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Author Topic: Raising Children in a Mixed Marriage  (Read 8645 times) Average Rating: 5
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Liz
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« Reply #135 on: August 20, 2010, 06:34:15 PM »

The teddy test is not a test about lie versus truth. That test determines the ability to discern correct versus incorrect.

We might be talking about a different test? The one I'm talking about is testing whether or not a child knows that someone else won't know and see exactly what he knows and sees. It's a test of understanding of subjectivity.

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I have to get to the Farmers Market before it closes, I hope someone else can take over and explain more. If not, I can write more tomorrow.

Hope you enjoy the Farmers' Market then!
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« Reply #136 on: August 23, 2010, 10:33:09 AM »

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Much better not to pretend mum and dad can preserve an artificially united front

Actually, it's much better if mom and dad have an actual united front.
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« Reply #137 on: August 23, 2010, 10:57:16 AM »

If I did have children, they could not 'reject' communion, as they would be children!

We serve Communion to children from as young as possible in the East.

So what's the problem then?

Your children won't be served.

Btw, the two pre-teens being baptized yesterday were officially received as catechumen, with the blowing ceremony and everything.
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« Reply #138 on: August 23, 2010, 10:59:37 AM »

There are two major issues that would be fairly insurmountable explaining to children. (George wouldn't have this issue since he doesn't believe that children should be taught about faith at all). The first would be the orthodox view of salvation, the second would be the orthodox view of hell. Those two issues will always be an issue, and a very confusing one at that. You can not teach that "mommy believes this and daddy believes that" without confusing the heck out of the child. Either raise the child orthodox, or raise the child Anglican. Maybe you can make it "work" for your children. But the children will grow up quite confused and may eventually become quite angry and leave all faith altogether. The issues of communion are great as well. You can not have your children partake at one church one week and another a different week. Kids don't stay little forever Wink A child would not be allowed to partake of Anglican and Orthodox Eucharists concurrently. This would place the child in a position where they will have to choose between mom and dad at some point. They will have to decide that one or the other is correct. That is not a fair position to put a child in, it simply isn't healthy. You place the child into a situation of religious divorce whether you intend to or not.

I just don't understand this assumption that children cannot understand two views at once. It speaks poorly of the state of education in America, perhaps, because I've never encountered problems with it here.

They can understand two views at once. They just can't, as neither can adults (despite what the CoE and the American educational establishment preach), hold them at once.
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Liz
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« Reply #139 on: August 23, 2010, 11:03:59 AM »

Quote
Much better not to pretend mum and dad can preserve an artificially united front

Actually, it's much better if mom and dad have an actual united front.

I don't think any couple agrees on everything. The 50s-style 'mummy and daddy are always right' hasn't got the greatest track record, and I'm quite happy to let it fall by the wayside.
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Liz
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« Reply #140 on: August 23, 2010, 11:06:07 AM »

If I did have children, they could not 'reject' communion, as they would be children!

We serve Communion to children from as young as possible in the East.

So what's the problem then?

Your children won't be served.

Btw, the two pre-teens being baptized yesterday were officially received as catechumen, with the blowing ceremony and everything.

That's not what the priest says. They will attend Communion with everyone else in the Orthodox Church, no problem with it.

I think if a pre-teen feels strongly that he or she wants to be a catechumen, you have to respect that, btw.
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Liz
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« Reply #141 on: August 23, 2010, 11:06:56 AM »

There are two major issues that would be fairly insurmountable explaining to children. (George wouldn't have this issue since he doesn't believe that children should be taught about faith at all). The first would be the orthodox view of salvation, the second would be the orthodox view of hell. Those two issues will always be an issue, and a very confusing one at that. You can not teach that "mommy believes this and daddy believes that" without confusing the heck out of the child. Either raise the child orthodox, or raise the child Anglican. Maybe you can make it "work" for your children. But the children will grow up quite confused and may eventually become quite angry and leave all faith altogether. The issues of communion are great as well. You can not have your children partake at one church one week and another a different week. Kids don't stay little forever Wink A child would not be allowed to partake of Anglican and Orthodox Eucharists concurrently. This would place the child in a position where they will have to choose between mom and dad at some point. They will have to decide that one or the other is correct. That is not a fair position to put a child in, it simply isn't healthy. You place the child into a situation of religious divorce whether you intend to or not.

