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Libertas
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+ St Maximos, pray for us sinners!


« on: October 03, 2010, 02:49:40 PM »

Today I attended my first Liturgy at an Orthodox parish, a Ukrainian Orthodox church. The service was mostly in Ukrainian, with some bilingual parts here and there (the readings, etc.). Although I didn't walk out thinking I had experienced Heaven, I felt at-peace with everything that happened--even the foreign language. I was completely comfortable with the service, even with the references to Mary, the icons, and the rest of the worship. A lot of it was new, though, having never been in an actual service, and so I ended up doing more observation and following along in the prayer book than actually participating. It was all fine, though!

Before and after there were about three ladies that introduced themselves, and one even politely spurred me to venerate the cross and take some of the blessed bread after the service. For some reason they didn't take Communion, except for two infants. Lastly, I had a very brief introduction with the priest, who welcomed my mother and I, and even said that had he known of our presence, he would have had more bilingual elements.

I've committed to going twice more because I heard an Ancient Faith podcast that recommended committing to go three times to a parish if you're new to the Faith. My head is pretty much ready to accept Orthodoxy, but now my heart must follow it, which probably won't be very hard.

Prayers would be appreciated! Thanks for the support on this forum so far.  Smiley

God bless,
Andrew

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Ionnis
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« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2010, 02:59:20 PM »

Glory to God! 
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2010, 03:02:07 PM »

Andrew, I'm so glad to hear that you've had a positive experience. I have visited a Ukrainian Orthodox service a couple of times. Sadly, a small and aging congregation, but the people were very friendly. It was obvious to me that receiving Communion is not a weekly event for them. I know that practice varies from one tradition to another. Once you settle into a parish, you will want to follow the norms you experience there under the priest's direction.

And you are quite right: your first few visits will be mostly observation and following along. I wish more people would learn to observe better, rather than "follow along". We need to become participants in worship - not just "followers along". Keep watching and learning. And do keep us informed!

BTW, what was your mother's reaction to the service and to your desire to be there?
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Libertas
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+ St Maximos, pray for us sinners!


« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2010, 03:51:04 PM »

A fuller description of my experience can be found on my blog, here: http://perspectivecontrast.blogspot.com/

I'll certainly keep you posted and answer genesisone's question, as well as any other, some time later.
 Smiley
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HandmaidenofGod
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O Holy St. Demetrius pray to God for us!


« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2010, 06:07:21 PM »

Glory to God!
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"For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope." Jer 29:11
Tikhon.of.Colorado
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« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2010, 10:42:13 PM »

glory be to God!

may I suggest you pick up an English service book?  their easy enough to find online, or even in a parish bookstore.  it matters all the more if your actually able to know what the priest is saying!!!! Wink
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"It is true that I am not always faithful, but I never lose courage, I leave myself in the Arms of Our Lord." - St. Thérèse of Lisieux
Libertas
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« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2010, 10:56:18 PM »

genesisone: My mother is supportive. She was raised as a Ukrainian-Greek Catholic, so most of the Liturgy's content would be familiar, but the chanting style is different. We both noticed this. She told me on the way to church that she's happy that I'm looking into things. We also talked about the difference of reverential attitudes in the churches I was raised in, compared to Orthodoxy. She might even attend again in the future.

She has never been an Evangelical, but has attended the United Church of Canada with my grandma since the local Roman Catholic church (where I think she intended to raise me because I was baptized there?) closed down. The United Church is mostly the result of a union between Methodists, Presbyterians, and Congregationalists in 1925. I'd classify them as centrist-to-liberal Protestant. If you're curious at all, there's information at their website: http://www.united-church.ca/

trevor72694: The best part about the service book is that it was written in Ukrainian and English, though I only read the English text. I only know a few words in the language myself, and that being mostly food items. Wink This would be great advice if they did not already have that resource! Smiley   As for parish bookstores, there's a Catholic store in this city's mall and a Christian bookstore, but from what I can tell, Orthodoxy is pretty sparse around here. That could change, though. I ended up taking a pamphlet home with me today, too.
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Tikhon.of.Colorado
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« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2010, 10:58:35 PM »

ah yes, I know what you mean!  you should see me around my Mexican friends "Taco, Chalupa, Nacho...."  Cheesy
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"It is true that I am not always faithful, but I never lose courage, I leave myself in the Arms of Our Lord." - St. Thérèse of Lisieux
Libertas
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« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2010, 11:02:51 PM »

ah yes, I know what you mean!  you should see me around my Mexican friends "Taco, Chalupa, Nacho...."  Cheesy

