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Author Topic: Communion and Otherness  (Read 540 times) Average Rating: 0
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Twenty Nine
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« on: August 03, 2010, 09:04:24 AM »

I looked online for Zizioulas' Communion and Otherness but it is expensive. If anyone has a copy and would like to sell it, please PM me.

Many thanks,
Greg
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Finally, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. - Philippians 4:8
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« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2010, 10:51:41 AM »

I looked online for Zizioulas' Communion and Otherness but it is expensive. If anyone has a copy and would like to sell it, please PM me.

Many thanks,
Greg

Can I ask a couple of questions?

Where did you look, and why are you looking for it?


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Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)
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« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2010, 11:26:54 AM »

I am intrigued by part of the Metropolitan's Orthodoxwiki entry:

"The principle themes in Metropolitan John’s theology are freedom and otherness, both human and divine. Grounding his work in the Cappadocian Fathers and St Maximus Confessor in particular, he articulates a relational ontology in which neither unity nor plurality have priority. His Being as Communion (1985) addressed the theme from the importance of communion for unity, while his later Communion and Otherness (2007) is a complementary analysis of the importance of otherness for communion. He thus takes up the ancient philosophical problem of reconciling the One and the Many, which he examines with respect to divinity (the three Persons of the Trinity and the monarchia of the Father), humanity (theological anthropology), and the Church (ecclesiology). The philosophical implications of the book extend to the human and social sciences. A further theme of the two studies is the eschatological ontology he derives from St Maximus the Confessor, in which the truly real is that which is real at the eschaton. This is the subject of a new book by the Metropolitan to be released in summer 2008, Remembering the Future: An Eschatological Ontology."
http://orthodoxwiki.org/John_%28Zizioulas%29_of_Pergamon

There is also a very interesting abridged version of an address that the Metropolitan had given to the European Orthodox Congress in October, 1993: http://www.incommunion.org/2004/12/11/communion-and-otherness/
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Michal: "SC, love you in this thread."
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« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2010, 12:11:10 PM »

I am intrigued by part of the Metropolitan's Orthodoxwiki entry:

"The principle themes in Metropolitan John’s theology are freedom and otherness, both human and divine. Grounding his work in the Cappadocian Fathers and St Maximus Confessor in particular, he articulates a relational ontology in which neither unity nor plurality have priority. His Being as Communion (1985) addressed the theme from the importance of communion for unity, while his later Communion and Otherness (2007) is a complementary analysis of the importance of otherness for communion. He thus takes up the ancient philosophical problem of reconciling the One and the Many, which he examines with respect to divinity (the three Persons of the Trinity and the monarchia of the Father), humanity (theological anthropology), and the Church (ecclesiology). The philosophical implications of the book extend to the human and social sciences. A further theme of the two studies is the eschatological ontology he derives from St Maximus the Confessor, in which the truly real is that which is real at the eschaton. This is the subject of a new book by the Metropolitan to be released in summer 2008, Remembering the Future: An Eschatological Ontology."
http://orthodoxwiki.org/John_%28Zizioulas%29_of_Pergamon

There is also a very interesting abridged version of an address that the Metropolitan had given to the European Orthodox Congress in October, 1993: http://www.incommunion.org/2004/12/11/communion-and-otherness/

Yeah, Zizioulas appears to be trying to rehabilitate post-Hegelianism, get it out of the hands of the Mikhail Bakunin's of this world. It's a noble effort, and he's not the first. His intentions don't really matter one way or the other, however, due to the dialogical nature of his work in conversation with others on the same methodology... Nope, intentions don't really have any value in human discourse--unless self-cancellation carries value, that is. Undecided 

The problem quite naturally is that the implications of political stasis are not addresses by the Church, neither is the more general problem of entropy, where everything ends up... Which is why the foreward by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams (who is brilliant), should be taken for the structural statement that it is--by which I mean, brush up on your Thomas Hobbes first! Unless you are simply looking for new shades of sichbildung, which is also fine.   





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