I just don't understand this assumption that children cannot understand two views at once. It speaks poorly of the state of education in America, perhaps, because I've never encountered problems with it here.

They can understand two views at once. They just can't, as neither can adults (despite what the CoE and the American educational establishment preach), hold them at once.

Agreed. Actually, I don't think the CofE has ever suggested someone can hold two views at once (citation?).
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katherineofdixie
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« Reply #142 on: August 23, 2010, 11:26:14 AM »

Quote
Much better not to pretend mum and dad can preserve an artificially united front

Actually, it's much better if mom and dad have an actual united front.

I don't think any couple agrees on everything. The 50s-style 'mummy and daddy are always right' hasn't got the greatest track record, and I'm quite happy to let it fall by the wayside.

No, people disagree on many issues, such as to whether peanut butter should be kept in the refrigerator.

We're not talking about trivial things, and I suspect that you know that.
We're talking about substantive differences.

But since you don't believe children should have the assurance that their parents will make good and right decisions for them, you will, along with their freedom to decide which if any religion they will be brought up in, let your children decide whether or not they will go to the doctor, or the dentist or get immunized or attend school?

Really? I'm astonished to hear that. As a newly-wed, you much prefer the current situation of high divorce rates, "shacking up," and single-parent families?
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« Reply #143 on: August 23, 2010, 11:36:42 AM »

There are two major issues that would be fairly insurmountable explaining to children. (George wouldn't have this issue since he doesn't believe that children should be taught about faith at all). The first would be the orthodox view of salvation, the second would be the orthodox view of hell. Those two issues will always be an issue, and a very confusing one at that. You can not teach that "mommy believes this and daddy believes that" without confusing the heck out of the child. Either raise the child orthodox, or raise the child Anglican. Maybe you can make it "work" for your children. But the children will grow up quite confused and may eventually become quite angry and leave all faith altogether. The issues of communion are great as well. You can not have your children partake at one church one week and another a different week. Kids don't stay little forever Wink A child would not be allowed to partake of Anglican and Orthodox Eucharists concurrently. This would place the child in a position where they will have to choose between mom and dad at some point. They will have to decide that one or the other is correct. That is not a fair position to put a child in, it simply isn't healthy. You place the child into a situation of religious divorce whether you intend to or not.
If they partake of Eucharists concurrently, then they have taken mommy's side by default.  I would say that allowing the children to "chose" is also conceding the Protestant point, although there there is a history of Orthodox postponing baptism (though not in the final analysis IMHO any better reason).
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« Reply #144 on: August 23, 2010, 11:41:18 AM »

Quote
Much better not to pretend mum and dad can preserve an artificially united front

Actually, it's much better if mom and dad have an actual united front.

I don't think any couple agrees on everything. The 50s-style 'mummy and daddy are always right' hasn't got the greatest track record, and I'm quite happy to let it fall by the wayside.

Hmmm.  The 50s mommy and daddy raised the generation of the 60's and 70's.  So they gave them a background of stable family life which the children turned into the domestic chaos we enjoy today. Though Dr. Spock coming out in 1947 did his part, more so his "disciples."
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Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
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« Reply #145 on: August 23, 2010, 11:46:36 AM »

If I did have children, they could not 'reject' communion, as they would be children!

We serve Communion to children from as young as possible in the East.

So what's the problem then?

Your children won't be served.

Btw, the two pre-teens being baptized yesterday were officially received as catechumen, with the blowing ceremony and everything.

That's not what the priest says. They will attend Communion with everyone else in the Orthodox Church, no problem with it.

Not if they aren't baptised Orthodox and remain so (i.e. no communion from the Anglicans) they won't. 