Bahah! I think I've done that with some of my friends who know different languages (Germans, etc.). Certain phrases, once I learn to speak them, just stick in my head. Actually, I remember making up lyrics to "La Cucharachas" made purely out of Mexican foods. Tongue   It was something like, "You want some nachos and quesadillas? La la la la la la la."
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Tikhon.of.Colorado
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« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2010, 11:05:59 PM »

ah yes, I know what you mean!  you should see me around my Mexican friends "Taco, Chalupa, Nacho...."  Cheesy

Bahah! I think I've done that with some of my friends who know different languages (Germans, etc.). Certain phrases, once I learn to speak them, just stick in my head. Actually, I remember making up lyrics to "La Cucharachas" made purely out of Mexican foods. Tongue   It was something like, "You want some nachos and quesadillas? La la la la la la la."

ah yes.  Mexicaan quizine is indeed something to sing about!!!!! Cheesy   

I knew Slovak, almost fluently, when I was a Child (from my Grandfather).  but, a Slovak kid came to my school, and the fact that I couldn't understand it made me go to the bathroom and cry Embarrassed 

one thing I do know is how to call someone a dunderhead in German, which luckuly is the only thing my grandmother ever taught me! Cheesy
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« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2010, 07:35:28 AM »

You are very fortunate to have your mother's support. It appears that you have a very good relationship with her.

Your description of the United Church is quite accurate in my opinion. I hope our friends in the US will check out the link you provided. The UCC is very typically Canadian in many respects and has been an underlying force in many of our socio-political developments.

My own priest is a retired UCC minister. As the years went by, he became more saddened and disillusioned with the direction that the UCC was taking. He entered the Orthodox Church immediately upon retirement about ten years ago and was elevated to the priesthood after several years as a deacon about two years ago. Our small mission parish really appreciates the fact that we can have a full time priest with minimal cost to us, as his UCC pension is quite adequate.
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Libertas
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+ St Maximos, pray for us sinners!


« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2010, 10:32:17 PM »

You are very fortunate to have your mother's support. It appears that you have a very good relationship with her.

Your description of the United Church is quite accurate in my opinion. I hope our friends in the US will check out the link you provided. The UCC is very typically Canadian in many respects and has been an underlying force in many of our socio-political developments.

My own priest is a retired UCC minister. As the years went by, he became more saddened and disillusioned with the direction that the UCC was taking. He entered the Orthodox Church immediately upon retirement about ten years ago and was elevated to the priesthood after several years as a deacon about two years ago. Our small mission parish really appreciates the fact that we can have a full time priest with minimal cost to us, as his UCC pension is quite adequate.


That's interesting! For some reason I never entertained the idea of United Church members converting to Orthodoxy. Clergy, no less! (I don't want to sound condemning or whatever, but...) from my very limited experience of the UCC, there is more of a focus on sentimentality and "being open" than on doctrine. From what I know, there is a lot of missionary activity and providing for people, though, which is quite easy to affirm and probably good to imitate.

Have you had any experience yourself of the UCC?
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« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2010, 06:52:59 AM »

That's interesting! For some reason I never entertained the idea of United Church members converting to Orthodoxy. Clergy, no less! (I don't want to sound condemning or whatever, but...) from my very limited experience of the UCC, there is more of a focus on sentimentality and "being open" than on doctrine. From what I know, there is a lot of missionary activity and providing for people, though, which is quite easy to affirm and probably good to imitate.
Have you had any experience yourself of the UCC?
Well, it was exactly that sentimentality and openness that Fr David fought against for many years. He worked hard at even the national level to keep the UCC on an even keel, but eventually chose to leave and pursue the stability of Orthodoxy.

I was never a member of the UCC myself. Over the years I have had (and do have) friends who are members of that denomination. I have watched their lives and faith, and of course, done my homework to find out about the UCC. During my university years, I had a couple of friends who attended the UCC seminary, Emmanuel College at the University of Toronto. On at least two occasions I spend a weekend with one or both of them on campus. Of course that was nearly forty years ago. Unfortunately, I have lost touch with them, but do toy with the idea of trying to track them down.

I was raised in the Free Methodist Church, which had been home to my family on both sides for several generations. I remained in that denomination until my chrismation. I still respect the FMC, but call it a mid-life crisis if you like, but in my forties I found myself with questions that seemed to come out of nowhere. I didn't go in search of another church, but when on a whim I visited an Orthodox service, I immediately saw some answers to my questions - enough to start checking out the Orthodox Church. The Wesleyan heritage of the FMC prepared me well in instilling a desire for the holiness that we experience in the Orthodox Church as theosis. The tools that the OC provides in our struggle towards theosis were exactly what I needed and I knew it.
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