OrthodoxChristianity.net
September 02, 2014, 04:29:39 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Last Patriarch of Rome?  (Read 2552 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« on: May 27, 2010, 04:00:14 PM »

Who was the last Patriarch of Rome?

edit: Yes, the last Bishop of Rome from the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. The last one who was listed in the dyptychs of the other local Churches.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 04:24:53 PM by mike » Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,483



« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2010, 04:22:00 PM »

Who was the last Patriarch of Rome?
You mean the last Orthodox one?
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 04:22:16 PM by ialmisry » Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
Andrew21091
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 1,268



« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2010, 04:26:16 PM »

I think it would have probably been Pope Damasus II since after him was Leo IX who was Pope during the Great Schism.
Logged
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2010, 04:33:10 PM »

I think it would have probably been Pope Damasus II since after him was Leo IX who was Pope during the Great Schism.

Wasn't the Bishop of Rome excluded from the dyptychs about 20-30 years earlier?
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 04:33:31 PM by mike » Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Warned
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 37,483



« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2010, 05:19:58 PM »

I think it would have probably been Pope Damasus II since after him was Leo IX who was Pope during the Great Schism.

Wasn't the Bishop of Rome excluded from the dyptychs about 20-30 years earlier?
yes, when the Frankish emperor forced the pope of Rome to put the filioque in.  The pope diappears from the diptychs of Constatinople from 1009
http://books.google.com/books?id=f7D-5Q-Q19MC&pg=PA57&dq=orthodox+church+ware+diptych&cd=1#v=onepage&q&f=false

There is some debate, however, if he was removed from the diptychs in Antioch, for instance, before 1724 permanently.

So the answer I guess would depend on whether the striking of the pope from one diptych would mean the last patriarch Sergius IV, or if it has to be more widespread than one local Church.  The traditional date and answer Leo IX, is good enough, because then the patriarch was not only persisting in heresy, but insisting the other patriarchs adhere to it as well.
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
Deacon Lance
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Byzantine Catholic
Jurisdiction: Archeparchy of Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,891


Liturgy at Mt. St. Macrina Pilgrimage


« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2010, 05:24:59 PM »

Pope St. Zacharias is the last Pope to be recognized as a saint by the Orthodox.  Pope Sergius IV was the last before the Filioque was inserted at Rome.
Logged

My cromulent posts embiggen this forum.
stashko
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: ИСТОЧНИ ПРАВОСЛАВНИ СРБИН
Jurisdiction: Non Ecumenist Free Serbian Orthodox Church
Posts: 4,998


Wonderworking Sitka Icon


« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2010, 05:45:10 PM »

Total in numbers please, Like How Many popes does the Orthodox Church recognize as Orthodox and as saints .... Huh
Logged

ГОСПОДЕ ГОСПОДЕ ,ПОГЛЕДАЈ СА НЕБА ,ДОЂИ И ПОСЕТИ ТВОЈ ВИНОГРАД ТВОЈА ДЕСНИЦА ПОСАДИЛА АМИН АМИН.
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2010, 05:49:30 PM »

Total in numbers please, Like How Many popes does the Orthodox Church recognize as Orthodox and as saints .... Huh

68

Thank you for the answers.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 05:49:57 PM by mike » Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
stashko
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: ИСТОЧНИ ПРАВОСЛАВНИ СРБИН
Jurisdiction: Non Ecumenist Free Serbian Orthodox Church
Posts: 4,998


Wonderworking Sitka Icon


« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2010, 05:55:58 PM »

That's Quite a lot of popes,[ WOW]   I really Don't Have a Great Love For Any of the Western Popes...  Are they all listed on the Orthodox Church Feast Calendar... Grin
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 05:58:09 PM by stashko » Logged

ГОСПОДЕ ГОСПОДЕ ,ПОГЛЕДАЈ СА НЕБА ,ДОЂИ И ПОСЕТИ ТВОЈ ВИНОГРАД ТВОЈА ДЕСНИЦА ПОСАДИЛА АМИН АМИН.
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2010, 06:00:23 PM »

