Author Topic: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011  (Read 4685 times)

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Offline 88Devin12

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New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« on: June 07, 2010, 09:12:05 PM »
Saw the video posted on Fr. Joseph Honeycutt's blog, Orthodixie. I decided to visit the website, looks like it will be a wonderful film!

http://www.mysteriesofthejesusprayer.com/

http://www.youtube.com/watch#!v=Zjub9vxQ0NM

Offline Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)

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Re: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2010, 10:35:32 AM »
There are more trailers at http://www.u2download.com/download-watch-video-mcguckin.htm. They are introduced by words such as:

- Norris and Father John witness a magnificent gathering and the arrival of Patriarch Kyril on the day of the Feast of the Holy Trinity at the Sergiev Posad in Moscow, Russia

-Father Maxim takes Father John and Norris down to the mysterious ancient caves (Verenetsky Caves) where monks used to live and pray centuries ago.

- Norris and Father John share a moment with Father Pasij, a monk at St. Jonas monastery in Kiev, Ukraine.

- Norris and Father John visit Abbess Josephina at Varatec monastery in Romania

- Norris and Father John visit the Greek island Serifos, where they meet Father Makarious, the last remaining monk at Taxiarches Monastery.

- Dr. Norris Chumley and V.Rev. John McGuckin visit Mount Sinai and speak with Father Neilos at St. Catherine's Monastery.

Offline Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)

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Re: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2010, 10:38:46 AM »
The  Very Reverend Doctor John Mcguckin is an Orthodox priest according to Wiki and has an impressive cv. I am copying some of the info.

John Anthony McGuckin (born 1952) is an Orthodox Christian  scholar, priest, and poet.

He was raised Roman Catholic and at 19 became a member of the Passionist religious order. In 1989 McGuckin became Greek Orthodox and was ordained a priest for the Romanian Orthodox Church, now serving at the St. Gregory the Theologian Orthodox Chaplaincy in Manhattan. He has written important scholarly books on Cyril of Alexandria, Gregory of Nazianzus, and Origen, among others. His work has ranged over the areas of New Testament interpretation, Patristics, Byzantine History, and Orthodox theology.

McGuckin attended Heythrop College from 1970 to 1972, graduated from the University of London with a Divinity degree in 1975, and received a Certificate in Education from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1979, his PhD from Durham University in 1980, and an MA in Educational Studies from the University of Southampton in 1986.
[edit] Professional life and affiliations

A former Reader in Patristic and Byzantine Theology at the University of Leeds, McGuckin is the Nielsen Professor of Early Church History at Union Theological Seminary and Professor of Byzantine Christian Studies at Columbia University in New York City.

He is a Fellow of both the Royal Society of Arts and the Royal Historical Society. He is the Director of the Sophia Institute:International Center for Orthodox Thought and Culture, which has its offices on the Union Seminary campus in Manhattan. In 1992 He was given the award of the Brotherhood of Peter Mohyla for his educational services at the Mohyla Academy in the newly independent Ukraine. He was awarded the Gold Cross of Moldavia and Bukovina by the Romanian Patriarch Daniel in 2007 for his services to the Church and the Academy.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Anthony_McGuckin

Offline BoredMeeting

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Re: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2010, 11:09:28 AM »
"In 1989 McGuckin became Greek Orthodox and was ordained a priest for the Romanian Orthodox Church..."
Beg pardon?  ???

Offline FatherGiryus

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Re: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« Reply #4 on: June 08, 2010, 11:14:15 AM »
This looks to be a really good effort.  Hope we can get more movies like this!
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Offline mike

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Re: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2010, 04:50:47 AM »
"In 1989 McGuckin became Greek Orthodox and was ordained a priest for the Romanian Orthodox Church..."
Beg pardon?  ???

They meant: 'became Eastern Orthodox" I suppose.
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Offline BoredMeeting

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Re: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2010, 09:20:49 AM »
"In 1989 McGuckin became Greek Orthodox and was ordained a priest for the Romanian Orthodox Church..."
Beg pardon?  ???
They meant: 'became Eastern Orthodox" I suppose.
Yeah, but it's still kind of funny when they make that slip.

Offline pensateomnia

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Re: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« Reply #7 on: June 09, 2010, 10:34:29 AM »
"In 1989 McGuckin became Greek Orthodox and was ordained a priest for the Romanian Orthodox Church..."
Beg pardon?  ???

They meant: 'became Eastern Orthodox" I suppose.

"Greek Orthodox" was, for many generations, a common term for all members of what many people now call the Eastern Orthodox Churches, regardless of ethnicity or jurisdiction. You'll find it so used in many 17th, 18th, 19th and early 20th century publications (and, of course, in manuscripts from circa 600s onwards). Everything from encyclopedias to academic books to newspapers, both in British/American sources, as well as in many sources from Orthodox themselves (but with decreasing frequency starting in the 18th century and then largely disappearing after the rise of nationalism).

The usage persisted in English (especially British English), though, until relatively recently, because it maintains the clear distinctions among Greek Orthodox, Latin Catholic, Greek Catholic, and other eastern (Assyrian or Non-Chalcedonian) Orthodox Christians.

For example, an article from Feb 15, 1911 in the New York Times about a church in Russia is headlined: "Entire Russian Parish Stayed Awake and Fasted Six Days to Get Priest Reinstated," but the intro paragraph reads: "Fanatical scenes are being witnessed here, where the whole Greek Orthodox parish is suffering self-imposed deprivations..."

Same thing is true of many articles about the Russian Mission in America. The Times' Oct 1, 1868 article is headlined "Establishment of the Greek Church in San Francisco," talking about the very first celebration of the Divine Liturgy in the city by Fr. Kovriguin, having been sent by the "Sclavonian" Bishop of Sitka (Slavs were called Sclavs for centuries), which Liturgy was conducted solely in the "Sclavonian language" with the intention to establish a permanent Greek Church. Confused yet? No need to be, if we understand the usage of the time.

As the article in 1868 points out, there are Greek and there are Catholic Churches. That was the major distinction drawn by the usage, both by Orthodox themselves and by non-Orthodox. By writing "Greek Orthodox," it's very clear that you are talking about Byzantine Rite Christians in communion with the ancient Orthodox Patriarchates. It's also clearly different from "Greek Catholics" or "Latins," or "Easterners" in general, which often referred to Assyrian or other Syriac-speaking Christians. Even today, in academic circles, the study of "Eastern Christianity" often means studying Syriac (usually Church of the East) or Non-Chalcedonian sources. Hence, why the Antiochians are self-styled as the "Greek Orthodox Church of Antioch," clearly distinguishing them from the other eastern Orthodox churches in the region.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2010, 10:57:36 AM by pensateomnia »
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Offline Orthodox11

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Re: New Movie about the Jesus Prayer - Early 2011
« Reply #8 on: June 09, 2010, 10:58:59 AM »
I know quite a few Romanians (clergy included) who refer to themselves as "Greek Orthodox." Georgians even more so.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2010, 10:59:51 AM by Orthodox11 »