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Author Topic: Saint Elias' Feast-Day  (Read 3517 times) Average Rating: 0
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augustin717
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« on: July 20, 2010, 11:15:52 AM »

This used to be and still is a very important date in many agrarian societies.
People don't work today for fear of being stricken by lightening, since it is believed that it is St. Elias that patronizes the lightening and other similar meteorological phenomena.
Honey is first collected today as well as apples, that are brought to church by people believing that in this way they will become golden apples on the other world.
Apples are also given as alms for the souls of the dead children.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2010, 11:26:23 AM by augustin717 » Logged
Shanghaiski
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« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2010, 01:29:53 PM »

It's my little godson's name day today. He likes apples and honey. And broccoli.
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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2010, 02:04:16 PM »

About St. Elijah the Prophet,Mom would tell us when there was a big thunderstorm, when we were kids ,
that he would zap demons across the heavens with lightning riding in his fiery Chariot... Grin
I don't remember anything mentioned about apples Or honey though.... Grin

 
« Last Edit: July 20, 2010, 02:20:32 PM by stashko » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2010, 02:20:08 PM »

Prophet Elias is still well-revered in many parts of Greece.  In 3 generations of my mother's extended family there are at least 12 Elias' (in addition to the more numerous Georges and Panayiotis).

Many years to those who celebrate today!
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Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)
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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2010, 02:35:02 PM »

On August 2nd, 1903 (Old calendar), which was equivalent to July 20th (New calendar), my grandfather rose up against the Turkish yoke. His village, now part of the Northern Greece Province of Macedonia, was then called Ekshi Su (sour water in Turkish) and is now called Xino Nero, just west of Amynteo in the Florina Prefecture. He was one of the original Chetniks of the Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization. The Ilinden (or Saint Elias' Day) Uprising did not succeed and the rebels and their villages were crushed. He did survive and became a successful truck gardener in Istanbul, before the entire family moved to the United States. He passed on at the age of 91. May his memory be eternal!
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« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2010, 08:14:51 PM »

I don't know how common this is, but this past weekend, I visited an OCA church and the priest reminded the parishioners that since this was the weekend closest to St. Elijah's feastday, all cars would be blessed in the parking lot.  As Elijah was taken up into heaven on a chariot, apparently that is the impetus behind this ritual.  Is this fairly common? I've never heard of such a tradition before.
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« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2010, 10:00:51 PM »

The blessing of vehicles on Sunday near the feast of the Prophet Elijah is done at my Antiochian parish. You've got me wondering now, though, when and where this custom began.
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augustin717
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« Reply #7 on: July 20, 2010, 10:05:28 PM »

It must be recent. It  might have started in the New World.
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ialmisry
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« Reply #8 on: July 20, 2010, 10:27:39 PM »

It must be recent. It  might have started in the New World.
Yes, like the car.
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« Reply #9 on: July 20, 2010, 11:02:33 PM »

I have pictures somewhere of car blessings in Russia. It's a big affair--all the doors, trunk, and hood are opened and holy water is liberally sprinkled. There's a blessing for any object, blessings for vehicles, blessing for animals and beasts of burden. It's not some sort of innovation, but an organic development of ritual.
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ialmisry
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« Reply #10 on: July 20, 2010, 11:56:10 PM »

I have pictures somewhere of car blessings in Russia. It's a big affair--all the doors, trunk, and hood are opened and holy water is liberally sprinkled. There's a blessing for any object, blessings for vehicles, blessing for animals and beasts of burden. It's not some sort of innovation, but an organic development of ritual.
I think Augustine was refering to the blessing being on St. Elijah Day.  We're not a majority Orthodox country going back centuries, so we're not allowed organic development of ritual. Roll Eyes
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Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
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If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
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augustin717
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« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2010, 12:02:53 AM »

I have pictures somewhere of car blessings in Russia. It's a big affair--all the doors, trunk, and hood are opened and holy water is liberally sprinkled. There's a blessing for any object, blessings for vehicles, blessing for animals and beasts of burden. It's not some sort of innovation, but an organic development of ritual.
I think Augustine was refering to the blessing being on St. Elijah Day.  We're not a majority Orthodox country going back centuries, so we're not allowed organic development of ritual. Roll Eyes
I didn't say or imply that.
 Some American Orthodox have actually quite developed the  ritual where they are a majority.
Like lay people kind of filling in the deacon's litany, loud anaphora etc.
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ialmisry
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« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2010, 12:34:57 AM »

