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Author Topic: Roman Catholic Churches  (Read 29471 times) Average Rating: 0
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ChristusDominus
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« Reply #135 on: November 06, 2010, 02:10:16 PM »

Do you like these images?

No. Why should I?
So then why would you post them? . I am sure there are very nice churches in your country. I don't understand your motive.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2010, 02:25:14 PM by ChristusDominus » Logged

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« Reply #136 on: November 07, 2010, 03:48:00 PM »

The OP didn't ask to post pictures of Churches one likes. I find them interesting so I posted them. That's all.
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« Reply #137 on: November 07, 2010, 05:30:09 PM »

Just it's funny that someone cuts and pastes from Kronika Novus Ordo, the Polish Novus Ordo Watch.

This is a Roman Catholic Church in Michał Kalina's hometown built between 1991 and 1996.




Churches at the border of Christendom
The cathedral in Kamieniec Podolski, Kamyanets Podolshkyy Ukraine




Please, remember that the church was built by Martians who lived in Ukraine for hundreds of years.

Czortków, Podole now Chortkiv, Ukraine

In the thread former Roman Catholic churches, stolen by Orthodox

On Polish web sites, it is called the Jesuit church while on Ukrainian sites it is called a monastery of the Orthodox church.

One of the hundreds of Roman Catholic monasteries "canceled" (kasowane) by the Tsars.
The monastery of st,Catherine of Alexandria


Edit: fixed img tags, nothing more -Schultz.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2010, 05:46:44 PM by Schultz » Logged
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« Reply #138 on: November 07, 2010, 05:52:52 PM »

I took some pictures yesterday of the Catholic Basilica in my city. The Basilica of St. Adalbert in Grand Rapids was built in 1907 and my great-grandparents helped build it along with many other poor Polish families. They recently redid the domes of the church which have been green for ages and will soon turn that way again so I wanted to take some pictures as a remembrance that I got to see it the same way my great-grandparents did. It is a very beautiful church.

















« Last Edit: November 07, 2010, 05:55:04 PM by Andrew21091 » Logged
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« Reply #139 on: November 07, 2010, 06:04:47 PM »

Just it's funny that someone cuts and pastes from Kronika Novus Ordo, the Polish Novus Ordo Watch.

This is a Roman Catholic Church in Michał Kalina's hometown built between 1991 and 1996.

Churches at the border of Christendom
The cathedral in Kamieniec Podolski, Kamyanets Podolshkyy Ukraine


Please, remember that the church was built by Martians who lived in Ukraine for hundreds of years.

Czortków, Podole now Chortkiv, Ukraine

In the thread former Roman Catholic churches, stolen by Orthodox

On Polish web sites, it is called the Jesuit church while on Ukrainian sites it is called a monastery of the Orthodox church.

One of the hundreds of Roman Catholic monasteries "canceled" (kasowane) by the Tsars.
The monastery of st,Catherine of Alexandria
http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,31115.msg490934/topicseen.html#msg490934
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ChristusDominus
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Saint Aloysius Gonzaga


« Reply #140 on: November 09, 2010, 01:18:34 AM »

Yes,a very humble and simple church in appearance. I wonder what it dates back to?
« Last Edit: November 09, 2010, 01:19:13 AM by ChristusDominus » Logged

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« Reply #141 on: November 10, 2010, 09:11:05 AM »


The Lady Church in Kraków one of my most favorite churches..
Note, the box at the side with the sign, is for petitions to St.Jude Thaddeus. Somethings are universal in the Catholic world.
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« Reply #142 on: November 12, 2010, 11:29:47 AM »

Hi everyone, and God bless.

This is my first post in here so I thought I'd share an image of the largest RC church in my city:

http://www.dxn.ro/millenium_church_QT.html

(it's one of those 3d things, you need Apple QuickTime I think)
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« Reply #143 on: November 16, 2010, 11:08:42 PM »

One I took this weekend

http://www.flickr.com/photos/24557771@N02/5178974879/

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Saint Aloysius Gonzaga


« Reply #144 on: November 17, 2010, 01:09:22 AM »

I took some pictures yesterday of the Catholic Basilica in my city. The Basilica of St. Adalbert in Grand Rapids was built in 1907 and my great-grandparents helped build it along with many other poor Polish families. They recently redid the domes of the church which have been green for ages and will soon turn that way again so I wanted to take some pictures as a remembrance that I got to see it the same way my great-grandparents did. It is a very beautiful church.
















