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Author Topic: The true meaning of the Arabic greeting, Marhaba  (Read 65249 times) Average Rating: 5
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Tamara
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« on: June 24, 2010, 12:25:54 AM »

An Syrian friend sent this information to me and I wanted to share it with everyone.
Sometimes we forget the original blessings that came with the common greetings
we still use today. It is part of our Orthodox Christian treasure of heritage.

The real meaning of “MARHABA”

Marhaba....

Marhaba is an Arabic  word  used in the Middle East   as “Hello”.

But most people  don't know its source

 

Marhaba comes from a Syriac (Aramaic, Assyrian) origin and was used by the first Christians

 

Mar = Master or God

Haba =Love

 

Marhaba = God is love



إن كلمة "مرحبا" هي كلمة قديمة ذات أصول آرامية

استخدمها المسيحيون الأوائل من السريان وهي ذات شقين

الأول "مار" ومعناها سيد أو رب و"حبا" ومعناها محبة

وهي عبارة تعنى:


"الله محبة"



So ..... Marhaba!!
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Orthodox11
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« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2011, 06:59:52 AM »

I always assumed it comes from the Arabic verb rahaba, 'to welcome'.
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GabrieltheCelt
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« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2012, 02:33:47 PM »

Very cool!  Shukran!

I think to welcome someone is something like, "Ahlan wa sahlan".
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« Reply #3 on: March 24, 2012, 02:36:56 PM »

Also,

 Most folks know the word "Hajj" and "Hajji" to mean a Muslim who has taken the pilgrimage to Mecca.  But did you know that this word was originally an Arab Orthodox word for a Christian who took the pilgrimage to Jerusalem?  Isa can tell you the many derivatives we have today that are found in Eastern Orthodox Christian lands such as Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, etc...
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« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2012, 03:32:13 PM »

But did you know that this word was originally an Arab Orthodox word for a Christian who took the pilgrimage to Jerusalem?  Isa can tell you the many derivatives we have today that are found in Eastern Orthodox Christian lands such as Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, etc...

It is a very common name among Orthodox Christians, and does indeed signify pilgrimage to Jerusalem. But is there any evidence to suggest that this is practice pre-dates Islam among the Orthodox?
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« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2012, 04:23:46 PM »

But did you know that this word was originally an Arab Orthodox word for a Christian who took the pilgrimage to Jerusalem?  Isa can tell you the many derivatives we have today that are found in Eastern Orthodox Christian lands such as Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, etc...

It is a very common name among Orthodox Christians, and does indeed signify pilgrimage to Jerusalem. But is there any evidence to suggest that this is practice pre-dates Islam among the Orthodox?

 Great question!  Unfortunately, I'm not 100% positive, but because Muhammad "borrowed" so many of our traditions, it wouldn't surprise me.  When Isa sees this, he'll be able to answer.
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« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2012, 05:10:19 PM »

here is how you pronounce it:

http://www.forvo.com/word/marhaba/
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« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2012, 05:24:35 PM »

But did you know that this word was originally an Arab Orthodox word for a Christian who took the pilgrimage to Jerusalem?  Isa can tell you the many derivatives we have today that are found in Eastern Orthodox Christian lands such as Greece, Romania, Bulgaria, etc...

It is a very common name among Orthodox Christians, and does indeed signify pilgrimage to Jerusalem. But is there any evidence to suggest that this is practice pre-dates Islam among the Orthodox?
Yes.  It is the same word in Hebrew used for the pilgrimage to Jerusalem for the three feasts (Shukot, Pascha, Pentecost), so used in Aramaic/Syriac and passed to its cognate in Arabic.  The Arab philologists (predominantly Muslim) are agreed that the meaning of the word as restricted to Mecca is later, with the imposition of Muslim law (for those who do not know, the Muslims, based on the Quran, admit that their first direction for prayer was towards Jerusalem, and was only changed later).  As for its use before Islam outside of the Middle East, no, I don't think any exists as I don't think it was used by anyone outside of the Semitic Orthodox until after the conquest of Jerusalem.  The form of the Greek I think would indicate it being borrowed around the time of the Great Schism with the Vatican.  
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