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Author Topic: learning Old Church Slavonic  (Read 4639 times) Average Rating: 0
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ialmisry
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« Reply #45 on: July 01, 2010, 11:45:11 AM »

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Quite large, actually. Church Slavonic lacks the nasal vowels and most of the reduced vowels of Old Church Slavonic, the tense and aspect system has been restructured, and some consonants have been changed to fit the norms of local dialects.

Just to clarify as someone who has studied Old Church Slavonic at University and used Lunt's text book:
The reason some may think Old Church Slavonic lacks vowels etc. is because originally the soft sign and hard sign were pronounced vowels.

Also for people who know Romance languages understanding Latin: modern Romance languages do not decline/ has cases for nouns as in Latin.

Romanian does. It's also the only Romance language that has a neuter gender

Quote
 So vocabulary may sound familiar but the use of cases is confusing to those who do not know Latin grammar.  

Totally off topic but being Canadian and learning required French from public school when I was in Romania I notice simularity in vocabulary but the articles are attached the end of the noun not set before the beginning of a noun as in French.
Yes, Romanian differs from the other Romance languages, but resembles the Slavic languages in the Balkans with a definite article, in this.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2010, 11:47:30 AM by ialmisry » Logged

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« Reply #46 on: July 01, 2010, 02:17:45 PM »

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Yes, Romanian differs from the other Romance languages, but resembles the Slavic languages in the Balkans with a definite article, in this.

Do you mean modern Bulgarian and Macedonian by "the Slavic languages in the Balkans with a definite article"?  Or are there other South Slavic Balkan languages with a definite article?
« Last Edit: July 01, 2010, 02:19:02 PM by Orest » Logged
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« Reply #47 on: July 01, 2010, 02:23:49 PM »

It's a feature of the so-called "balkansprachbund", shared by Bulgarian, Romanian and Albanian. Other features are shared with Greek, as well.
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ialmisry
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« Reply #48 on: July 01, 2010, 02:33:22 PM »

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Yes, Romanian differs from the other Romance languages, but resembles the Slavic languages in the Balkans with a definite article, in this.

Do you mean modern Bulgarian and Macedonian by "the Slavic languages in the Balkans with a definite article"?  Or are there other South Slavic Balkan languages with a definite article?
No, they're the only ones as far as I know period in the Slavic languages. As Augustine said, its the sprachbund. Another feature, one from phonetics, is that Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian and Albanian have a stressed schwa ə, something unusual among languages.
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« Reply #49 on: July 01, 2010, 09:58:08 PM »

No, they're the only ones as far as I know period in the Slavic languages. As Augustine said, its the sprachbund. Another feature, one from phonetics, is that Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian and Albanian have a stressed schwa ə, something unusual among languages.

A stressed vowel ə is not at all unusual among languages. I can name half a dozen languages off the top of my head that have it (English, Mari, Chuvash, Tatar, Kazakh and Nenets)
« Last Edit: July 01, 2010, 09:59:38 PM by CRCulver » Logged
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« Reply #50 on: July 02, 2010, 01:26:26 PM »

I'd really like to teach myself the fundamentals of the Slavonic language. 

is it a totally impossible feat to try and teach myself this language?  I have nothing to do all summer, and I have a real knack for languages.  (I'm in honors French II and honors Italian I)

plus, I have a very close friend at church who says she can read half of the language, so she could be valuable up to a certain point. 

I am also going to get this book: http://www.amazon.com/Church-Slavonic-Grammar-Horace-Lunt/dp/3110162849/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276752721&sr=8-2

does anyone have any opinions about it?

thanks! or should I say Dzieki!

Here you can find some self-study textbooks of Church Slavonic:
http://azbyka.ru/tserkov/tserkovno-slavyanskiy/uchebnye_posobiya/index.shtml     
(in Russian)

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