Very nice.
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« Reply #145 on: November 17, 2010, 11:41:55 PM »

The Basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Boston, Massachusetts









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ChristusDominus
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Saint Aloysius Gonzaga


« Reply #146 on: November 18, 2010, 01:33:33 AM »

The Basilica of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Boston, Massachusetts










Bello, bello (beautiful)
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« Reply #147 on: April 03, 2011, 01:58:06 PM »



I'm not crazy about the steeples/cupola, but I think everything below the (upper) roof is beautiful...
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« Reply #148 on: April 04, 2011, 04:18:01 AM »

I visited this parish yesterday... the pic doesn't do it justice though...

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« Reply #149 on: April 04, 2011, 11:58:08 AM »

I visited this parish yesterday... the pic doesn't do it justice though...


How was the inside of the Church?
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« Reply #150 on: April 04, 2011, 12:19:03 PM »

How was the inside of the Church?

Some observations about the interior that I remember...

- The lights hanging from the ceiling were in the shape of + style crosses (maybe 3' x 3'), but they were hidden and the lights were pointed upward, so you didn't actually see the bulbs, only cross-like things. There was plenty of light though.

- There is a giant circular window behind the altar, similar to the one that can be seen in the picture

- On the dais was a chair for the priest to sit on on the right, a rather minimalistic altar in the middle, and a podium for doing readings/singing on the left.

- For holy water there was a continuously running/recirculating fountain at the back of the nave

- There were lots of pews, and some chairs, most running in the normal manner, but with some pews up front running from the front wall towards the direction of the main group of pews. The spaces between the pews were a bit close, but not uncomfortably so.

- There were windows along the sides of the Church, but not stained glass. The roof was slanted leading towards the windows, with the space opening for the windows being in a wedge or pie like shape, which was architecturally interesting

- There were things (I don't recall what) in between the windows on the sides, so that the Church did not seem as bare

- There was a crucifix behind the altar, below the window

- They had a bell choir at the beginning and towards the end doing some music

- While I like the domes of Orthodox Churches, the roof was fine looking

- Built in 1999, the parish was quite clean and modern looking (I've seen parishes much more minimalistic, and also more ornate)

- The vestibule was rather large, though didn't have a place to put my coat (argh!)  Maybe they had a cloakroom somewhere, though other people in the church also had jackets on

Overall a nice parish, I think Smiley
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« Reply #151 on: May 04, 2011, 02:52:26 AM »

St. Stephen's, Cleveland, Ohio











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« Reply #152 on: May 04, 2011, 05:12:17 AM »

St.Vitus cathedral in Praha, Ceska Republika (Prague Czech Republic) under Czech government occupation


Czech Nepomuk- statue of the death of St.John Nepomucene by St.Vit's cathedral in Praha

Altar of St.John Nepomucene in Prague cathedral

Nepomucene statue in Wrocław, on the Ostrów Tumski

Nepomucen in Kielce,Poland

Nepomucen in Piotrków, Poland

Nepomucen in Bodzentyn, Poland

Nepomucene in Olomouc, Czechia

St.John Nepomucene is the patron saint of good confession, protector against floods, and protector of honor and virginity.
St.John Nepomucen died defending the seal of confession. His devotion was popular in Central Europe, although now few people upkeep devotion to him.
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« Reply #153 on: May 04, 2011, 10:32:34 AM »

St. Stephen's, Cleveland, Ohio




Wow. What was the ethnicity of the builders of this Church?
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« Reply #154 on: May 04, 2011, 10:40:54 AM »

St. Stephen's, Cleveland, Ohio




Wow. What was the ethnicity of the builders of this Church?