That's Quite a lot of popes,[ WOW]   I really Don't Have a Great Love For Any of the Western Popes...  Are they all listed on the Orthodox Church Feast Calendar... Grin

Read that: http://www.orthodoxengland.btinternet.co.uk/ortpopes.htm and stop trolling, please.
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
stashko
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: ИСТОЧНИ ПРАВОСЛАВНИ СРБИН
Jurisdiction: Non Ecumenist Free Serbian Orthodox Church
Posts: 4,998


Wonderworking Sitka Icon


« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2010, 06:03:27 PM »

Mike! So when is asking questions considered trolling....Humm Hummm Grin
Logged

ГОСПОДЕ ГОСПОДЕ ,ПОГЛЕДАЈ СА НЕБА ,ДОЂИ И ПОСЕТИ ТВОЈ ВИНОГРАД ТВОЈА ДЕСНИЦА ПОСАДИЛА АМИН АМИН.
mike
Stratopedarches
**************
Offline Offline

Posts: 21,467


WWW
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2010, 06:16:43 PM »

Mike! So when is asking questions considered trolling....Humm Hummm Grin

It's the way I receive your posts. Maybe it's because both or us are non-native English speakers? Maybe because you use many emoticons that make me to see your posts ironic?

I apologise to you as my interpretations were wrong.
Logged

Byzantinism
no longer posting here
Andrew21091
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 1,268



« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2010, 06:17:16 PM »

I think it would have probably been Pope Damasus II since after him was Leo IX who was Pope during the Great Schism.

Wasn't the Bishop of Rome excluded from the dyptychs about 20-30 years earlier?

I stand corrected.
Logged
stashko
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: ИСТОЧНИ ПРАВОСЛАВНИ СРБИН
Jurisdiction: Non Ecumenist Free Serbian Orthodox Church
Posts: 4,998


Wonderworking Sitka Icon


« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2010, 06:22:10 PM »

Mike! So when is asking questions considered trolling....Humm Hummm Grin

It's the way I receive your posts. Maybe it's because both or us are non-native English speakers? Maybe because you use many emoticons that make me to see your posts ironic?

I apologise to you as my interpretations were wrong.

Све Је Уреду...Брате...

Everything is fine Mike no offence taken .... Grin


Thank You ! for the link will study it ....SLava Bogu...
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 06:27:02 PM by stashko » Logged

ГОСПОДЕ ГОСПОДЕ ,ПОГЛЕДАЈ СА НЕБА ,ДОЂИ И ПОСЕТИ ТВОЈ ВИНОГРАД ТВОЈА ДЕСНИЦА ПОСАДИЛА АМИН АМИН.
Irish Hermit
Kibernetski Kaludjer
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,991


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us


« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2010, 06:44:31 PM »

Total in numbers please, Like How Many popes does the Orthodox Church recognize as Orthodox and as saints .... Huh

Total in numbers please, Like How Many popes does the Orthodox Church recognize as Orthodox and as saints .... Huh

The Holy Orthodox Popes of Rome


http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/ortpopes.htm



In this present short work it is our aim to present a full list of the holy
popes of Rome, a work which to our knowledge has never been carried out
before in its Orthodox context. We feel that this task is particularly
valuable at the present time for two reasons:


Firstly, Rome remains the historic centre of the Western Patriarchate and
remains a holy place of Orthodox pilgrimage after that Patriarchate ceased
to confess Orthodoxy. Indeed, the very word 'pope' is Greek, meaning
'father' and to this day the official title of the Patriarch of Alexandria
remains 'Pope of Alexandria'. Some fifteen popes were Greek and another six
Syrian and the first Latin pope was St Victor (+ 198).


Secondly, although Rome has not been an Orthodox centre for a thousand years
and has often ferociously attacked the Orthodox Church since then, it has
nevertheless conserved important vestiges of Orthodoxy. However, with the
passing of time, it seems to be losing these vestiges, abandoning even its
saints. Some Roman Catholics themselves today doubt the survival of what for
us are vestiges of Orthodoxy much into the third millennium. It would seem
to us therefore that the following list would be useful for all.


