "blood" is out.

If I eat steak, I make sure it's not rare. If I am eating out and there's blood oozing out of my steak, I send it back.  I always ask for med/well.

However, even though it's "cooked" and the blood is not pouring out onto my plate, the blood is still there.

How is this different with these blood sausages?  Aren't they cooked?  I honestly don't know.  I've seen them at the deli, but, know nothing really about them.

If it's cooked, how is it different from a well prepared steak. 

If it's cooked and not allowed, than I would assume that the steak would also not be permitted.

If your steak is from a properly butchered animal the red juice is not blood, but myoglobin.  If it were blood, no amount of cooking would change that.  You can eat your steak raw if you want.

"Myoglobin forms pigments responsible for making meat red. The color that meat takes is partly determined by the oxidation states of the iron atom in myoglobin and the oxygen species attached to it. When meat is in its raw state, the iron atom is in the +2 oxidation state, and is bound to a dioxygen molecule (O2). Meat cooked well done is brown because the iron atom is now in the +3 oxidation state, having lost an electron, and is now coordinated by a water molecule."  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myoglobin
« Last Edit: March 17, 2011, 05:16:44 PM by KBN1 » Logged
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« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2011, 05:41:43 PM »


So, I get that consuming "blood" is out.

If I eat steak, I make sure it's not rare. If I am eating out and there's blood oozing out of my steak, I send it back.  I always ask for med/well.

However, even though it's "cooked" and the blood is not pouring out onto my plate, the blood is still there.

How is this different with these blood sausages?  Aren't they cooked?  I honestly don't know.  I've seen them at the deli, but, know nothing really about them.

If it's cooked, how is it different from a well prepared steak.  

If it's cooked and not allowed, than I would assume that the steak would also not be permitted.

Besides what the red stuff is, as posted above, it is, since we are not Pharisees, a matter of degree.  Like fasting: a can labeled "Chicken Soup" is out, even though it may be noting more than chicken bouillion, but a can of "Vegetable Soup" is fine, even if you were to read the fourtieth ingredient (and as Bsihop Kallistos IIRC stated, if you read past the third ingredient, it's no longer Christian fasting) that porc shortening is in the dumplings. On these issues, we follow St. Paul (I Corinthians 8 ).
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« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2011, 05:57:14 PM »

If your steak is from a properly butchered animal the red juice is not blood, but myoglobin.  If it were blood, no amount of cooking would change that.  You can eat your steak raw if you want.

"Myoglobin forms pigments responsible for making meat red. The color that meat takes is partly determined by the oxidation states of the iron atom in myoglobin and the oxygen species attached to it. When meat is in its raw state, the iron atom is in the +2 oxidation state, and is bound to a dioxygen molecule (O2). Meat cooked well done is brown because the iron atom is now in the +3 oxidation state, having lost an electron, and is now coordinated by a water molecule."  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myoglobin

Seriously?  I didn't know that.  I  was sure it was blood.  Go figure. 
You go to college for so many years, and nobody teaches you the really important stuff!
Wink

Thanks for the info.  So, now that pink steak isn't off limits (after Pascha, of course!)
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« Reply #24 on: March 17, 2011, 06:48:25 PM »


So, I get that consuming "blood" is out.

If I eat steak, I make sure it's not rare. If I am eating out and there's blood oozing out of my steak, I send it back.  I always ask for med/well.

However, even though it's "cooked" and the blood is not pouring out onto my plate, the blood is still there.

How is this different with these blood sausages?  Aren't they cooked?  I honestly don't know.  I've seen them at the deli, but, know nothing really about them.

If it's cooked, how is it different from a well prepared steak. 

If it's cooked and not allowed, than I would assume that the steak would also not be permitted.

If your steak is from a properly butchered animal the red juice is not blood, but myoglobin.  If it were blood, no amount of cooking would change that.  You can eat your steak raw if you want.

"Myoglobin forms pigments responsible for making meat red. The color that meat takes is partly determined by the oxidation states of the iron atom in myoglobin and the oxygen species attached to it. When meat is in its raw state, the iron atom is in the +2 oxidation state, and is bound to a dioxygen molecule (O2). Meat cooked well done is brown because the iron atom is now in the +3 oxidation state, having lost an electron, and is now coordinated by a water molecule."  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myoglobin

Thank you for saving me the time.
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« Reply #25 on: March 17, 2011, 06:53:45 PM »

I highly recommend freshly ground steak formed in to small balls chock full of garlic gloves, onion, salt, and pepper. No cooking.

Delicious.

Heavy rye bread toasted, smeared with warm Griebenschmalz, and topped with freshly ground horseradish. Also highly recommended.

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« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2011, 06:56:19 PM »


So, I get that consuming "blood" is out.



I guess that is true, which puts a damper on some of the sausages (pudding) I enjoy. Learn this on St. Patrick's Day nonetheless . . .
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« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2011, 01:35:33 PM »

It is one of the numerous rules of the Church that have simply fallen into disuse for no obvious reason. Abstaining from blood is part of Noahide, Mosaic, New Testament, and Church Canon Law. It's applicable for everyone, but few know, and fewer observe it.
It's still fully observed in the Middle East.  I'd write more, but I just ate.

Please write more about its observance, since you digested. Smiley

It's interesting for me, since it shows the Middle Eastern Orthodoxs' connection to early Christianity.
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« Reply #28 on: September 05, 2011, 06:53:20 AM »

I just want to add that in the Roman Catholic church, the matter of eating blood was settled in an ecumenical council and not by just disregarding the old council. However, the eastern churches are not forced  to changing their ancient tradition.
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« Reply #29 on: April 10, 2012, 01:22:12 PM »

It is one of the numerous rules of the Church that have simply fallen into disuse for no obvious reason. Abstaining from blood is part of Noahide, Mosaic, New Testament, and Church Canon Law. It's applicable for everyone, but few know, and fewer observe it.
It's still fully observed in the Middle East.  I'd write more, but I just ate.

Ialmisry,
Can you please write more how you know it's still observed in the Middle East?
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« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2013, 06:33:12 PM »

It is one of the numerous rules of the Church that have simply fallen into disuse for no obvious reason. Abstaining from blood is part of Noahide, Mosaic, New Testament, and Church Canon Law. It's applicable for everyone, but few know, and fewer observe it.
It's still fully observed in the Middle East.  I'd write more, but I just ate.

Ialmisry,
Can you please write more how you know it's still observed in the Middle East?

It seems your question has remained unanswered. I've created a thread about the Old Testament rules in OO Churches. http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,49202.msg864094.html#new 
Maybe you'll find there what you're searching.

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