Quote
Early history:

St. Stephen Parish arose from a division necessitated by the increases at St. Mary Parish, formerly located on W. 30th St. St. Mary’s Parish is no longer in existence. In April of 1869, Rt. Rev. Amadeus Rappe, first bishop of Cleveland, commissioned Father Stephen Falk to establish a two-story building which would service both church and school for German-speaking Catholics living west of W. 44th St. The newly ordained Father Casimir Reichlin was appointed the first pasture and celebrated the first mass in the new building on May 1, 1870. At that time to Parish consists of about 200 families. The Parish prospered, and so the larger church was needed. In 1873 the present structure was begun by the architectural firm Cudell and Richardson. Parishioners mortgage their own properties in order to raise the needed funds. On November 20, 1881, Rt. Rev. Richard Gilmour: second bishop of Cleveland, dedicated St. Stephen church; the interior had been completed just one week previously. On the day of its dedication, St. Stephen church stood as one of the most elegant and substantial church edifices in the city. Built entirely of stone, mainly of the best Amherst, the church is 165 ft. long and 74 ft. wide, the side walls are 40 ft. high. The style is Gothic, in the shape of the Cross. The church's interior is massive and sound the interior lentils give it a bright and airy feeling. Interior height from the floor to ceiling is 75 ft. On each side of the main aisle are six great tree-like pillars that branch out into numerous columns. The oak pews harmonize with wood carvings which dominate the high altar, siding alters, and pulpit. As the years passed, a Mexican onyx and brass communion rail were installed. Basket-weave marble tiles were installed in the sanctuary floor and aisles. The church building his many artistic treasures, some of them are described below:
source
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« Reply #155 on: May 04, 2011, 10:54:58 AM »

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Kansas City, MO.

Pre-Vatican II Iconoclasm:



What is there today:



After lengthy renovations completed in 2003, here we have the new cathedral, where the altar is placed in the center of the nave with pews facing from each direction. I was going to go and visit this cathedral this week until I saw pictures of the interior. It seems so wrong!
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« Reply #156 on: May 04, 2011, 11:07:13 AM »

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Kansas City, MO.

Pre-Vatican II Iconoclasm:



What there is today:



After lengthy renovations completed in 2003, here we have the new cathedral, where the altar is placed in the center of the nave with pews facing from each direction. I was going to go and visit this cathedral this week until I saw pictures of the interior. It seems so wrong!

I suspect that many of the faithful were not expressing a whole lot of love to their Bishop about this abomination. I hope that he isn't assigned to Chartres.
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« Reply #157 on: May 04, 2011, 11:12:24 AM »

What is there today:



That might be the best looking inside of a Church I've seen on the thread yet...  angel
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« Reply #158 on: May 04, 2011, 11:13:43 AM »

http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/content/diocese/bishop_emeritus/

Apparently this "Bishop Emeritus" is responsible. Can Roman Catholic bishops retire?

Also from the cathedral site:


"THE ALTAR
Like a dining room or kitchen table for a family, the altar should be more or less centrally located (to symbolize a welcome gathering around the table). For the first few centuries of the church's existence it was a simple free-standing table. In later centuries when the liturgy became a performance by the clergy, it moved physically away from the people to the rear wall. It was no longer a family table but a kind of stage. In those "middle times" the altar was oblong to allow the priest to proclaim two readings from Scripture from opposite ends and separate from the Eucharistic action in the center.

The Second Vatican Council led us back to the earlier practice of the church.

Our tables today are a variety of shapes. So altars may be. Since the sacred food (communion) is distributed as part of the action taking place the tabernacle (reservation) is removed and given another place of honor.

The altar should be beautiful and noble as befits the mystery being celebrated there. But it should be of a simplicity that can be seen as welcoming even to the most humble who might approach it."
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« Reply #159 on: May 04, 2011, 11:15:04 AM »

http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/content/diocese/bishop_emeritus/

Apparently this "Bishop Emeritus" is responsible. Can Roman Catholic bishops retire?

They can get fired as happened this past week in Australia, and as happened to a Byzantine Catholic Bishop in the 1960's. (although he reappeared after a period of re-education in Rome in the person
of a Latin Rite auxiliary Bishop.)
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« Reply #160 on: May 05, 2011, 01:43:02 AM »

St. Stephen's, Cleveland, Ohio




Wow. What was the ethnicity of the builders of this Church?

It's a magnificent German church. All that wood carving was done in a Munich workshop and shipped over. The stained glass was also done in Germany, at great cost. God bless those wonderful, sacrificing German immigrants who pinched pennies to pay for such a glorious house of God!

My favorite American Gothic churches tend to be the German ones and the ones built for French-speaking congregations (both from Quebec and France).
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« Reply #161 on: May 05, 2011, 01:49:19 AM »

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Kansas City, MO.