That's not, btw, an issue between you and the priest (is this the same one behind the last minute wedding problems?). It then becomes an issue between the priest and the rest of the Church.

Quote
I think if a pre-teen feels strongly that he or she wants to be a catechumen, you have to respect that, btw.

Depends on what you mean by "respect."
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A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
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Liz
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« Reply #146 on: August 23, 2010, 11:55:43 AM »

Quote
Much better not to pretend mum and dad can preserve an artificially united front

Actually, it's much better if mom and dad have an actual united front.

I don't think any couple agrees on everything. The 50s-style 'mummy and daddy are always right' hasn't got the greatest track record, and I'm quite happy to let it fall by the wayside.

No, people disagree on many issues, such as to whether peanut butter should be kept in the refrigerator.

We're not talking about trivial things, and I suspect that you know that.
We're talking about substantive differences.

Yes, you're right that big differences are more important than small ones - but actually, I think most people do have at least one area of significant disagreement, even if it doesn't emerge for quite a while. For example, lots of my friends are just getting to the age when their children need to go to school, and there are lots of state/private disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve (and, obviously, have far-reaching implications). As far as I know, none of these couples particularly foresaw disagreement, either (I hear a lot of disbelief at 'the absurd things s/he believes!')

Quote
But since you don't believe children should have the assurance that their parents will make good and right decisions for them, you will, along with their freedom to decide which if any religion they will be brought up in, let your children decide whether or not they will go to the doctor, or the dentist or get immunized or attend school?

I don't understand the first part of what you say above - why do you think I believe that?

Quote
Really? I'm astonished to hear that. As a newly-wed, you much prefer the current situation of high divorce rates, "shacking up," and single-parent families?

They are not 'either/or' alternatives, you know. I'd like to think we can progress from a rigid, 50s-style parenting model, and also avoid the other pitfalls. But perhaps I'm overly idealistic.
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katherineofdixie
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« Reply #147 on: August 23, 2010, 12:32:37 PM »

Yes, you're right that big differences are more important than small ones - but actually, I think most people do have at least one area of significant disagreement, even if it doesn't emerge for quite a while. For example, lots of my friends are just getting to the age when their children need to go to school, and there are lots of state/private disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve (and, obviously, have far-reaching implications). As far as I know, none of these couples particularly foresaw disagreement, either (I hear a lot of disbelief at 'the absurd things s/he believes!')

Ok, now imagine these disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve and have far-reaching implications, about religion, in addition to whatever undiscovered disagreements that exist.  And that your children are privy to the remarks about the "absurd things" each of you believes about something as important as God, morality, values, beliefs and faith.
Do you think that makes for a serene and happy home life for the children? From personal experience, even with parents who loved each other devotedly, I can tell you that it doesn't.

Quote
I don't understand the first part of what you say above - why do you think I believe that?
Then you don't believe that children should decide for themselves what religion they will be brought up in? Then who will be doing the deciding?

Quote
They are not 'either/or' alternatives, you know. I'd like to think we can progress from a rigid, 50s-style parenting model, and also avoid the other pitfalls. But perhaps I'm overly idealistic.
It hasn't worked at all well so far, so I think that you are overly idealistic.
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« Reply #148 on: August 23, 2010, 12:33:31 PM »

Liz,

I haven't read through the thread, but I thought I'd pass along a comment that has been oft-repeated in Clergy circles, both Orthodox and non-Orthodox: "If you try to raise them in both faiths, they will choose neither."  I've only seen this a few times myself; but clergy more experienced than I have seen it numerous times, and while it does not happen 100% of the time, it seems to occur pretty close to that.  Here's why I think it happens:

Faith, especially Christian Faith, is focused around encountering Truth in places where it might not be able to be empirically measured.  For us Christians, Anglican and Orthodox alike, the Truth is a person and His Body, the Church, which does His work in the world.  As an adult, it is easy to compartmentalize life while still looking at the Church as the repository of Truth in the world - as someone raised Orthodox, it is possible for me to look at, say, some Eastern mystical religion which says that human beings should not be killed and say, "well they have a grain of the truth there."  