Let us ask the prayers of these holy Orthodox popes of Rome of the first
millennium, asking that, through their prayers, Rome and all it once
represented and all that remains there of Orthodoxy may, with the third
millennium, yet return to the Orthodox Faith of the first millennium. Let us
pray that papal supremacy may one day become again papal primacy in its
Orthodox sense. In praying to the past, we pray for the future, in calling
on these Western Patriarchs, we pray for the salvation of the West, we pray
for a West with saints, not a West without saints. And who will pray, if not
we Orthodox?


We would remind readers that St. Peter was never a pope of Rome, indeed he
was not a bishop at all, but an Apostle. This is the early tradition of the
Church of Rome itself and therefore remains the tradition of the rest of the
Orthodox Church today. Moreover St. Peter founded not the Church of Rome,
but the Church of Antioch. The Church in Rome was founded by St. Paul. This
is clear to any reader of the Acts of the Apostles and the Epistle of St.
Paul to the Romans. In the following list, popes who already appear in all
Eastern Orthodox calendars are marked with an asterisk.


St. Linus (+ c. 78), first pope, Martyr. A disciple of the Apostle Paul, he
was consecrated by him. One of the Seventy Apostles, he is mentioned in 2
Timothy 4,21. He was pope for about twelve years and may have been martyred.
Feast: 23 September (In the East 4 January and 5 November). *


St. Anacletus (Cletus) (+ c. 91), by origin a Greek from Athens and possibly
a martyr. His name, correctly Anencletus, means 'blameless' (see Titus 1,7)
and he may originally have been a slave. Feast: 26 April.


St. Clement of Rome (+ c. 101), martyr. One of the Seventy Apostles and a
Church Father, he was consecrated by the Apostle Peter. He is mentioned in
Philippians 4,3 and his letter to the Church of Corinth still exists. He was
much venerated in the West in the early centuries and still today in the
East. The church of San Clemente in Rome probably stands on the site of his
house. According to tradition, he was banished to the Crimea and there
martyred. Feast: 23 November (in the East 4 January, 22 April, 10 September
and 25 November). *


St. Evaristus (+ c. 109), perhaps a martyr and almost certainly of
Hellenic/Jewish origin. Feast: 26 October.


St. Alexander I (+ c. 116), the fifth pope and possible a martyr and by
tradition a Roman. Feast: 3 March (in the East 16 March).*


St. Sixtus (Xystus) I (+ c. 125), possibly a martyr. A Roman of Greek
origin. Feast: 3 April. *


St Telesphorus (+ c. 136), a martyr, Greek by origin. Feast: 5 January (in
the East 22 February). *


St. Hyginus (+ c. 142), by origin a Greek philosopher from Athens. Also
perhaps a martyr. Feast: 11 January.


St. Pius I (+ c. 155), from Aquilea, probably born a slave and perhaps the
brother of Hermas who wrote 'The Shepherd'. He defended the Church against
Gnosticism. Possibly a martyr. Feast: 11 July.


St. Anicetus (+ 166) the tenth pope and of Syrian origin, he fixed the date
of Easter, opposed the Gnostics, perhaps martyred. Feast: 17 April.


St. Soter (+ 174), of Greek descent, he may have been martyred. Feast: 22
April.


St. Eleutherius (+ 189), Greek, possibly martyred. Feast: 26 May.


St. Victor (+ 198), an African and the first Latin pope. A forceful
character, he fought for Orthodoxy and against Gnosticism. He may have been
martyred. Feast: 28 July. *


St. Zephyrinus (+ 217), of Greek descent. Although not a strong character,
he still fought for Orthodoxy against Adoptionism and Modalism and may have
been martyred for it. Feast: 26 August.


St. Callistus I (+ 222), the fifteenth pope and originally a slave. Pope
Callistus, with his Greek name, was known for his mercifulness and defended
married clergy against fanatics. He condemned modalism. Probably martyred.
Feast: 14 October.


