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Author Topic: reviews of the Jordanville Prayer Book  (Read 2401 times) Average Rating: 0
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Tikhon.of.Colorado
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« on: October 21, 2010, 02:52:16 AM »

Hello, All.  please, those of you who have it, please contribute a review (pro's/con's etc.) for the Jordanville prayer book.
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« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2010, 09:07:34 AM »

Pros:
- There is a fullness and completeness to the prayers. With some other prayer books I felt like I was just repeating a mere handful of prayers that were thrown together.
- Widely respected and used
- Has a respectful tone about it

Cons:
- Uses terminology and has you praying things that likely has little meaning to most people (mercenariness, etc.)
- Very focused on our sinfulness, which could make for a depressing prayer time for some (or you may just consider it theologically distorted)

Other things to be aware of:
- Some of the info (e.g. how to pray in Church) may not fit your local customs
- Some of the lines take a few repetitions to get a handle on
- Isn't modernised (e.g. it uses thy, thou, etc.)
- In the morning prayers you pray for the Russian land and her people
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« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2010, 04:00:26 PM »

I'd agree with Asteriktos, especially that it can be kinda clunky...

I also think this prayer book could benefit from the inclusion of more catechetical/confession-guide type material like in the Antiochian little red book.

But on the whole a good and useful prayer book.

Also I'm not sure about the OCA, but I know most ROCOR parishes use the Horologion published by Jordanville, so one advantage is if your parish uses this Horologion your prayer book will be consistent with the book of hours.
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« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2010, 04:03:34 PM »

I think it's the best prayerbook on the market, along with the Old Orthodox Prayerbook. It's very comprehensive. The only thing I wish they would add to it would be a guide to confession, including prayers, which I've seen in other prayerbooks.
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« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2010, 04:53:56 PM »

- In the morning prayers you pray for the Russian land and her people

Not if you cross out those prayers. (Not that I don't care about the Russian people, it was just very distracting and awkward for me...)

Anyway, I love it these days. I used to have trouble with the whole "I'm the worst sinner ever in the history of the universe" slant, but these days I'm starting to see the value in it.

The prayerbook has a very monastic feel to it, so you have to be prepared for that.
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« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2010, 05:14:35 PM »

I have a copy. I use it for the prayers in the morning and evening, and for the Orthros Psalms.
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« Reply #6 on: October 21, 2010, 05:29:37 PM »

- In the morning prayers you pray for the Russian land and her people

Not if you cross out those prayers. (Not that I don't care about the Russian people, it was just very distracting and awkward for me...)

Anyway, I love it these days. I used to have trouble with the whole "I'm the worst sinner ever in the history of the universe" slant, but these days I'm starting to see the value in it.

The prayerbook has a very monastic feel to it, so you have to be prepared for that.
interesting...if I do get it, I think I'll write in prayer for ALL Slavic peoples, instead of just Russians.
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« Reply #7 on: October 21, 2010, 05:56:18 PM »

- In the morning prayers you pray for the Russian land and her people

Not if you cross out those prayers. (Not that I don't care about the Russian people, it was just very distracting and awkward for me...)

Anyway, I love it these days. I used to have trouble with the whole "I'm the worst sinner ever in the history of the universe" slant, but these days I'm starting to see the value in it.

The prayerbook has a very monastic feel to it, so you have to be prepared for that.
interesting...if I do get it, I think I'll write in prayer for ALL Slavic peoples, instead of just Russians.

I think the idea has always been that one prays for the world and the nation where one resides. If you want to add a particular country, race or ethnicity please make sure that you do not omit the needed parts.
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« Reply #8 on: October 21, 2010, 07:33:21 PM »


One pleasant aspect for Russians in the West and for Western converts is that the Jordanville Prayer Book is the exact same Prayer Book as is used throughout Russia.   So there's a feeling of solidarity.



I have been using mine now for over 30 years.  So its durability of several decades is another point in its favour.
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« Reply #9 on: October 21, 2010, 09:23:21 PM »


One pleasant aspect for Russians in the West and for Western converts is that the Jordanville Prayer Book is the exact same Prayer Book as is used throughout Russia.   So there's a feeling of solidarity.



