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Author Topic: Tradition of saying "Christ is Risen" in multiple languages  (Read 3078 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: April 06, 2010, 11:12:48 AM »

Here in the US (especially in OCA parishes it seems) there is a tradition of saying "Christ is Risen" in a plethora of languages to express the universality of Christ's Resurrection. I remember when I attended an OCA parish (and all my friends who currently attend OCA parishes) have stories of sheets being handed out with "Christ is Risen" in a dozen or more languages. My one friend even goes so far as learning it in a new language every year, just so he can challenge his priest! lol  laugh

In the UOC parish I grew up in and currently attend, we only say "Christ is Risen" in English, Ukrainian, and Greek. (And the Greek confuses people! lol)

So I was wondering if this tradition is an American-ism to Orthodoxy (up there with pews, organs, and BBQ's) or if this is something that is done throughout the world?  Huh
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2010, 12:13:31 PM »

Here in the US (especially in OCA parishes it seems) there is a tradition of saying "Christ is Risen" in a plethora of languages to express the universality of Christ's Resurrection. I remember when I attended an OCA parish (and all my friends who currently attend OCA parishes) have stories of sheets being handed out with "Christ is Risen" in a dozen or more languages. My one friend even goes so far as learning it in a new language every year, just so he can challenge his priest! lol  laugh

In the UOC parish I grew up in and currently attend, we only say "Christ is Risen" in English, Ukrainian, and Greek. (And the Greek confuses people! lol)

So I was wondering if this tradition is an American-ism to Orthodoxy (up there with pews, organs, and BBQ's) or if this is something that is done throughout the world?  Huh

Well, I do not know of any church in any other country where "Texan" is also used. In a church without pews and organ/piano, but with communal meals (not mere coffee hours) after each Liturgy, the priest was heard to use it one year. It went:

Christ is up!
Yup!

 Smiley Cheesy Grin angel laugh Kiss
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« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2010, 12:25:56 PM »

Well, I do not know of any church in any other country where "Texan" is also used. In a church without pews and organ/piano, but with communal meals (not mere coffee hours) after each Liturgy, the priest was heard to use it one year. It went:

Christ is up!
Yup!

 Smiley Cheesy Grin angel laugh Kiss

And then there's the Ebonics translation:

Word up!
Word!
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« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2010, 01:01:35 PM »

In my (GOA) parish, we say the Paschal greeting and its response in English, Greek, Slavonic, Arabic, and Romanian (these being the principal languages used among our parishioners); in the Easter bulletin, they also included a sheet which gives the greeting and response in many other languages.
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« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2010, 01:13:42 PM »

When I was in Romania, it was about 95% "Hristos a inviat!" and maybe 5% "Christos anesti!" No other languages.
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« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2010, 01:16:10 PM »

Christ is risen!

This may be a function of North America being the only place where the various groups are in one location in great numbers and not killing each other.
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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2010, 02:52:21 PM »

Here in the US (especially in OCA parishes it seems) there is a tradition of saying "Christ is Risen" in a plethora of languages to express the universality of Christ's Resurrection. I remember when I attended an OCA parish (and all my friends who currently attend OCA parishes) have stories of sheets being handed out with "Christ is Risen" in a dozen or more languages. My one friend even goes so far as learning it in a new language every year, just so he can challenge his priest! lol  laugh

In the UOC parish I grew up in and currently attend, we only say "Christ is Risen" in English, Ukrainian, and Greek. (And the Greek confuses people! lol)

So I was wondering if this tradition is an American-ism to Orthodoxy (up there with pews, organs, and BBQ's) or if this is something that is done throughout the world?  Huh

Well, I do not know of any church in any other country where "Texan" is also used. In a church without pews and organ/piano, but with communal meals (not mere coffee hours) after each Liturgy, the priest was heard to use it one year. It went:

Christ is up!
Yup!