However, when children are raised up in two faith traditions, the first underlying message that comes across is that neither has the Truth (which is why they can't go just to one instead of both).  This prevents the strong bond between person and Faith that occurs when most of us are brought up in a 1-faith household (regardless of the parents' individual affiliations); thus, faith (& religion) will be seen more like a club than a way of life.

This is only a brief summary of my thoughts on the matter, and only stated from a broad, psychological-type perspective (not from the perspective as an Orthodox priest/aspiring theologian).  However, regardless of what I've stated above, I pray that the Holy Spirit guide you to what is right and good for your (and your husband's) salvation and the salvation of any family you decide to raise.
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« Reply #149 on: August 23, 2010, 12:49:43 PM »

Yes, you're right that big differences are more important than small ones - but actually, I think most people do have at least one area of significant disagreement, even if it doesn't emerge for quite a while. For example, lots of my friends are just getting to the age when their children need to go to school, and there are lots of state/private disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve (and, obviously, have far-reaching implications). As far as I know, none of these couples particularly foresaw disagreement, either (I hear a lot of disbelief at 'the absurd things s/he believes!')

Ok, now imagine these disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve and have far-reaching implications, about religion, in addition to whatever undiscovered disagreements that exist.  And that your children are privy to the remarks about the "absurd things" each of you believes about something as important as God, morality, values, beliefs and faith.
Do you think that makes for a serene and happy home life for the children? From personal experience, even with parents who loved each other devotedly, I can tell you that it doesn't.

Katherine, I'm saying I think people disagree, it's natural. I don't think it's even unhealthy. Btw, I don't think my friends argue in front of their children (nor, in fact, do I think they refer to 'absurd things' to each other - they're blowing off steam to me).

Quote
Quote
I don't understand the first part of what you say above - why do you think I believe that?
Then you don't believe that children should decide for themselves what religion they will be brought up in? Then who will be doing the deciding?

I'm sorry, I don't follow. I said I didn't understand why you thought I believed those things - why is this necessarily to do with children 'deciding' to follow a religion? In my experience, one doesn't 'decide' such a thing, the way you might decide to have beef for dinner - if you have faith, you have faith. Wishing it away won't make it go, and wishing for it may not be  enough to bring it back.

Quote
Quote
They are not 'either/or' alternatives, you know. I'd like to think we can progress from a rigid, 50s-style parenting model, and also avoid the other pitfalls. But perhaps I'm overly idealistic.
It hasn't worked at all well so far, so I think that you are overly idealistic.
[/quote]

Excuse me? What evidence do you have for saying my marriage isn't working well?!

I will say, one thing that has brought us into close agreement with each other is reading threads like these and finding the blueprint for exactly how *not* to parent or relate to each other!
« Last Edit: August 23, 2010, 12:50:49 PM by Liz » Logged
katherineofdixie
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« Reply #150 on: August 23, 2010, 01:35:53 PM »

Yes, you're right that big differences are more important than small ones - but actually, I think most people do have at least one area of significant disagreement, even if it doesn't emerge for quite a while. For example, lots of my friends are just getting to the age when their children need to go to school, and there are lots of state/private disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve (and, obviously, have far-reaching implications). As far as I know, none of these couples particularly foresaw disagreement, either (I hear a lot of disbelief at 'the absurd things s/he believes!')

Ok, now imagine these disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve and have far-reaching implications, about religion, in addition to whatever undiscovered disagreements that exist.  And that your children are privy to the remarks about the "absurd things" each of you believes about something as important as God, morality, values, beliefs and faith.
Do you think that makes for a serene and happy home life for the children? From personal experience, even with parents who loved each other devotedly, I can tell you that it doesn't.