I have been using mine now for over 30 years.  So its durability of several decades is another point in its favour.
Do these prayer books contain prayers that are like the Liturgy of the Hours?
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« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2010, 09:28:44 PM »


One pleasant aspect for Russians in the West and for Western converts is that the Jordanville Prayer Book is the exact same Prayer Book as is used throughout Russia.   So there's a feeling of solidarity.



I have been using mine now for over 30 years.  So its durability of several decades is another point in its favour.
Do these prayer books contain prayers that are like the Liturgy of the Hours?

Not really, for that you would get the Horologion.
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« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2010, 10:11:36 PM »

I love the Jordanville Prayer Book.  I like it because the prayers aren't too short or too long, but just right.  Morning and Evening Prayer takes no more than 25 minutes each if done at a normal pace.  Also, for those of us who are converts, who tend to be prone to a particular kind of spiritual pride, the prayer book is useful as the prayers help bring us into repentence, bring about compunction, and remind us of our complete unworthiness.  And well, the prayers are just beautiful.  The only downside for me is that the akathists and three canons are not combined as they are when we prepare for Holy Communion.  I found it impossible to pray undistracted when I had to flip back and forth and remember all the rubrics for reading multiple canons together.  I ended up buying a combined version of the akathists and three canons at the Holy Virgin Cathedral in San Fran for a couple of bucks.  And as someone else already mentioned, the terminology in some places is awkward.  Otherwise, I'm happy with it! 

Oh, and one more thing...I don't like the fact that it uses Theotokos instead of Mother of God.  I prefer Mother of God, despite the fact that it isn't an accurate translation of Theotokos.  As a Westerner, I prefer it.  Personal taste, I suppose...
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« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2010, 10:28:26 PM »


The Greek site Myriobiblos has placed the whole text of the Jordanville Prayer Book online at

http://www.myriobiblos.gr/texts/english/prayerbook/main.htm

You can examine its content before you decide on purchasing a hard copy.

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« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2010, 10:39:40 PM »


The Greek site Myriobiblos has placed the whole text of the Jordanville Prayer Book online at

http://www.myriobiblos.gr/texts/english/prayerbook/main.htm

You can examine its content before you decide on purchasing a hard copy.



But this is the old Lazarus Moore translation. The translations in the current edition are notably different (and usually better, in my opinion.)
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« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2010, 10:43:55 PM »


...I don't like the fact that it uses Theotokos instead of Mother of God.  I prefer Mother of God, despite the fact that it isn't an accurate translation of Theotokos.  As a Westerner, I prefer it.  Personal taste, I suppose...

In that case what you need is the original Jordanville Prayes Book.  With the blessing of Metropolitan Laurus this came back into print in 2005.  

People in England and throughout the British Commonwealth had refused to change to the "new" Jordanville Prayer Book which changed "Mother of God" to "Theotokos."  It is believed this was done to bring the American Prayer Book into line with English usage in the OCA.  

For several decades those who speak British used to photocopy and rebind the original Jordanville and refused to have the new "Theotokos" editions.

It can be obtained from American book suppliers.


Original Jordanville Prayer Book back in Print
http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,5531.0.html
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« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2010, 10:50:16 PM »

Thank you, Father!
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« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2010, 10:51:30 PM »

Do the Greek Orthodox like it also?
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« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2010, 10:54:47 PM »

Mother  of  God

Some beautiful thoughts from Abbot German of Old Forge on the use of "Mother of God"

Ever since I learned to say formal prayers as a little lad, I have called the most holy Virgin "Mother of God," and I will continue to do so, by Gods' grace,  for the rest of my life, hoping that even with my last words I will invoke her. Although I confess to being, as one writer would categorize me,  a "lazy former Roman Catholic", it is not for this reason that I say "Mother of God," but because such  is the normal English for the title Theotokos.

The word "Theotokos" itself appears in the Oxford English Dictionary, but with a mark indicating that it is a foreign term. The first citation of the word is only from 1874, from the Tractarian E.B. Pusey, who in using it immediately clarified it by adding, Mother of God. The writer who alleges use of the term in the middle ages cites a pre-Reformation prayer in which "otheotocos" appears (from Eamon Duffy's Stripping of the Altars - the correct reference should be to p. 274, not p.24). He  must be aware that it was only used in a rather superstitious context, in a prayer of exorcism, in which various other "names of God" from various languages are used, e.g., Sother, Unigenitus, Adonay and even (I don't know why) Serpens (Serpent) and Vermis (Worm.) This one dubious instance surely does not attest  to any ancient usage of Theotokos in English.

