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Author Topic: Byzantine Empire & Orthodox Culture  (Read 2956 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: April 10, 2010, 07:19:29 AM »

The Byzantine Empire survived for roughly a millenium, which is a long time for a European empire and an achievement in and of itself. It developed a certain distinctive style of architecture and had some other cultural achievements, but for an empire with access to the great intellectual foundation built by the classical Greco-Roman tradition, it had relatively few innovations and did not greatly enhance the knowledge developed by its forefathers.  The Byzantines may have studied ancient texts, but in some respects they may have studied these texts as as they did the Bible - not looking to improve upon what they read but instead looking to absorb what they studied. When Constantinople fell in the 15th century, many Byzantine scholars fled to other parts of Europe and helped to inspire a Renaissance, yet the same scholars inside the Byzantine Empire seemed to store knowledge as opposed to inspiring intellectual progress.

Would you characterize the Byzantines as having been culturally and intellectually conservative, and has this conservative mindset carried forward into the culture and attitudes of Orthodox nations and peoples today? Additionally what role has this conservatism had with respect to the Orthodox style of religious worship?
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« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2010, 08:15:16 AM »

The Byzantine Empire survived for roughly a millenium, which is a long time for a European empire and an achievement in and of itself. It developed a certain distinctive style of architecture and had some other cultural achievements, but for an empire with access to the great intellectual foundation built by the classical Greco-Roman tradition, it had relatively few innovations and did not greatly enhance the knowledge developed by its forefathers.  The Byzantines may have studied ancient texts, but in some respects they may have studied these texts as as they did the Bible - not looking to improve upon what they read but instead looking to absorb what they studied. When Constantinople fell in the 15th century, many Byzantine scholars fled to other parts of Europe and helped to inspire a Renaissance, yet the same scholars inside the Byzantine Empire seemed to store knowledge as opposed to inspiring intellectual progress.

Would you characterize the Byzantines as having been culturally and intellectually conservative, and has this conservative mindset carried forward into the culture and attitudes of Orthodox nations and peoples today? Additionally what role has this conservatism had with respect to the Orthodox style of religious worship?

Are you equating conservative=mortibund?

The  reactionarinsm as far as society is concerned is not throughout its history, but the latter third.  Greek Fire, for instance, was the nuclear weapon of the day.  The empire was able to form a commonwealth with territories subject to it (e.g. the Balkans).  The empire only became mortibund after 1204, where the Empire became more reactionary, the imperial ideology more millitantly Hellenic, its hiearchy more Ultramontanist, and its claims more detached from reality.
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« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2010, 09:26:43 AM »

The Byzantine Empire survived for roughly a millenium, which is a long time for a European empire and an achievement in and of itself. It developed a certain distinctive style of architecture and had some other cultural achievements, but for an empire with access to the great intellectual foundation built by the classical Greco-Roman tradition, it had relatively few innovations and did not greatly enhance the knowledge developed by its forefathers.  The Byzantines may have studied ancient texts, but in some respects they may have studied these texts as as they did the Bible - not looking to improve upon what they read but instead looking to absorb what they studied. When Constantinople fell in the 15th century, many Byzantine scholars fled to other parts of Europe and helped to inspire a Renaissance, yet the same scholars inside the Byzantine Empire seemed to store knowledge as opposed to inspiring intellectual progress.

Would you characterize the Byzantines as having been culturally and intellectually conservative, and has this conservative mindset carried forward into the culture and attitudes of Orthodox nations and peoples today? Additionally what role has this conservatism had with respect to the Orthodox style of religious worship?

Are you equating conservative=mortibund?

The  reactionarinsm as far as society is concerned is not throughout its history, but the latter third.  Greek Fire, for instance, was the nuclear weapon of the day.  The empire was able to form a commonwealth with territories subject to it (e.g. the Balkans).  The empire only became mortibund after 1204, where the Empire became more reactionary, the imperial ideology more millitantly Hellenic, its hiearchy more Ultramontanist, and its claims more detached from reality.

History teaches us that one could substitute the description of the post 1204 period of the Empire with any number of other great empires and nations as they enter a gradual period of decline leading to collapse or reinvention. For example, in the modern era, with a few tweeks you could substitute British, Tsarist, Soviet etc.... (obviously Ultramontanist wouldn't apply, but there would be other themes that fit).
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2010, 09:30:19 AM »

The Byzantine Empire survived for roughly a millenium, which is a long time for a European empire and an achievement in and of itself. It developed a certain distinctive style of architecture and had some other cultural achievements, but for an empire with access to the great intellectual foundation built by the classical Greco-Roman tradition, it had relatively few innovations and did not greatly enhance the knowledge developed by its forefathers.  The Byzantines may have studied ancient texts, but in some respects they may have studied these texts as as they did the Bible - not looking to improve upon what they read but instead looking to absorb what they studied. When Constantinople fell in the 15th century, many Byzantine scholars fled to other parts of Europe and helped to inspire a Renaissance, yet the same scholars inside the Byzantine Empire seemed to store knowledge as opposed to inspiring intellectual progress.