 Smiley Cheesy Grin angel laugh Kiss
I heard it as this:

"Christ done rose!"
"Yyyyyyup!"
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« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2010, 02:54:43 PM »

In Pizzaese:

The Chrust has risen!
The Chrust has risen indeed!
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« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2010, 04:37:07 PM »

Christ is risen!

This may be a function of North America being the only place where the various groups are in one location in great numbers and not killing each other.

Indeed He is risen!

Yeah, that's sort of what I figured. I was hoping maybe Michael or OzGeorge or some of our other non-American members could enlighten me as to the practices in their respective countries.
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« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2010, 04:37:28 PM »

In Pizzaese:

The Chrust has risen!
The Chrust has risen indeed!

*rimshot*
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« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2010, 07:58:07 PM »

It has been told to me from different persons that in several churches of the Jerusalem Patriarchate, it is not uncommon for there to be diverse languages, as well as at the Phanar, Athens, Thessaloniki, Damascus, Moscow, and St. Petersburg.   This is a shorter form of proclaiming the universality of the resurrection, which we already do anyway by reading the gospel in a multiplicity of languages either at midnight or at the Agape Vespers.   I was told by a priest from Poland that it was common to sing the troparion at the beginning of Matins in a multiplicity of languages at the beginning and then to proclaim Christ is risen at the very end of Liturgy in a variety of languages for the same purpose, but predominantly "Christos Voskrese" in the main body.   If he said the name of the church/city I do not recall it. 
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« Reply #11 on: April 07, 2010, 07:40:18 AM »


Well, I do not know of any church in any other country where "Texan" is also used. In a church without pews and organ/piano, but with communal meals (not mere coffee hours) after each Liturgy, the priest was heard to use it one year. It went:

Christ is up!
Yup!

 Smiley Cheesy Grin angel laugh Kiss
I heard it as this:

"Christ done rose!"
"Yyyyyyup!"

When I said to my 2 year old son, "Christ is Risen!" his response was:
Thank you very much

Here in the Netherlands, we say it in Dutch, English, Russian, Greek, French, Romanian, German,....
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« Reply #12 on: April 07, 2010, 10:05:45 AM »

Welkom op het forum, Mildert.

That's all the Dutch I know. Embarrassed
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« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2010, 10:14:29 AM »

Here in the US (especially in OCA parishes it seems) there is a tradition of saying "Christ is Risen" in a plethora of languages to express the universality of Christ's Resurrection. I remember when I attended an OCA parish (and all my friends who currently attend OCA parishes) have stories of sheets being handed out with "Christ is Risen" in a dozen or more languages. My one friend even goes so far as learning it in a new language every year, just so he can challenge his priest! lol  laugh

In the UOC parish I grew up in and currently attend, we only say "Christ is Risen" in English, Ukrainian, and Greek. (And the Greek confuses people! lol)

So I was wondering if this tradition is an American-ism to Orthodoxy (up there with pews, organs, and BBQ's) or if this is something that is done throughout the world?  Huh

In the Philippines, Catholics have the tradition of saying Alleluia, Alleluia after saying Christ is Risen!

W: Si Kristo Nabanhaw!
R: Alleluya, Alleluya
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« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2010, 10:26:59 AM »

Welkom op het forum, Mildert.

That's all the Dutch I know. Embarrassed

Thanks or should I say "Dank u wel!"
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« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2010, 01:24:31 PM »

During the Liturgies I've attended this year the greetings were said in Church Slavonic only and the troparion sung in Church Slavonic (mostly), Greek and Latin. On the other hand there were more languages of paschal Gospel.
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« Reply #16 on: April 07, 2010, 01:27:37 PM »


Our Gospel Reading was in three languages.

This year it was in Ukrainian, English and Church Slavonic.

The greetings are in Ukrainian and English.

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« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2010, 01:40:49 PM »


Our Gospel Reading was in three languages.

This year it was in Ukrainian, English and Church Slavonic.

The greetings are in Ukrainian and English.