Pre-Vatican II Iconoclasm:



What is there today:



After lengthy renovations completed in 2003, here we have the new cathedral, where the altar is placed in the center of the nave with pews facing from each direction. I was going to go and visit this cathedral this week until I saw pictures of the interior. It seems so wrong!

Christ is Risen!

Before I converted I served in this Cathedral many times it's a beautiful church. and Alveus  it may have been intended for people to sit on either side when it was built but people rarely sit is the back that seating is mainly used when their are large liturgies with large numbers of con-celebrating priests 
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« Reply #162 on: May 05, 2011, 01:53:33 AM »

http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/content/diocese/bishop_emeritus/

Apparently this "Bishop Emeritus" is responsible. Can Roman Catholic bishops retire?

Also from the cathedral site:


"THE ALTAR
Like a dining room or kitchen table for a family, the altar should be more or less centrally located (to symbolize a welcome gathering around the table). For the first few centuries of the church's existence it was a simple free-standing table. In later centuries when the liturgy became a performance by the clergy, it moved physically away from the people to the rear wall. It was no longer a family table but a kind of stage. In those "middle times" the altar was oblong to allow the priest to proclaim two readings from Scripture from opposite ends and separate from the Eucharistic action in the center.

The Second Vatican Council led us back to the earlier practice of the church.

Our tables today are a variety of shapes. So altars may be. Since the sacred food (communion) is distributed as part of the action taking place the tabernacle (reservation) is removed and given another place of honor.

The altar should be beautiful and noble as befits the mystery being celebrated there. But it should be of a simplicity that can be seen as welcoming even to the most humble who might approach it."

Wow, that is horrible what he did to that cathedral. The ironic thing is that his successor, Bishop Robert Finn, is awesome, very much pro-tradition and rock-solid.
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« Reply #163 on: May 05, 2011, 11:14:49 AM »

http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/content/diocese/bishop_emeritus/

Apparently this "Bishop Emeritus" is responsible. Can Roman Catholic bishops retire?

Also from the cathedral site:


"THE ALTAR
Like a dining room or kitchen table for a family, the altar should be more or less centrally located (to symbolize a welcome gathering around the table). For the first few centuries of the church's existence it was a simple free-standing table. In later centuries when the liturgy became a performance by the clergy, it moved physically away from the people to the rear wall. It was no longer a family table but a kind of stage. In those "middle times" the altar was oblong to allow the priest to proclaim two readings from Scripture from opposite ends and separate from the Eucharistic action in the center.

The Second Vatican Council led us back to the earlier practice of the church.

Our tables today are a variety of shapes. So altars may be. Since the sacred food (communion) is distributed as part of the action taking place the tabernacle (reservation) is removed and given another place of honor.

The altar should be beautiful and noble as befits the mystery being celebrated there. But it should be of a simplicity that can be seen as welcoming even to the most humble who might approach it."

Wow, that is horrible what he did to that cathedral. The ironic thing is that his successor, Bishop Robert Finn, is awesome, very much pro-tradition and rock-solid.

The description you quoted is awful, the author sounds like a low-Church Protestant wannabe.
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« Reply #164 on: May 05, 2011, 02:05:59 PM »

http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/content/diocese/bishop_emeritus/

Apparently this "Bishop Emeritus" is responsible. Can Roman Catholic bishops retire?

Also from the cathedral site:


"THE ALTAR
Like a dining room or kitchen table for a family, the altar should be more or less centrally located (to symbolize a welcome gathering around the table). For the first few centuries of the church's existence it was a simple free-standing table. In later centuries when the liturgy became a performance by the clergy, it moved physically away from the people to the rear wall. It was no longer a family table but a kind of stage. In those "middle times" the altar was oblong to allow the priest to proclaim two readings from Scripture from opposite ends and separate from the Eucharistic action in the center.

The Second Vatican Council led us back to the earlier practice of the church.

Our tables today are a variety of shapes. So altars may be. Since the sacred food (communion) is distributed as part of the action taking place the tabernacle (reservation) is removed and given another place of honor.

The altar should be beautiful and noble as befits the mystery being celebrated there. But it should be of a simplicity that can be seen as welcoming even to the most humble who might approach it."

Wow, that is horrible what he did to that cathedral. The ironic thing is that his successor, Bishop Robert Finn, is awesome, very much pro-tradition and rock-solid.

The description you quoted is awful, the author sounds like a low-Church Protestant wannabe.