The Theotokos is she who bore God - His Mother. Some translations have used Birthgiver, but that sounds barbarous. Imagine: I am introducing my dear old parent to someone. I certainly wouldn't say, "John, meet my birthgiver." No - my Mother!

Theotokos is a beautiful word, but it is Greek. To insist that it be used habitually for the blessed Virgin would be comparable to saying that we must not call the Deity "God", but "Theos", or our Saviour "Christos" instead of "Christ." No! Greek is Greek, and English is English.

If we habitually use Theotokos, we shall have to keep explaining to people what it means, since, outside of theology students, literate Orthodox or Greek-speakers it will not be understood.

Every language has its own evolution, its own genius. A writer presents, untranslated, a lengthy list of Greek words called "Theotokonyms." Nice, but what does it prove? Only that Greek can form all sorts of compound words. English is remarkably expressive and has a huge vocabulary, but often it expresses by a phrase that which another language might express in a single word. This is not a fault, it is just the nature of the language. When the church books were translated into Slavonic it was possible to form compounds that might not have existed previously, since the language was at a formative stage. But English is already a developed language, and it has its own idiom. So, we don't have a single word for chelovekoliubets, but we can say Lover of mankind, He Who loveth man, the Friend of man, etc.

For that matter "homoousios" is in the O.E.D., and it is a theological term of vital importance, yet no one is contending that we ought to retain it in an English translation of the Creed. We say " of one essence" or "consubstantial", because that is English.

I don't think that it is a good principle of literary translation to insist that every occurrence of a word of the original always be rendered by the same word in the translation. The translation must fit the context. So, sometimes we can say God's Mother, or Theotokos, while retaining "Mother of God" as the most familiar form of our Lady's title.

To the writer who did not understand the Latin word "Deipara" which is an exact equivalent of Theotokos: The "-para" does not come from the verb paro, parare - to prepare, but rather from pario, parere, peperci, partus - to give birth, from which we get such words as parturition - childbirth and post-partum depression - that which occurs after giving birth. As we shall soon sing, once we have past the hurdle of the fast, "Ecce quod natura/ Mutat sua jura/ Virgo parit pura/ Dei filium." (Behold, how nature changes its own laws: A pure Virgin gives birth to the Son of God.)

I think there is a place for the word Theotokos in English, as an alternate name for the Mother of God, particularly in such contexts as the hymn "It is truly meet." But the normal, usual, common, frequent word in English is and should be Mother of God, because that's English, not Greek, Latin or Slavonic.

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« Reply #18 on: October 21, 2010, 11:02:28 PM »

Just wanted to say thanks - based on reading this thread, I've just ordered a used copy of this prayer book from Amazon.

Sowe've just made some poor used book seller very happy! Cheesy
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« Reply #19 on: October 21, 2010, 11:05:20 PM »

^^ My thoughts exactly!

I have no objection to the term Theotokos, but I do get so tired of hearing the idea that Mother of God is inadequate to express what Theotokos expresses. It's like those who (erroneously) insist that icons are written, and that it is wrong to say they are painted. A basic knowledge of Greek, and, indeed, of Slavonic, puts the lie to that shibboleth.  Roll Eyes
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« Reply #20 on: October 21, 2010, 11:09:14 PM »

Father, I agree with every word of Abbot German!  When I was taught to do my prayer rope to the Mother of God, I did "O Most Holy Theotokos save us!" and a lot of the time I nearly forgot who I was praying to!  The word is so foreign to me.  I have less distraction and am able to prayer more fervently with warmness of heart when saying, "O Most Holy Mother of God, save us!"
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« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2010, 11:25:35 PM »

Father, I agree with every word of Abbot German!  When I was taught to do my prayer rope to the Mother of God, I did "O Most Holy Theotokos save us!" and a lot of the time I nearly forgot who I was praying to!  The word is so foreign to me.  I have less distraction and am able to prayer more fervently with warmness of heart when saying, "O Most Holy Mother of God, save us!"
I agree.  perhapse it's from my days in the Roman Catholic Church, or because English is my native language.  I must admit, though, being a "Slavophile", I have gone into calling the Mother of God "Bogoroditsa" (hope I spelled that right!)
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« Reply #22 on: October 21, 2010, 11:31:52 PM »