Our Gospel readings were in English, as well as in Belorussian, Bulgarian, French, German, Greek, Italian, Macedonian, Romanian, Russian, Slavonic, Spanish, Turkish and Ukrainian. It worked quite well as only the English covered all 17 verses, while it took us only two additional rounds to cover the remaining 13 languages.
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« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2010, 01:57:57 PM »

Wow!  Impressive!

So, 14 languages all together.  Any reason for that particular number and mix of languages?
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« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2010, 02:05:59 PM »

Wow!  Impressive!

So, 14 languages all together.  Any reason for that particular number and mix of languages?

Usually the answer is, "that's what we could get with the people we have."

We had a modest number this year: 8 (English, NT Greek, Latin, Spanish, Arabic, German, Italian, and American Sign).  If our Greek chanter had shown up, I would have given him the text I found of the Gospel translated into Homeric Greek (what a trip!).  With a little brushing up (or a complete re-education), I may be able to do French next year (it's only been, oh, 15+ years since I studied it).
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« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2010, 02:24:59 PM »

Wow!  Impressive!

So, 14 languages all together.  Any reason for that particular number and mix of languages?

Usually the answer is, "that's what we could get with the people we have."

We had a modest number this year: 8 (English, NT Greek, Latin, Spanish, Arabic, German, Italian, and American Sign).  If our Greek chanter had shown up, I would have given him the text I found of the Gospel translated into Homeric Greek (what a trip!).  With a little brushing up (or a complete re-education), I may be able to do French next year (it's only been, oh, 15+ years since I studied it).

Christos anesti!

Was that the whole Gospel or just this part in Epic verse?
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« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2010, 02:41:12 PM »

Christos anesti!

Was that the whole Gospel or just this part in Epic verse?

Just the Agape reading.

I'll include it below, with the first words of the section in NT Greek in parentheses beforehand.  I'm a wee bit skeptical, but I haven't had a chance to check the veracity of the claim (that it is true Homeric-age Greek).

(Ούσης οψίας τή ημέρα εκείνη…)
Εύτε δή ηέλιος φαέθων επί έσπερον ήλθε καί σκιόωντο αγυιαί επί χθόνα πουλυβοτείρη, ήματι εν πρώτω, ότε τύμβου άλτο Σαωτήρ, Κληϊσταί δε έσαν θυρίδες πυκινώς αραρείαι, βλήντο δέ πάντες οχήες εϋσταθέος μεγάροιο, ένθα μαθηταί ομού τε αολλέες ηγερέθοντο, μυρόμενοι θανάτω επ’ αεικέϊ Χριστού άνακτος, ήλυθε δή τότε Χριστός άναξ θεοειδέϊ μορφή, έστη δ’ εν μεσάτω αναφανδόν καί φάτο μύθον.  Ειρήνη υμίν φίλοι, ησυχίη τ’ ερατεινή.  Ως ειπών επέδειξεν εήν πλευρήν ηδέ χείρας.  Γήθησαν δέ μαθηταί, επεί ίδον Ευρυμέδοντα.

(Είπεν ούν αυτοίς ο Ιησούς πάλιν…)
Τούς δ’ αύτις προσέειπεν Ιησούς ουρανοφοίτης.  Ειρήνη υμίν φίλοι, ησυχίη τ’ ερατεινή.  Ως εμέ πέμψε Πατήρ, ός υπέρτατα δώματα ναίει, Ώδ’ εγώ υμέας εις χθόνα πέμπω ευρυόδειαν.  Ως άρα φωνήσας μύσταις έμπνευσ’ αγορεύων.  Πνεύμα δέχνυσθ’ άγιον, φαεσέμβροτον, υψιθόωκον.  Ών μέν ατασθαλίας θνητών αφέητ’ επί γαίαν, τοίσιν ή που αφίενται ες ουρανόν αστερόεντα.  Ών δ’ άρ’ επεσβολίας υπερφιάλων κρατέητε, τοίσιν αλυκτοπέδης κείναι σθεναρής κρατέονται.