And of course it justifies the rape of that cathedral by an appeal to the Second Vatican Council, which is a whopper of damnable proportions.


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« Reply #165 on: May 05, 2011, 02:20:22 PM »

http://www.diocese-kcsj.org/content/diocese/bishop_emeritus/

Apparently this "Bishop Emeritus" is responsible. Can Roman Catholic bishops retire?

Also from the cathedral site:


"THE ALTAR
Like a dining room or kitchen table for a family, the altar should be more or less centrally located (to symbolize a welcome gathering around the table). For the first few centuries of the church's existence it was a simple free-standing table. In later centuries when the liturgy became a performance by the clergy, it moved physically away from the people to the rear wall. It was no longer a family table but a kind of stage. In those "middle times" the altar was oblong to allow the priest to proclaim two readings from Scripture from opposite ends and separate from the Eucharistic action in the center.

The Second Vatican Council led us back to the earlier practice of the church.

Our tables today are a variety of shapes. So altars may be. Since the sacred food (communion) is distributed as part of the action taking place the tabernacle (reservation) is removed and given another place of honor.

The altar should be beautiful and noble as befits the mystery being celebrated there. But it should be of a simplicity that can be seen as welcoming even to the most humble who might approach it."

Wow, that is horrible what he did to that cathedral. The ironic thing is that his successor, Bishop Robert Finn, is awesome, very much pro-tradition and rock-solid.

The description you quoted is awful, the author sounds like a low-Church Protestant wannabe.

And of course it justifies the rape of that cathedral by an appeal to the Second Vatican Council, which is a whopper of damnable proportions.




Just goes to show that some Catholics can be as woefully ignorant about the complexities of their faith's teachings as are some Orthodox!  Wink Wink Wink
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« Reply #166 on: May 05, 2011, 02:26:21 PM »

You guys are crazy. The church looks much better in the second picture.
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« Reply #167 on: May 05, 2011, 03:28:54 PM »

The newly renovated Roman Catholic Church in my neighborhood:



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« Reply #168 on: May 05, 2011, 09:11:50 PM »

Just goes to show that some professional Catholics can be as woewilfully ignorant about the complexities of their faith's teachings as are some Orthodox!  Wink Wink Wink
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« Reply #169 on: May 09, 2011, 02:09:53 AM »

And of course it justifies the rape of that cathedral by an appeal to the Second Vatican Council, which is a whopper of damnable proportions.
I don't understand this. Who has been raping Catholic cathedrals and why are they doing so?
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« Reply #170 on: May 09, 2011, 12:23:49 PM »

And of course it justifies the rape of that cathedral by an appeal to the Second Vatican Council, which is a whopper of damnable proportions.
I don't understand this. Who has been raping Catholic cathedrals and why are they doing so?

Some bishops or "liturgists" have, and they are iconoclasts. They have a faulty understanding of liturgy and want to impose this on churches by "wreckovating" old churches and building monstrous new ones. They've had their heyday (1970s and 1980s) but they still occasionally do some serious damage.

One of the more notorious recent examples was Archbishop Rembert Weakland's $12 million destruction of the cathedral in Milwaukee in 2001. Incidentally, Weakland's horrified flock appealed to Rome to stop this, and the Holy See told Weakland to desist. He disobeyed.



May God have mercy on these church rapists' souls, because I wouldn't.
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« Reply #171 on: May 09, 2011, 07:54:50 PM »

And of course it justifies the rape of that cathedral by an appeal to the Second Vatican Council, which is a whopper of damnable proportions.
I don't understand this. Who has been raping Catholic cathedrals and why are they doing so?

You mess with the bull, you get the horns Wink
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« Reply #172 on: May 12, 2011, 05:21:46 AM »

The newly renovated Roman Catholic Church in my neighborhood:


The lighting on the crucifix is unbelievable - I can't think of any other way to describe it  Shocked

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« Reply #173 on: May 12, 2011, 08:23:08 AM »

The newly renovated Roman Catholic Church in my neighborhood:


The lighting on the crucifix is unbelievable - I can't think of any other way to describe it  Shocked



The crucifix made me think a bit as it says a great deal about the differences in the spiritual approach to Christ between the East and West - we of the East (Orthodox or Eastern Catholic alike)  would place a Pantocrator, a Panaghia or even an Icon of the Resurrected Christ in a place of predominance within our churches - but never such a graphic rendering of Christ's suffering and passion.