I have pictures somewhere of car blessings in Russia. It's a big affair--all the doors, trunk, and hood are opened and holy water is liberally sprinkled. There's a blessing for any object, blessings for vehicles, blessing for animals and beasts of burden. It's not some sort of innovation, but an organic development of ritual.
I think Augustine was refering to the blessing being on St. Elijah Day.  We're not a majority Orthodox country going back centuries, so we're not allowed organic development of ritual. Roll Eyes
I didn't say or imply that.
 Some American Orthodox have actually quite developed the  ritual where they are a majority.
Like lay people kind of filling in the deacon's litany, loud anaphora etc.
Justinian's novella prohibited silent anaphora. Or is Justinian's empire of the Romans not enough of an Orthodox milieux, with an Orthodox majority going back centuries, for you?
Worship traditions in Armenia and the neighboring Christian East: an ... By Roberta R. Ervine
http://books.google.com/books?id=gdiZiQGDf1sC&pg=PA39&dq=Justinian+silent+prayers&hl=en&ei=THxGTI3IA8Sclgfy9oDoBA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CD0Q6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=Justinian%20silent%20prayers&f=false
Oh, btw, the inaubible prayers are a Nestorian innovation, taken so far by them that the Words of Institution have dropped out of their liturgy.

Don't know what you talking about with the deacon's litany: do you?
« Last Edit: July 21, 2010, 12:51:32 AM by ialmisry » Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
augustin717
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« Reply #13 on: July 21, 2010, 12:52:50 AM »

And the Americans inherited the loud Anaphora straight from Justinian.
"LOL" to cite you.
It is liturgical archeology. Coming from  "Le nouvel mouvement liturgique".
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ialmisry
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« Reply #14 on: July 21, 2010, 01:25:05 AM »

And the Americans inherited the loud Anaphora straight from Justinian.

He just sets a good example they follow.

Quote
"LOL" to cite you.
It is liturgical archeology. Coming from  "Le nouvel mouvement liturgique".
No, coming from the Novellae. If you'd read, Justinian is quite clear that he is restoring a usage fallen into disuse (earlier in the book it shows that loud Anaphora is the ancient usage, and the correct one for a variety of reasons, some of which the Emperor cites).

Liturgical archeology by a cradle, from your neck of the woods no less, in a majority Orthodox country going back centuries. Oh, the horror!

Btw, look on your liturgical calendar for "invention": it's liturgical for "archeology."

Just curious, have you removed Deutronomy from your Bible?  And while I'm curious, what ARE you talking about with lay litanies?
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Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
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« Reply #15 on: July 22, 2010, 02:38:28 AM »

On August 2nd, 1903 (Old calendar), which was equivalent to July 20th (New calendar), my grandfather rose up against the Turkish yoke. His village, now part of the Northern Greece Province of Macedonia, was then called Ekshi Su (sour water in Turkish) and is now called Xino Nero, just west of Amynteo in the Florina Prefecture. He was one of the original Chetniks of the Internal Macedonian Revolutionary Organization. The Ilinden (or Saint Elias' Day) Uprising did not succeed and the rebels and their villages were crushed. He did survive and became a successful truck gardener in Istanbul, before the entire family moved to the United States. He passed on at the age of 91. May his memory be eternal!

May his memory be eternal!

107 years from the Ilinden-Preobrazhenie (Saint Elias' Day-Transfiguration) Uprising. May the memory of all those who fell for the liberation of Macedonia and Eastern Thrace from the Turkish yoke be eternal!
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« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2010, 12:15:26 AM »

On August 2, Elijah's feast day, traditionally Palestinians would travel to the St Elijah's monastery several miles from Bethlehem.

I read in the internet article "Who's a Christian in the Holy Land"?
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"Flight of Elijah: The (5th-6th century) Greek Orthodox monastery Mar Elias is between Jerusalem and Bethlehem. According to (one) legend, the monastery recalls the site where Elijah rested on his flight from the vengeance of queen Jezabel (1 Kings 19)."

Would anyone be able to say the likelihood that the monastery was built on this site? The sense from the legend connecting the monastery to the site would be that the monastery was built there for this reason.
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