Katherine, I'm saying I think people disagree, it's natural. I don't think it's even unhealthy. Btw, I don't think my friends argue in front of their children (nor, in fact, do I think they refer to 'absurd things' to each other - they're blowing off steam to me).
Yes, people disagree, as I said before, but agreement on substantive issues, especially the big ones of morality, values and beliefs is important. Unless morality, values and beliefs are situational - that is, there is no mutual agreement, only whatever one person wants to do. And you don't know that your friends don't refer to abusrd things - you are inferring. They very well may do so.
If they do, do you think it would be good for the children? From your statement, I infer that you don't think it is a good thing.

Quote
I don't understand the first part of what you say above - why do you think I believe that?
Then you don't believe that children should decide for themselves what religion they will be brought up in? Then who will be doing the deciding?

Quote
I'm sorry, I don't follow. I said I didn't understand why you thought I believed those things - why is this necessarily to do with children 'deciding' to follow a religion? In my experience, one doesn't 'decide' such a thing, the way you might decide to have beef for dinner - if you have faith, you have faith.
So how does one "get" faith? How does one even know that faith is something that one would like to know about or decide about, that faith exists and is a good thing - unless one is exposed to it.
Which will that be, for your children? Or will you leave it up to them? (you certainly don't have to answer this - it's very personal)
You, I hope, won't let them decide for themselves whether or not they will be immunized or get their teeth seen to or go to the doctor or get an education.
These are important, not optional, things - which the parents should take care of, just like ensuring that their children are brought up in a religion.
Quote
Excuse me? What evidence do you have for saying my marriage isn't working well?!
What evidence do you have that I was referring to your marriage? I was actually referring to the sorry state of society today - as I mentioned before and you responded to - we have the evidence before us.

Quote
I will say, one thing that has brought us into close agreement with each other is reading threads like these and finding the blueprint for exactly how *not* to parent or relate to each other!
Yes, why listen to people who already have children or who have been married for many years? Or who have actually grown up in a inter (or no) faith household?
How could they possibly possess insights that you lack?
« Last Edit: August 23, 2010, 01:38:06 PM by katherineofdixie » Logged

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« Reply #151 on: August 31, 2010, 04:36:12 PM »

I had to take a little while to respond to this.

Katherine, you chose to give me unsolicited advice, in the middle of a thread that someone else had started. You can hardly blame me for feeling that this is inappropriate. What upsets me more is that, although I have sought advice from my priest, you - a laywoman - have decided that your personal feelings are worthy of more consideration than the advice of our priest.

It is very difficult for me to understand how the Orthodox Church can claim to be in any way unified, when lay members take issue with the decisions of priests and bishops (yes, of course, we checked with the bishop that he approved the marriage).

I have said, earlier in this thread, that it did not seem relevant to the original topic to discuss whether or not Anglicanism is correct (since Minasomalian, who started the thread, is not Anglican and is not dating an Anglican woman). The responses on this thread seem, to me, to display a fair amount of ignorance. That is understandable, since this is an Orthodox forum, but I don't see why there is this enthusiasm to continue spreading incorrect ideas. If you look at the continuation of the thread that split from this one, sensible questions on specific issues were asked - why would that have been so difficult for you?

You seem to think that moral rectitude is a concept unique to Orthodox Christians, despite the copious theological and anecdotal evidence to the contrary. If you genuinely believe (as you argue) that Orthodox Christians are automatically morally superior, perhaps you would be more comfortable as a member of one of the evangelical 'churches'?

I hope you understand what I am trying to say. I simply cannot understand why the you think that the Orthodox Church is best served by having its most ignorant, lay members attempting to argue with ordained clergy.







Yes, you're right that big differences are more important than small ones - but actually, I think most people do have at least one area of significant disagreement, even if it doesn't emerge for quite a while. For example, lots of my friends are just getting to the age when their children need to go to school, and there are lots of state/private disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve (and, obviously, have far-reaching implications). As far as I know, none of these couples particularly foresaw disagreement, either (I hear a lot of disbelief at 'the absurd things s/he believes!')