St. Urban I (+ 230), Roman, possibly martyred. Feast: 25 May.


St. Pontian (+ 235), Roman, he was persecuted for the faith and deported to
Sardinia, where he died as a confessor. Feast: 19 November.


St. Antherus (+ 236), Greek and perhaps martyred. Feast: 3 January (5 August
in East). *


St. Fabian (+ 250), Roman martyr. Described as an incomparable man, 'his
death matched the purity and goodness of his life', he did much to help the
poor. Feast: 20 January (5 August in the East). *


St. Cornelius (+ 253), the twentieth pope and a Roman, he was greatly helped
by St Cyprian of Carthage in the struggle against novatian fanaticism. He
was renowned for his mercifulness and died as a result of persecution.
Feast: 16 September.


St. Lucius (+ 254), a Roman he was exiled as soon as he was elected in a
persecution. Supported by St Cyprian, he was certainly a confessor and
perhaps was martyred. Feast: 4 March.


St. Stephen I (+ 257), a Roman and a strong character, perhaps a martyr, he
is well known for his argument with St Cyprian of Carthage about the baptism
of heretics. St Stephen defended the view of economy, that invalid baptism
outside the Church was made valid by entry into the Church, and there was no
need to repeat the actual rite. Feast: 2 August. *


St. Sixtus II (+ 258), an Athenian. He was 'a good and peace-loving man' who
was much helped by Dionysius, Bishop of Alexandria. He was martyred by
beheading, together with his seven deacons, one of whom was St Lawrence. He
was and is greatly venerated in the Orthodox Church, West and also East.
Feast: 7 August (10 August in the East). *


St. Dionysius (Denis) (+ 268), one of the most important Roman popes of the
third century. He was a learned Greek, who opposed several heresies, helped
the persecuted and also reorganized the Church in Rome. Feast: 26 December.


St. Felix I (+ 274), the twenty-fifth pope. A Roman, he opposed the
adoptianist heresy. Feast: 30 May.


St. Eutychian (+ 283), a native of Tuscany. Feast: 7 December.


St. Gaius (+ 296), possibly from Dalmatia. It seems that he was martyred
together with his brother, a priest, and his children. Feast: 22 April (11
August in the East). *


St. Marcellinus (+ 304), possibly a martyr, and certainly a penitent for
previous errors and apostasy. Feast: 2 June (7 June in the East). *


St. Marcellus I (+ 309), a confessor who died as a result of persecution.
Feast: 16 January (7 June in the East). *


St. Eusebius (+ 310), the thirtieth pope and a Greek by origin. He was
deported to Sicily by the Emperor and died there as a confessor. Feast: 17
August.


St. Miltiades (+ 314), probably from Rome, although he had a Greek name. The
Emperor Constantine gave him a palace on the Lateran as his residence. He
condemned Donatism. Feast: 10 December.


St. Sylvester I (+ 335), Roman. Feast: 31 December (2 January in the East).
*


St. Mark (+ 336), Roman. Feast: 7 October.


St. Julius I (+ 352), Roman. A defender of St. Athanasius, this most
Orthodox Pope condemned arianism. Feast: 12 April.


St. Liberius (+ 366). The thirty-fifth pope, he was not of strong character
and even compromised the Faith at one point in his life, confessing
arianism. However, like St Marcellinus, he then repented, atoned and is
recognised as a saint of God. Feast: 27 August. *


St. Damasus (+ 384). Of Spanish origin, he was born in Rome in c. 305, the
son of a priest. He fought for Orthodoxy and opposed several heresies. He
did much to establish the Latin text of the Bible, developed the liturgy and
the veneration of the Roman martyrs. Although as a new pope, he made several
arrogant errors, he repented for these and was recognized as a saint at the
end. Feast: 11 December.


St. Siricius (+ 399), Roman. An imperious man like St Damasus, he
nevertheless forbade the harsh treatment of heretics and supported ascetics.
He received the support of St Ambrose of Milan and opposed those who
slandered the Mother of God. Feast: 26 November.