(Θωμάς δέ, είς εκ τών δώδεκα…)
Θωμάς δ’ ώ επίκλησις άπασι Δίδυμος ακούειν, ουχ άμα τοίς άλλοις μύσταις πρίν ομώροφος έσκεν, Ιησούς ότ’ έβη είσω μελάθροιο εταίρων.  Ίαχον ούν άλλοι τούτω ερίηρες εταίροι.  Είδομεν οφθαλμοίσιν Ιησούν παγκρατέοντα.  Τούς δ’ απαμειβόμενος Θωμάς προσέφησεν ατειρής.  Ίχνια ήν μή ίδω μετά χείρεσιν ηλοτορήτης, δάτυλον εμβάλλω τε εκείνου ένδοθι χειρός, χείρα τ’ εμήν είσω πλευρής οί ρεία βαλοίμην, ούποτε υμετέροισι λόγοις κεφαλή κατανεύσω.
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« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2010, 02:47:30 PM »

We read the original NT Greek, modern Greek, homeric Greek (sung), Arabic, Slavonic, Coptic, French, Albanian, Latin and English.
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« Reply #23 on: April 07, 2010, 03:21:20 PM »

Christos anesti!

Was that the whole Gospel or just this part in Epic verse?

Just the Agape reading.

I'll include it below, with the first words of the section in NT Greek in parentheses beforehand.  I'm a wee bit skeptical, but I haven't had a chance to check the veracity of the claim (that it is true Homeric-age Greek).

(Ούσης οψίας τή ημέρα εκείνη…)
Εύτε δή ηέλιος φαέθων επί έσπερον ήλθε καί σκιόωντο αγυιαί επί χθόνα πουλυβοτείρη, ήματι εν πρώτω, ότε τύμβου άλτο Σαωτήρ, Κληϊσταί δε έσαν θυρίδες πυκινώς αραρείαι, βλήντο δέ πάντες οχήες εϋσταθέος μεγάροιο, ένθα μαθηταί ομού τε αολλέες ηγερέθοντο, μυρόμενοι θανάτω επ’ αεικέϊ Χριστού άνακτος, ήλυθε δή τότε Χριστός άναξ θεοειδέϊ μορφή, έστη δ’ εν μεσάτω αναφανδόν καί φάτο μύθον.  Ειρήνη υμίν φίλοι, ησυχίη τ’ ερατεινή.  Ως ειπών επέδειξεν εήν πλευρήν ηδέ χείρας.  Γήθησαν δέ μαθηταί, επεί ίδον Ευρυμέδοντα.

(Είπεν ούν αυτοίς ο Ιησούς πάλιν…)
Τούς δ’ αύτις προσέειπεν Ιησούς ουρανοφοίτης.  Ειρήνη υμίν φίλοι, ησυχίη τ’ ερατεινή.  Ως εμέ πέμψε Πατήρ, ός υπέρτατα δώματα ναίει, Ώδ’ εγώ υμέας εις χθόνα πέμπω ευρυόδειαν.  Ως άρα φωνήσας μύσταις έμπνευσ’ αγορεύων.  Πνεύμα δέχνυσθ’ άγιον, φαεσέμβροτον, υψιθόωκον.  Ών μέν ατασθαλίας θνητών αφέητ’ επί γαίαν, τοίσιν ή που αφίενται ες ουρανόν αστερόεντα.  Ών δ’ άρ’ επεσβολίας υπερφιάλων κρατέητε, τοίσιν αλυκτοπέδης κείναι σθεναρής κρατέονται.