Ok, now imagine these disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve and have far-reaching implications, about religion, in addition to whatever undiscovered disagreements that exist.  And that your children are privy to the remarks about the "absurd things" each of you believes about something as important as God, morality, values, beliefs and faith.
Do you think that makes for a serene and happy home life for the children? From personal experience, even with parents who loved each other devotedly, I can tell you that it doesn't.

Katherine, I'm saying I think people disagree, it's natural. I don't think it's even unhealthy. Btw, I don't think my friends argue in front of their children (nor, in fact, do I think they refer to 'absurd things' to each other - they're blowing off steam to me).
Yes, people disagree, as I said before, but agreement on substantive issues, especially the big ones of morality, values and beliefs is important. Unless morality, values and beliefs are situational - that is, there is no mutual agreement, only whatever one person wants to do. And you don't know that your friends don't refer to abusrd things - you are inferring. They very well may do so.
If they do, do you think it would be good for the children? From your statement, I infer that you don't think it is a good thing.

Quote
I don't understand the first part of what you say above - why do you think I believe that?
Then you don't believe that children should decide for themselves what religion they will be brought up in? Then who will be doing the deciding?

Quote
I'm sorry, I don't follow. I said I didn't understand why you thought I believed those things - why is this necessarily to do with children 'deciding' to follow a religion? In my experience, one doesn't 'decide' such a thing, the way you might decide to have beef for dinner - if you have faith, you have faith.
So how does one "get" faith? How does one even know that faith is something that one would like to know about or decide about, that faith exists and is a good thing - unless one is exposed to it.
Which will that be, for your children? Or will you leave it up to them? (you certainly don't have to answer this - it's very personal)
You, I hope, won't let them decide for themselves whether or not they will be immunized or get their teeth seen to or go to the doctor or get an education.
These are important, not optional, things - which the parents should take care of, just like ensuring that their children are brought up in a religion.
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Excuse me? What evidence do you have for saying my marriage isn't working well?!
What evidence do you have that I was referring to your marriage? I was actually referring to the sorry state of society today - as I mentioned before and you responded to - we have the evidence before us.

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I will say, one thing that has brought us into close agreement with each other is reading threads like these and finding the blueprint for exactly how *not* to parent or relate to each other!
Yes, why listen to people who already have children or who have been married for many years? Or who have actually grown up in a inter (or no) faith household?
How could they possibly possess insights that you lack?
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katherineofdixie
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« Reply #152 on: September 07, 2010, 12:15:12 PM »

I had to take a little while to respond to this.

Katherine, you chose to give me unsolicited advice, in the middle of a thread that someone else had started. You can hardly blame me for feeling that this is inappropriate.
I shared with you what it feels like for a child to grow up in a so-called "interfaith" marriage, and with research that I have read on the subject. I have challenged certain assumptions or statements that you have made, which I disagree with - isn't that the purpose of a discussion? Or have I misunderstood?
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What upsets me more is that, although I have sought advice from my priest, you - a laywoman - have decided that your personal feelings are worthy of more consideration than the advice of our priest.
Please show me where I have done this, and I will most earnestly beg your and his pardon. I don't believe that I have ever said, "ignore your priest's advice."

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It is very difficult for me to understand how the Orthodox Church can claim to be in any way unified, when lay members take issue with the decisions of priests and bishops (yes, of course, we checked with the bishop that he approved the marriage).
Again, where have I encouraged you to disobey your bishop?

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I have said, earlier in this thread, that it did not seem relevant to the original topic to discuss whether or not Anglicanism is correct (since Minasomalian, who started the thread, is not Anglican and is not dating an Anglican woman). The responses on this thread seem, to me, to display a fair amount of ignorance. That is understandable, since this is an Orthodox forum, but I don't see why there is this enthusiasm to continue spreading incorrect ideas. If you look at the continuation of the thread that split from this one, sensible questions on specific issues were asked - why would that have been so difficult for you?
Again, please show me where I have made ignorant or incorrect statements about Anglicanism, and I will apologize. While I am not a scholar of Anglican theology, I am somewhat familiar with it since I have attended Episcopal church in the past. Perhaps one problem may be that the American version (ECUSA) varies significantly from the English version.)