St. Anastasius I (+ 401). A man of poverty and apostolic mind, he did much
to stop the spread of origenism. Feast: 19 December.


St Innocent I (+ 417). The son of St Anastasius I, he had an imperious
character and thirty-six letters of his survive. He supported St John
Chrysostom and condemned pelagianism. Feast: 28 July.


St Zosimus (+ 418), the fortieth Pope, by origin a Greek. Although initially
he made many errors of tact and judgement, he was anti-pelagian. Feast: 26
December.


St Boniface I (+ 422), a Roman and son of a priest. He was kind, humble and
fought for Orthodoxy. Feast: 4 September.


St Celestine I (+ 432). A strong character, he was active against
pelagianism, he sent St. Germanus of Auxerre to Britain and St. Palladius to
Ireland. He also strongly opposed nestorianism and supported St Cyril of
Alexandria. Feast: 6 April (8 April in the East). *


St Sixtus III (+ 440), Roman. He vigorously opposed the heresies of both
Pelagius and Nestorius. Feast: 28 March.


St. Leo I, 'the Great' (+ 461). He was born in Rome at the end of the fourth
century. He was very energetic, opposed many heresies and protected Rome
from the barbarian Huns and Vandals. His teaching on Christ was acclaimed by
all the Orthodox at the Council of Chalcedon in 451. Feast: 11 April (In the
East 18 February) *.


St. Hilary (+ 468), the forty-fifth pope and by origin Sardinian, he
actively opposed many heresies. Feast: 28 February.


St. Simplicius (+ 483), he supported the Orthodox in the East against
monophysitism. Feast: 10 March.


St. Felix II (+ 492), the son of a priest, he was also the grandfather of
St. Gregory the Great. He sternly opposed monophysitism. Feast: 1 March.


St. Gelasius I (+ 496), African, but born in Rome. He helped the poor and
was sternly opposed monophysitism. Of imperious character, he put the
authority of the Pope on the same level as that of the Emperor. We have from
him over a hundred letters or fragments and six theological works. He was
the greatest Pope of the fifth century after St Leo. Feast: 21 November.


St. Anastasius II (+ 498), Roman and the son of a priest, he had a
conciliatory character. Feast: 8 September/19 November.


St. Symmachus (+ 514), the fiftieth pope and by origin Sardinian, he was
very active and a builder of churches. Feast: 19 July.


St. Hormisdas (+ 523), from Italy and father of St. Silverius (see below),
he helped end the monophysite schism. Feast: 6 August.


St. John I (+ 526), Tuscan. A confessor, he suffered much from the Arian
Goth Theodoric, King of Italy. He was immediately revered as a saint on his
repose. Feast: 18 May.


St. Felix III (+ 530), the fifty-third pope and saint in succession, he was
greatly loved for his simplicity and almsgiving. He was succeeded by
Boniface II, who was the first pope of Germanic origin, and John II, neither
of whom is considered a saint. John II was the first pope to change names on
assuming that office. Feast: 22 September.


St. Agapitus I (+ 536), the son of a priest, he opposed monophysitism and
reposed in Constantinople. Feast: 22 April and 20 September (In the East 17
April). *


St. Silverius (+ 537), he was exiled to Asia Minor as a result of political
intrigues. He later died in exile from starvation and various hardships and
injustices. He was venerated as a martyr for Orthodoxy. He was succeeded by
five popes who are not saints. Feast: 20 June.


St. Gregory I, 'the Great' (in the East 'the Dialogist') (+ 604). One of
only two popes to be called 'the Great' (with St. Leo), this able and
energetic saint was possibly the greatest of all Roman popes. Known as 'the
Apostle of the English', he also did much to convert the Lombards and the
Goths. A true monk and ascetic, he wrote much about the monastic life, and
was greatly concerned for liturgical life and the poor. Some 850 of his
letters survive as well as other extremely important patristic and pastoral
works, especially his Dialogues. Notably, he condemned as 'antichrist' any
bishop who claimed universal jurisdiction and supremacy. Feast: 12 March. *


Boniface IV (+ 615). A follower of St Gregory the Great, he was also a true
monk. Preceded by two popes who are not saints. Feast: 25 May.