(Θωμάς δέ, είς εκ τών δώδεκα…)
Θωμάς δ’ ώ επίκλησις άπασι Δίδυμος ακούειν, ουχ άμα τοίς άλλοις μύσταις πρίν ομώροφος έσκεν, Ιησούς ότ’ έβη είσω μελάθροιο εταίρων.  Ίαχον ούν άλλοι τούτω ερίηρες εταίροι.  Είδομεν οφθαλμοίσιν Ιησούν παγκρατέοντα.  Τούς δ’ απαμειβόμενος Θωμάς προσέφησεν ατειρής.  Ίχνια ήν μή ίδω μετά χείρεσιν ηλοτορήτης, δάτυλον εμβάλλω τε εκείνου ένδοθι χειρός, χείρα τ’ εμήν είσω πλευρής οί ρεία βαλοίμην, ούποτε υμετέροισι λόγοις κεφαλή κατανεύσω.
The vocabulary and the morphology are definitely Homeresque, but, at first look, this seems more like an adaptation than a very close "translation", or perhaps, since we talk about the same language, transposition.
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« Reply #24 on: April 07, 2010, 04:46:46 PM »

Wow!  Impressive!

So, 14 languages all together.  Any reason for that particular number and mix of languages?

The reason given by Father George is spot on--We had our priest who read the entire 17 verses in English, of course. As for the rest, we had 12 people, one of whom read in two languages. 
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« Reply #25 on: April 07, 2010, 11:45:59 PM »

What I have been looking for I have not been able to find. In a book from the Church of Greece they have the Gospel in English phonetically written in Greek. Now that is trippy to read.
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« Reply #26 on: April 07, 2010, 11:56:37 PM »

What I have been looking for I have not been able to find. In a book from the Church of Greece they have the Gospel in English phonetically written in Greek. Now that is trippy to read.

I've seen it, also.  They had the phonetics for many different languages (French, Italian, etc.).  They're in the back of one of the books (I can't remember which, but I think it was an Ieratikon).
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« Reply #27 on: April 08, 2010, 12:26:51 AM »

We read the original NT Greek, modern Greek, homeric Greek (sung), Arabic, Slavonic, Coptic, French, Albanian, Latin and English.
Wow, Latin as well?
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« Reply #28 on: April 08, 2010, 05:05:35 AM »

What I have been looking for I have not been able to find. In a book from the Church of Greece they have the Gospel in English phonetically written in Greek. Now that is trippy to read.

I've read that in the 19th century there were many books written in Turkish with Greek letters.
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« Reply #29 on: April 08, 2010, 10:02:02 AM »

We read the original NT Greek, modern Greek, homeric Greek (sung), Arabic, Slavonic, Coptic, French, Albanian, Latin and English.
Wow, Latin as well?

Why not?  I've read the Latin gospel for 15 years, in 3 different Churches during that span.  Yes, there still are people who study Latin in school Wink
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« Reply #30 on: April 08, 2010, 05:13:47 PM »

We read the original NT Greek, modern Greek, homeric Greek (sung), Arabic, Slavonic, Coptic, French, Albanian, Latin and English.
Wow, Latin as well?

Why not?  I've read the Latin gospel for 15 years, in 3 different Churches during that span.  Yes, there still are people who study Latin in school Wink

At Princeton University, there is always one person from the Classics Dept. who gives an entire address in Latin during the Commencement ceremonies. The problem is 95% of the audience doesn't have a clue as to what they are saying!  Cheesy

Going back to the original topic, it appears that it varies from parish to parish as to how many languages "Christ is risen!" and the Gospel is proclaimed.
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« Reply #31 on: April 10, 2010, 11:05:31 AM »

At Princeton University, there is always one person from the Classics Dept. who gives an entire address in Latin during the Commencement ceremonies. The problem is 95% of the audience doesn't have a clue as to what they are saying!  Cheesy

I still don't know what I signed up for when I got matriculated at university. The only word I understood was "matriculorum" which didn't help much. I could be a high ranking Free Mason for all I know.
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« Reply #32 on: April 11, 2010, 11:49:04 AM »

Christos anesti!

Was that the whole Gospel or just this part in Epic verse?

Just the Agape reading.

I'll include it below, with the first words of the section in NT Greek in parentheses beforehand.  I'm a wee bit skeptical, but I haven't had a chance to check the veracity of the claim (that it is true Homeric-age Greek).