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You seem to think that moral rectitude is a concept unique to Orthodox Christians, despite the copious theological and anecdotal evidence to the contrary. If you genuinely believe (as you argue) that Orthodox Christians are automatically morally superior, perhaps you would be more comfortable as a member of one of the evangelical 'churches'?
Again, please let me know where I have said anything of the sort, and I will beg your pardon.

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I hope you understand what I am trying to say. I simply cannot understand why the you think that the Orthodox Church is best served by having its most ignorant, lay members attempting to argue with ordained clergy.
No, I can honestly say that I have no idea what you are trying to say, since most of what you have imputed to me is not at all what I have said or meant to say. While it is true that I am the first of sinners, do you really think that it is kind to refer to me as ignorant?
Is it not allowed for Anglicans to disagree with ordained clergy?







Yes, you're right that big differences are more important than small ones - but actually, I think most people do have at least one area of significant disagreement, even if it doesn't emerge for quite a while. For example, lots of my friends are just getting to the age when their children need to go to school, and there are lots of state/private disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve (and, obviously, have far-reaching implications). As far as I know, none of these couples particularly foresaw disagreement, either (I hear a lot of disbelief at 'the absurd things s/he believes!')

Ok, now imagine these disagreements breaking out, which are really difficult to resolve and have far-reaching implications, about religion, in addition to whatever undiscovered disagreements that exist.  And that your children are privy to the remarks about the "absurd things" each of you believes about something as important as God, morality, values, beliefs and faith.
Do you think that makes for a serene and happy home life for the children? From personal experience, even with parents who loved each other devotedly, I can tell you that it doesn't.

Katherine, I'm saying I think people disagree, it's natural. I don't think it's even unhealthy. Btw, I don't think my friends argue in front of their children (nor, in fact, do I think they refer to 'absurd things' to each other - they're blowing off steam to me).
Yes, people disagree, as I said before, but agreement on substantive issues, especially the big ones of morality, values and beliefs is important. Unless morality, values and beliefs are situational - that is, there is no mutual agreement, only whatever one person wants to do. And you don't know that your friends don't refer to abusrd things - you are inferring. They very well may do so.
If they do, do you think it would be good for the children? From your statement, I infer that you don't think it is a good thing.

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I don't understand the first part of what you say above - why do you think I believe that?
Then you don't believe that children should decide for themselves what religion they will be brought up in? Then who will be doing the deciding?

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I'm sorry, I don't follow. I said I didn't understand why you thought I believed those things - why is this necessarily to do with children 'deciding' to follow a religion? In my experience, one doesn't 'decide' such a thing, the way you might decide to have beef for dinner - if you have faith, you have faith.
So how does one "get" faith? How does one even know that faith is something that one would like to know about or decide about, that faith exists and is a good thing - unless one is exposed to it.
Which will that be, for your children? Or will you leave it up to them? (you certainly don't have to answer this - it's very personal)
You, I hope, won't let them decide for themselves whether or not they will be immunized or get their teeth seen to or go to the doctor or get an education.
These are important, not optional, things - which the parents should take care of, just like ensuring that their children are brought up in a religion.
Quote
Excuse me? What evidence do you have for saying my marriage isn't working well?!
What evidence do you have that I was referring to your marriage? I was actually referring to the sorry state of society today - as I mentioned before and you responded to - we have the evidence before us.

Quote
I will say, one thing that has brought us into close agreement with each other is reading threads like these and finding the blueprint for exactly how *not* to parent or relate to each other!
Yes, why listen to people who already have children or who have been married for many years? Or who have actually grown up in a inter (or no) faith household?
How could they possibly possess insights that you lack?
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"If but ten of us lead a holy life, we shall kindle a fire which shall light up the entire city."

 St. John Chrysostom
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