Deusdedit I (+ 618), Roman. 'Simple, devout, wise and shrewd', he loved
ordinary priests and did much for those then suffering from the plague. He
was succeeded by five popes who are not saints. Feast: 8 November.


St. Martin I (+ 655), from Umbria. Condemning the monothelite heresy, he was
arrested in Constantinople and starved to death. He was the last Pope of
Rome to be martyred. He is widely venerated in the East. Feast: 12 November
(In the East 14 April). *


St. Eugene I (+ 657), Roman. Famed for his mildness and kindness to the
poor, this saintly man resisted threats to his life from the Emperor in
Constantinople. Feast: 2 June.


St. Vitalian (+ 672), opposed monothelitism and appointed the first Greek
Archbishop of Canterbury, St Theodore. Feast: 27 January (In the East 23
July). *


St. Agatho (+ 681), Sicilian of Greek origin. Preceded by two popes who are
not saints, he was a kindly and generous man, who also helped call the Sixth
Oecumenical Council and helped end monotheletism. Feast: 10 January (20
February in the East). *


St. Leo II (+ 683), Sicilian, possibly of Greek descent. He confirmed the
condemnation of a predecessor, the heretical Pope Honorius I (+ 638), who
had fallen into the monothelite heresy. He loved the poor and was also much
concerned with church music. Feast: 3 July.


St. Benedict II (+ 685), Roman. He loved the poor and was humble-minded and
gentle. Feast: 7 May.


St. Sergius I (+ 701), born in Palermo, he was a Syrian. Able and energetic,
he did much for missionary work in England and northern Europe. He loved the
liturgy and church singing and introduced the feast of the Exaltation of the
Cross into the West. He was preceded by two popes who are not saints and
succeeded by four other non-saints, two Greeks and two Syrians. Feast: 8
September.


St. Gregory II (+ 731), the most outstanding Roman pope of the eighth
century An able leader, he condemned iconoclasm as a heresy and did much to
encourage missionary work, like that of St Boniface among the German tribes.
He restored churches and fostered the monastic life. Feast: 11 February.


St. Gregory III (+ 741), Syrian. He was acclaimed Pope by the crowds at his
predecessor's funeral. He vigorously opposed iconoclasm, built churches and
had them adorned with frescos, and also encouraged the monastic life and
fostered missionary work in northern Europe. Feast: 28 November.


St Zacharias (+ 752), a Greek and the last Orthodox saint in this see, he
opposed iconoclasm, adorned churches with frescos, and did much for
missionary work and peace all over western Europe. Feast: 15 March.


Readers will notice that information on many of the early popes is lacking.
Many of these are also traditionally held to be martyrs, but there is some
uncertainty about this. It should be added that many of the popes were
opposed by antipopes, often heretics. This became more and more the case in
the Middle Ages when the Orthodox period of the papacy is over and the
institution becomes more political and worldly than religious and spiritual.


The reader will no doubt be struck by the fact so many of the early popes
are revered as saints, indeed, the first fifty-three in continuous
succession. If we take the period up till St Zacharias inclusive, of 90
popes, 68 are revered as saints. Perhaps even more striking is the fact that
since St Zacharias, the last Orthodox Roman pope to be a saint, there have
been no fewer than 173 popes. Of these only seven are today considered to be
saints by the Vatican: one of these was Nicholas I, the notorious filioquist
who condemned St Photius of Constantinople, another was Leo IX, the pope
ultimately responsible for excommunicating Patriarch Michael of
Constantinople in 1054.


Thus with our thoughts on the holy Orthodox popes of Rome, let us pray with
one mind and one soul for the salvation of the once Orthodox lands of the
West and their salvation in this new millennium.


Holy Orthodox Popes of Rome, pray to God for us!
Logged
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2010, 06:51:07 PM »

Who was the last Patriarch of Rome?

edit: Yes, the last Bishop of Rome from the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. The last one who was listed in the dyptychs of the other local Churches.