Would you characterize the Byzantines as having been culturally and intellectually conservative, and has this conservative mindset carried forward into the culture and attitudes of Orthodox nations and peoples today? Additionally what role has this conservatism had with respect to the Orthodox style of religious worship?

I recently heard some modern scholars "can't remember who" on the subject and they stated that if the empire was given a little while longer. They would have come up with calculus and sparked there own Renaissance. Calculus was what was missing in becoming modern. I was also said that they were at the brink of the discovery just before the fall.
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« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2010, 12:39:08 PM »

The Byzantine Empire survived for roughly a millenium, which is a long time for a European empire and an achievement in and of itself. It developed a certain distinctive style of architecture and had some other cultural achievements, but for an empire with access to the great intellectual foundation built by the classical Greco-Roman tradition, it had relatively few innovations and did not greatly enhance the knowledge developed by its forefathers.  The Byzantines may have studied ancient texts, but in some respects they may have studied these texts as as they did the Bible - not looking to improve upon what they read but instead looking to absorb what they studied. When Constantinople fell in the 15th century, many Byzantine scholars fled to other parts of Europe and helped to inspire a Renaissance, yet the same scholars inside the Byzantine Empire seemed to store knowledge as opposed to inspiring intellectual progress.

Would you characterize the Byzantines as having been culturally and intellectually conservative, and has this conservative mindset carried forward into the culture and attitudes of Orthodox nations and peoples today? Additionally what role has this conservatism had with respect to the Orthodox style of religious worship?

I recently heard some modern scholars "can't remember who" on the subject and they stated that if the empire was given a little while longer. They would have come up with calculus and sparked there own Renaissance. Calculus was what was missing in becoming modern. I was also said that they were at the brink of the discovery just before the fall.

In real life, are you another Gus Portokalos? Don't take me wrong, next to Toula and Maria, I loved the man more than any other character in that marvelous movie.

BTW, I heard in another setting that if Basil II had not been successful, The resultant Orthodox Empire of Greater Bulgaria (all of Eastern Europe and Russia, in addition to Asia Minor, the Levant and Egypt) would have stopped the Roman advances to the East, rolled back the Muslim hordes and stopped the Turks cold.

Hey, why not?  laugh
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« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2010, 01:33:13 PM »

The Byzantine Empire survived for roughly a millenium, which is a long time for a European empire and an achievement in and of itself. It developed a certain distinctive style of architecture and had some other cultural achievements, but for an empire with access to the great intellectual foundation built by the classical Greco-Roman tradition, it had relatively few innovations and did not greatly enhance the knowledge developed by its forefathers.  The Byzantines may have studied ancient texts, but in some respects they may have studied these texts as as they did the Bible - not looking to improve upon what they read but instead looking to absorb what they studied. When Constantinople fell in the 15th century, many Byzantine scholars fled to other parts of Europe and helped to inspire a Renaissance, yet the same scholars inside the Byzantine Empire seemed to store knowledge as opposed to inspiring intellectual progress.

Would you characterize the Byzantines as having been culturally and intellectually conservative, and has this conservative mindset carried forward into the culture and attitudes of Orthodox nations and peoples today? Additionally what role has this conservatism had with respect to the Orthodox style of religious worship?

I recently heard some modern scholars "can't remember who" on the subject and they stated that if the empire was given a little while longer. They would have come up with calculus and sparked there own Renaissance. Calculus was what was missing in becoming modern. I was also said that they were at the brink of the discovery just before the fall.

In real life, are you another Gus Portokalos? Don't take me wrong, next to Toula and Maria, I loved the man more than any other character in that marvelous movie.

BTW, I heard in another setting that if Basil II had not been successful, The resultant Orthodox Empire of Greater Bulgaria (all of Eastern Europe and Russia, in addition to Asia Minor, the Levant and Egypt) would have stopped the Roman advances to the East, rolled back the Muslim hordes and stopped the Turks cold.

Hey, why not?  laugh

Sure, and if JEB Stuart had reinforced Lee earlier at Gettysburg, Pickett's Charge might have succeeded and if Eisenhower had failed in the planning for the first day of Normandy etc...etc.........It's pointless to speculate what might have been in history had events gone another way. Errors and mistakes in history should be studied to allow them not to be repeated - not for idle speculation.
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« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2010, 07:14:40 AM »

I love the eastern Empire because the first emperors were from Seville, or Spain. hehe
My fellow Sevillano from Seville Theodosius the first made the Empire Christian.
Spanish emperors were the best ever.
The Roman Empire at its peak was ruled by the Spanish Emperor Trajan from Seville too.
Ah Seville thy city illuminates my world, id est your world.

Hadrian, Trajan, Theodosius I, Theodosius the II all great emperors.

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