Father, I agree with every word of Abbot German!  When I was taught to do my prayer rope to the Mother of God, I did "O Most Holy Theotokos save us!" and a lot of the time I nearly forgot who I was praying to!  The word is so foreign to me.  I have less distraction and am able to prayer more fervently with warmness of heart when saying, "O Most Holy Mother of God, save us!"
I agree.  perhapse it's from my days in the Roman Catholic Church, or because English is my native language.  I must admit, though, being a "Slavophile", I have gone into calling the Mother of God "Bogoroditsa" ...

Do Slavophiles think of the Almighty as the Eternal Bog then?

 Smiley
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« Reply #23 on: October 21, 2010, 11:37:45 PM »

Father, I agree with every word of Abbot German!  When I was taught to do my prayer rope to the Mother of God, I did "O Most Holy Theotokos save us!" and a lot of the time I nearly forgot who I was praying to!  The word is so foreign to me.  I have less distraction and am able to prayer more fervently with warmness of heart when saying, "O Most Holy Mother of God, save us!"
I agree.  perhapse it's from my days in the Roman Catholic Church, or because English is my native language.  I must admit, though, being a "Slavophile", I have gone into calling the Mother of God "Bogoroditsa" ...

Do Slavophiles think of the Almighty as the Eternal Bog then?

 Smiley
lol, I'm not sure about that one!   Wink
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« Reply #24 on: October 21, 2010, 11:53:45 PM »

Do Slavophiles think of the Almighty as the Eternal Bog then?

 Smiley

If they have Irish or Scottish ancestry they would!  laugh laugh
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« Reply #25 on: October 21, 2010, 11:55:53 PM »

Do Slavophiles think of the Almighty as the Eternal Bog then?

 Smiley

If they have Irish or Scottish ancestry they would!  laugh laugh
lol, really!!!  I'm Scots Irish (1/8, on my dad's side).   Cheesy
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« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2010, 11:58:25 PM »

I think it probably depends on what you grew up with to an extent. I grew up Protestant and never said Mother of God. When I became Orthodox the most oft used term was Theotokos. So to me O Most Holy Theotokos save us does not sound cold at all.

And I'm sorry but 'Christ' is not English any more than Theotokos. English would be 'the Anointed One' or something like that.

I do not think 'Birthgiver to God' sounds barbaric at all, either... just too long.

And I'm also not convinced if you asked a 9th century Bulgarian to describe their language they would say, 'Oh well, it's really rather immature and underdeveloped. Now would be a perfect time for some transliteration from Greek to really mature it'.

How about Godbegetress? Ok just kidding

Oh and 'consubstantial' is just a straight-up wrong translation. Ουσία does not mean 'substance'.
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« Reply #27 on: October 22, 2010, 12:12:15 AM »

I've said it in other threads, and I'll say it again, I prefer "Mother of God." Like another poster said, it warms my heart.

Actually, we have three nuns (abbess plus two others) that do much of the chanting at our church, and one of the nuns ALWAYS substitutes "Mother of God" whenever the text reads Theotokos. She's on my team.  Wink
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« Reply #28 on: October 22, 2010, 12:20:25 AM »

I've said it in other threads, and I'll say it again, I prefer "Mother of God." Like another poster said, it warms my heart.

Actually, we have three nuns (abbess plus two others) that do much of the chanting at our church, and one of the nuns ALWAYS substitutes "Mother of God" whenever the text reads Theotokos. She's on my team.  Wink

Just curious, what about the Axion estin?
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« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2010, 01:36:24 AM »

All the above comments about the word Theotokos are utter nonsense. It does mean birth giver of God, but in Greek liturgical texts they also say Mother of God, as for example: Mhter Theou Pansemne, Mhter Theou amome, dio se, Mhtera Theou pantes ginoskomen, etc. Theotokos is a name that is translated into Slavonic as Bogoroditsa. So, in English if they say Holy Birth Giver of God that not only clunky, but it is also inaccurate, thus, translators do not translate Theotokos.