Sixtus III was the last one to live to his death in the Church. Leo I succeeded him and maintained until 449.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 06:52:15 PM by deusveritasest » Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2010, 06:54:49 PM »

His teaching on Christ was acclaimed by
all the Orthodox at the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

LOL. Sure. You guys keep telling yourselves that. Maybe if you say it enough times it will come true.
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
stashko
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: ИСТОЧНИ ПРАВОСЛАВНИ СРБИН
Jurisdiction: Non Ecumenist Free Serbian Orthodox Church
Posts: 4,998


Wonderworking Sitka Icon


« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2010, 06:56:49 PM »

Here Here Fr.Ambrose I Join My Prayers With Your's ,Holy Orthodox Popes Pray to God For Us ,And That The Present Fallen Rome Returns Back to It's Orthodox Roots... Amen Amen
Logged

ГОСПОДЕ ГОСПОДЕ ,ПОГЛЕДАЈ СА НЕБА ,ДОЂИ И ПОСЕТИ ТВОЈ ВИНОГРАД ТВОЈА ДЕСНИЦА ПОСАДИЛА АМИН АМИН.
Irish Hermit
Kibernetski Kaludjer
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,991


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us


« Reply #18 on: May 27, 2010, 07:07:23 PM »

His teaching on Christ was acclaimed by
all the Orthodox at the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

LOL. Sure. You guys keep telling yourselves that. Maybe if you say it enough times it will come true.

Dear Chris,

I thought the Oriental Orthodox and Pope John Paul had signed an agreement that your Christologies are identical and that miaphysitism is the same as diaphysitism.  It was all simply a ghastly semantic mistake 1600 years ago.

Would that not validate the Popes of Rome in Oriental eyes?
Logged
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2010, 07:24:02 PM »

I thought the Oriental Orthodox and Pope John Paul had signed an agreement that your Christologies are identical and that miaphysitism is the same as diaphysitism.  It was all simply a ghastly semantic mistake 1600 years ago.

Would that not validate the Popes of Rome in Oriental eyes?

Regardless of what you are saying here, the claim that the Tome of Leo was acclaimed by "all the orthodox" is rather silly, unless you think that the Egyptian, Illyrian, and Palestinian bishops who all at first refused even to accept it at all were all heterodox (and the Egyptians of which never did accept it, while the Illyrians were eventually convinced that it was orthodox [I don't remember what happened with the Palestinians]). Bottom line is that all 13 (or 14 for those who do not recognize the deposition of Dioscorus) Egyptian bishops present did not accept the Tome of Leo at Chalcedon at all.

As to the supposed agreements, you are perhaps painting overly broad strokes. Yes, Coptic Orthodox Pope Shenouda III and Syriac Orthodox Patriarch Ignatius Zakka I Iwas both signed agreed statements with the Romans. I am not entirely familiar with their content. If they went so far as to say that Chalcedon was simply "a ghastly semantic mistake" or something of that sort, I would reject these agreed statements. I do not view any one or two bishops as infallible.

The Coptic Pope has been rather critical of the Romanists since then anyway. Christology is not our only issue with them. We have talked over with you Byzantines on the other issues that you have with the Romanists and for the most part have agreed with you on them. Pope Shenouda III wrote an essay attacking Purgatory. We have agreed that the filioque is heterodox.

So Christology aside there is still no recognition of the Romans.

But even if those issues weren't present, I wouldn't agree with the decisions of these bishops if they decided that the Romans were valid on the basis of the Chalcedonic schism just being a "mistake".
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2010, 07:34:51 PM »

A final point that I will make is that for most of us, the simple linguistic distinction between "one nature" and "two natures" is not of fundamental importance, especially given that these were philosophical constructs used to formulate the faith in a certain way. They did not convey the same meaning from all people in all circumstances, and thus the meaning must be discerned. For instance, obviously Eutyches meant something slightly different by "one nature" than St. Cyril did. Likewise, we generally believe that the use of "two natures" was slightly different from when the Theodoreans originally used it, than when it was used at Chalcedon, which is also understood as being slightly different than when it was used at Constantinople II. Most of us, even admittedly someone as conservatively Anti-Chalcedonian as myself, admit that the use of "two natures" at Constantinople II was essentially orthodox.
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
Shlomlokh
主哀れめよ!
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Bulgarian
Posts: 1,228