It calls to mind the generally negative Orthodox reaction to works such as the Passion of the Christ.

This is not to claim that either the Roman Church downplays the Resurrection or that the Orthodox downplay the passion - but stylistically and prayerfully there is a difference.

Sorry for going off-topic a bit but they say that a picture can be worth a thousand words.

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« Reply #174 on: May 12, 2011, 10:39:13 AM »

The newly renovated Roman Catholic Church in my neighborhood:


The lighting on the crucifix is unbelievable - I can't think of any other way to describe it  Shocked



The crucifix made me think a bit as it says a great deal about the differences in the spiritual approach to Christ between the East and West - we of the East (Orthodox or Eastern Catholic alike)  would place a Pantocrator, a Panaghia or even an Icon of the Resurrected Christ in a place of predominance within our churches - but never such a graphic rendering of Christ's suffering and passion.

It calls to mind the generally negative Orthodox reaction to works such as the Passion of the Christ.

This is not to claim that either the Roman Church downplays the Resurrection or that the Orthodox downplay the passion - but stylistically and prayerfully there is a difference.

Sorry for going off-topic a bit but they say that a picture can be worth a thousand words.



Well I'm a big Crucifix guy but I hate that one too.
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« Reply #175 on: May 12, 2011, 12:47:46 PM »


Well I'm a big Crucifix guy but I hate that one too.

I find it significant that in the photo the corpus is obliterated by the lighting.  I wonder if that is the case in real life.  What would be the message in that I wonder...intended and unintended.  I can see it might be the intention to view the cruciform in light of the resurrection but I don't think that is what happens in reality, nor is it the purpose of the cruciform in the first place.

The cruciform in Weakland's Wobbly is just an abomination...I don't mind the corpus as drawn by John of the Cross and reproduced in three dimensional cruciform, or even the elongated figures in paintings in the Spanish style but there must be limits on the place for abstraction in representative art that claims to present the body of Christ.
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« Reply #176 on: May 12, 2011, 12:52:31 PM »


Well I'm a big Crucifix guy but I hate that one too.

I find it significant that in the photo the corpus is obliterated by the lighting.  I wonder if that is the case in real life.  What would be the message in that I wonder...intended and unintended.  I can see it might be the intention to view the cruciform in light of the resurrection but I don't think that is what happens in reality, nor is it the purpose of the cruciform in the first place.

The cruciform in Weakland's Wobbly is just an abomination...I don't mind the corpus as drawn by John of the Cross and reproduced in three dimensional cruciform, or even the elongated figures in paintings in the Spanish style but there must be limits on the place for abstraction in representative art that claims to present the body of Christ.

I agree with you about John of the Cross, I did mean to imply that the crucifix is inappropriate within Orthodoxy - just the type of emphasis on the physical suffering as depicted in the Weakland picture.

For example, here is an example of a crucifix with a corpus within one of the holiest and most sacred Orthodox Churches of Russia, Holy Trinity Cathedral of St. Daniel Monastery. Check out the 35 second mark of the video against the wall of the church:  Holy Trinity Cathedral of St. Daniel Monastery  Both our parish cemetery and a cross dedicated to the soldiers of the First World War have an almost identical depiction of the crucified Saviour as do many churches and cemeteries of that era. http://www.youtube.com/user/russianchurch#p/u/124/4a03uniwp4Y

(Whenever I see these videos from the Patriarchate, I wonder at who has the vestment concession there!  Wink )
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« Reply #177 on: May 12, 2011, 03:40:34 PM »

I wear a crucifix because it reminds me to have gratitude for what Jesus suffered for us. That's the reason they display large crucifixes in the RCC. I can appreciate a King of Glory cross as well, but I don't find a 'graphic rendering' of the Passion to be inappropriate. I was never called out for wearing one by my Orthodox friends when I was younger.
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« Reply #178 on: May 13, 2011, 04:22:24 PM »

Behold! The future of Catholic churches in America...



(No, that's not a Catholic church. Yet. Wink )
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« Reply #179 on: May 13, 2011, 05:06:08 PM »

Behold! The future of Catholic churches in America...



(No, that's not a Catholic church. Yet. Wink )

Kind of looks like the Imperial Senate Chamber in Star Wars!
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