Most Holy Theotokos save us!
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« Reply #30 on: October 22, 2010, 02:29:28 AM »

I've said it in other threads, and I'll say it again, I prefer "Mother of God." Like another poster said, it warms my heart.

Actually, we have three nuns (abbess plus two others) that do much of the chanting at our church, and one of the nuns ALWAYS substitutes "Mother of God" whenever the text reads Theotokos. She's on my team.  Wink

Just curious, what about the Axion estin?

They use the typical translation. The abbess always uses Theotokos. It's just her rouge nun that does it, especially during "Most Holy Mother of God, save us."
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« Reply #31 on: October 22, 2010, 04:57:18 AM »

I've said it in other threads, and I'll say it again, I prefer "Mother of God." Like another poster said, it warms my heart.

Actually, we have three nuns (abbess plus two others) that do much of the chanting at our church, and one of the nuns ALWAYS substitutes "Mother of God" whenever the text reads Theotokos. She's on my team.  Wink

Just curious, what about the Axion estin?

http://www.myriobiblos.gr/texts/english/prayerbook/main.htm

It is meet and right to bless thee, the ever-blessed and all-pure Virgin and Mother of our God. More honourable than the Cherubim, and incomparably more glorious than the Seraphim, thou who in virginity didst bear God the Word, thee, true Mother of God, we magnify.


This was the version in ROCA churches until the word "Theotokos" was introduced in recent decades.
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« Reply #32 on: October 22, 2010, 11:05:57 AM »

I love the word "Theotokos" - when I use it I feel connected to the ancient church.  But I don't think anything's wrong with saying "Mother of God" if you're more comfortable with it. Just one of those personal preference things, I guess. Smiley
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« Reply #33 on: October 22, 2010, 11:46:13 AM »

Let's just say BVM and get it over with.


(joking)
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« Reply #34 on: October 22, 2010, 11:48:14 AM »

Let's just say BVM and get it over with.


(joking)

I've always despised the abbreviation "BVM" but I refuse to tell you why.  Shocked Roll Eyes   Grin
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« Reply #35 on: October 22, 2010, 02:24:49 PM »

Let's just say BVM and get it over with.


(joking)

I've always despised the abbreviation "BVM" but I refuse to tell you why.  Shocked Roll Eyes   Grin
what exactly is "BVM"?
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« Reply #36 on: October 22, 2010, 02:33:57 PM »

I love the word "Theotokos" - when I use it I feel connected to the ancient church.  But I don't think anything's wrong with saying "Mother of God" if you're more comfortable with it. Just one of those personal preference things, I guess. Smiley
I agree completely.
I've said it in other threads, and I'll say it again, I prefer "Mother of God." Like another poster said, it warms my heart.

Actually, we have three nuns (abbess plus two others) that do much of the chanting at our church, and one of the nuns ALWAYS substitutes "Mother of God" whenever the text reads Theotokos. She's on my team.  Wink

Just curious, what about the Axion estin?

http://www.myriobiblos.gr/texts/english/prayerbook/main.htm

It is meet and right to bless thee, the ever-blessed and all-pure Virgin and Mother of our God. More honourable than the Cherubim, and incomparably more glorious than the Seraphim, thou who in virginity didst bear God the Word, thee, true Mother of God, we magnify.


This was the version in ROCA churches until the word "Theotokos" was introduced in recent decades.

How can you justify that translation considering both the Greek and Slavonic have Θεοτόκον/Богородице where you have "Virgin"? I do not see дево anywhere in the Slavonic.
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« Reply #37 on: October 22, 2010, 02:43:09 PM »

Whatever the merits of "Theotokos" vs. "Mother of God," I think Fr. Lazarus' translations were rather clunky in comparison to the new edition.
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« Reply #38 on: October 22, 2010, 02:52:09 PM »

Let's just say BVM and get it over with.


(joking)

I've always despised the abbreviation "BVM" but I refuse to tell you why.  Shocked Roll Eyes   Grin
what exactly is "BVM"?
You might find some idea here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BMV. But I'm sure theistgal is going to keep her secret!
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« Reply #39 on: October 22, 2010, 04:35:33 PM »

Let's just say BVM and get it over with.

(joking)

I've always despised the abbreviation "BVM" but I refuse to tell you why.  Shocked Roll Eyes   Grin
what exactly is "BVM"?
Blessed Virgin Mary
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« Reply #40 on: October 22, 2010, 05:46:34 PM »

Let's just say BVM and get it over with.