« Reply #21 on: May 27, 2010, 09:08:32 PM »

His teaching on Christ was acclaimed by
all the Orthodox at the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

LOL. Sure. You guys keep telling yourselves that. Maybe if you say it enough times it will come true.
Wow, what provoked such an attitude?  Huh In my opinion, there are probably more respectful ways of addressing people (especially an Orthodox priest). Wink

In Christ,
Andrew
« Last Edit: May 27, 2010, 09:10:29 PM by Shlomlokh » Logged

"I will pour out my prayer unto the Lord, and to Him will I proclaim my grief; for with evils my soul is filled, and my life unto hades hath drawn nigh, and like Jonah I will pray: From corruption raise me up, O God." -Ode VI, Irmos of the Supplicatory Canon to the Theotokos
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #22 on: May 27, 2010, 11:24:36 PM »

Wow, what provoked such an attitude?

Propaganda.
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
Shanghaiski
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 7,970


Holy Trinity Church of Gergeti, Georgia


« Reply #23 on: May 28, 2010, 02:38:31 PM »

Pope St. Zacharias is the last Pope to be recognized as a saint by the Orthodox.  Pope Sergius IV was the last before the Filioque was inserted at Rome.

Actually, Pope St. Leo IV's Live was written by St. Photios, and certainly he was venerated in the West since it as before the schism.

Pope Leo IX died in 1054 and did not authorize what followed, necessarily. Although he is problematic, he apparently did work miracles immediately after his death.
Logged

Quote from: GabrieltheCelt
If you spend long enough on this forum, you'll come away with all sorts of weird, untrue ideas of Orthodox Christianity.
Quote from: orthonorm
I would suggest most persons in general avoid any question beginning with why.
Deacon Lance
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Byzantine Catholic
Jurisdiction: Archeparchy of Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,891


Liturgy at Mt. St. Macrina Pilgrimage


« Reply #24 on: May 28, 2010, 05:56:40 PM »

Between St. Zachary and St. Leo IX are St. Paul I, St. Leo III, St. Pascal I, St. Leo IV, St. Nicholas I, and St. Adrian III. 
Logged

My cromulent posts embiggen this forum.
Irish Hermit
Kibernetski Kaludjer
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,991


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us


« Reply #25 on: May 28, 2010, 06:28:00 PM »

Wow, what provoked such an attitude?

Propaganda.

So when the Eastern Orthodox express their view, it is propaganda?    The website is the work of Fr Andrew Philips in the UK.

I am not sure how you can write "propaganda" so blithely.  I realise that you are kind of in an unenviable no-man's land with no Church family and looking for your future Church home.  So we imagine that your views are not fully determned as yet and what you call "propaganda" today may be seen as valid by you tomorrow.  God bless you in the journey.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2010, 06:29:19 PM by Irish Hermit » Logged
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #26 on: May 28, 2010, 06:48:41 PM »

So when the Eastern Orthodox express their view, it is propaganda?

No. When they express an objectively and obviously erroneous view for the sake of dishonestly making their side look good, that's propaganda. And like I said, unless the statement assumed that the Egyptian, Illyrian, and Palestinian bishops (all of whom were recorded as thouroughly rejecting the Tome of Leo or rejecting it at first, questioning it, then acceding to it without great enthusiasm [i.e. "acclaim"]) were heterodox, then it is simply incorrect to say that the Tome was "acclaimed by all the orthodox".

So we imagine that your views are not fully determned as yet

I wouldn't be so sure about that.

and what you call "propaganda" today may be seen as valid by you tomorrow.

That's great exaggeration. My view on this matter has been exactly the same for more than a year now.
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.14 seconds with 54 queries.