(joking)

I've always despised the abbreviation "BVM" but I refuse to tell you why.  Shocked Roll Eyes   Grin
what exactly is "BVM"?

It's the ISO 639-3 language code for the Bamunka language of Cameroon.  Duh...   Wink

On topic, I used that Prayer Book for years and liked it a lot.
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« Reply #41 on: November 11, 2010, 08:43:43 AM »

- In the morning prayers you pray for the Russian land and her people

Maybe simply replace the references with America (or wherever you may reside) and the American people?
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« Reply #42 on: November 11, 2010, 12:31:26 PM »

BVM = "Blessed Virgin Mary"
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« Reply #43 on: November 12, 2010, 11:42:00 AM »

Father, I agree with every word of Abbot German!  When I was taught to do my prayer rope to the Mother of God, I did "O Most Holy Theotokos save us!" and a lot of the time I nearly forgot who I was praying to!  The word is so foreign to me.  I have less distraction and am able to prayer more fervently with warmness of heart when saying, "O Most Holy Mother of God, save us!"
I agree.  perhapse it's from my days in the Roman Catholic Church, or because English is my native language.  I must admit, though, being a "Slavophile", I have gone into calling the Mother of God "Bogoroditsa" (hope I spelled that right!)

"Bogoroditsa" means Birthgiver of God. Of course, the Theotokos had to give birth to Jesus our Lord but she was much more than that; she was His mother and loved and nurtured Him, which love He returned. I am in the camp of those who prefer Mother of God.
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« Reply #44 on: November 12, 2010, 12:04:20 PM »

I love the word "Theotokos" - when I use it I feel connected to the ancient church.  But I don't think anything's wrong with saying "Mother of God" if you're more comfortable with it. Just one of those personal preference things, I guess. Smiley
I agree completely.
I've said it in other threads, and I'll say it again, I prefer "Mother of God." Like another poster said, it warms my heart.

Actually, we have three nuns (abbess plus two others) that do much of the chanting at our church, and one of the nuns ALWAYS substitutes "Mother of God" whenever the text reads Theotokos. She's on my team.  Wink

Just curious, what about the Axion estin?

http://www.myriobiblos.gr/texts/english/prayerbook/main.htm

It is meet and right to bless thee, the ever-blessed and all-pure Virgin and Mother of our God. More honourable than the Cherubim, and incomparably more glorious than the Seraphim, thou who in virginity didst bear God the Word, thee, true Mother of God, we magnify.


This was the version in ROCA churches until the word "Theotokos" was introduced in recent decades.

How can you justify that translation considering both the Greek and Slavonic have Θεοτόκον/Богородице where you have "Virgin"? I do not see дево anywhere in the Slavonic.

For what it is worth:

"    It is truly right to bless thee, O Theotokos,
    ever blessed, and most pure, and the Mother of our God.
    More honorable than the cherubim,
    and beyond compare more glorious than the seraphim.
    Without corruption thou gavest birth to God the Word.
    True Theotokos, we magnify thee.

The second half of the hymn, beginning with the words, "More honorable than the cherubim..." is the older part of the hymn, and is an Irmos attributed to St. Cosmas the Hymnographer († 773). The introduction, "It is truly meet..." was, according to tradition, revealed by the Archangel Gabriel to a monk on Mount Athos."

Source: http://dictionary.sensagent.com/Axion_Estin/en-en/
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« Reply #45 on: November 12, 2010, 01:32:01 PM »

I prefer translating into "Mother of God" when the Greek text uses variations on "Ματηρ Θεου" and Theotokos when the Greek text actually says "Θεοτοκος." It provides a linguistic continuity, a slightly more accurate translation and is just more poetic, in my opinion. But, that's just an opinion.

As far as the Jordanville is concerned, I really enjoy it. I'm a big supporter of Liturgical English, which sounds quite similar to King James English. It is usually fairly theologically accurate, as well as conveys the beauty of the Liturgy. The Jordanville can be somewhat clunky for those not used to older English and seems to, at times, stick closer to the syntax of the original language that what is comfortable for the average English-speaker.

In short: It could take some warming-up to, but I've found it to be an accurate, beautiful and edifying translation.
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