(Ούσης οψίας τή ημέρα εκείνη…)
Εύτε δή ηέλιος φαέθων επί έσπερον ήλθε καί σκιόωντο αγυιαί επί χθόνα πουλυβοτείρη, ήματι εν πρώτω, ότε τύμβου άλτο Σαωτήρ, Κληϊσταί δε έσαν θυρίδες πυκινώς αραρείαι, βλήντο δέ πάντες οχήες εϋσταθέος μεγάροιο, ένθα μαθηταί ομού τε αολλέες ηγερέθοντο, μυρόμενοι θανάτω επ’ αεικέϊ Χριστού άνακτος, ήλυθε δή τότε Χριστός άναξ θεοειδέϊ μορφή, έστη δ’ εν μεσάτω αναφανδόν καί φάτο μύθον.  Ειρήνη υμίν φίλοι, ησυχίη τ’ ερατεινή.  Ως ειπών επέδειξεν εήν πλευρήν ηδέ χείρας.  Γήθησαν δέ μαθηταί, επεί ίδον Ευρυμέδοντα.

(Είπεν ούν αυτοίς ο Ιησούς πάλιν…)
Τούς δ’ αύτις προσέειπεν Ιησούς ουρανοφοίτης.  Ειρήνη υμίν φίλοι, ησυχίη τ’ ερατεινή.  Ως εμέ πέμψε Πατήρ, ός υπέρτατα δώματα ναίει, Ώδ’ εγώ υμέας εις χθόνα πέμπω ευρυόδειαν.  Ως άρα φωνήσας μύσταις έμπνευσ’ αγορεύων.  Πνεύμα δέχνυσθ’ άγιον, φαεσέμβροτον, υψιθόωκον.  Ών μέν ατασθαλίας θνητών αφέητ’ επί γαίαν, τοίσιν ή που αφίενται ες ουρανόν αστερόεντα.  Ών δ’ άρ’ επεσβολίας υπερφιάλων κρατέητε, τοίσιν αλυκτοπέδης κείναι σθεναρής κρατέονται.

(Θωμάς δέ, είς εκ τών δώδεκα…)
Θωμάς δ’ ώ επίκλησις άπασι Δίδυμος ακούειν, ουχ άμα τοίς άλλοις μύσταις πρίν ομώροφος έσκεν, Ιησούς ότ’ έβη είσω μελάθροιο εταίρων.  Ίαχον ούν άλλοι τούτω ερίηρες εταίροι.  Είδομεν οφθαλμοίσιν Ιησούν παγκρατέοντα.  Τούς δ’ απαμειβόμενος Θωμάς προσέφησεν ατειρής.  Ίχνια ήν μή ίδω μετά χείρεσιν ηλοτορήτης, δάτυλον εμβάλλω τε εκείνου ένδοθι χειρός, χείρα τ’ εμήν είσω πλευρής οί ρεία βαλοίμην, ούποτε υμετέροισι λόγοις κεφαλή κατανεύσω.
Fr. George,
I apologize for being 4 days late (just saw the post); this is the famous translation of the Gospel made by St. Nicodemus the Hagiorite:

(Wisdom! Upright! Let us hear the Holy Gospel)
Ἰθυγε∫νεῖς. Σοφί∫η. ‖ Εὐ∫αγγελί∫οιο κλύ∫ωμεν.
(Peace be unto all).
Εἰρή∫νη χαρί∫εσσ’ ‖ ἐπ’ ἀ∫πείρονα ∫ δῆμον ἐ∫σεῖται.
(The Reading is from the Holy Gospel according to John)
Ἐκ δ’ ἄρ’ Ἰ∫ωάν∫νοιο ‖ τόδ’ ∫ ἔστι ∫ βροντογό∫νοιο.
(Let us attend)
Ἄλλ’ ἄγετ’ ∫ ἀτρεμέ∫σι ‖ χρη∫σμοὺς λεύ∫σωμεν ὀ∫πωπαῖς.
(Then the same day at evening, being the first day of the week...)
Εὖτε δὴ ∫ ἠέλι∫ος ‖ φαέ∫θων ἐπὶ ∫ ἕσπερον ∫ ἦλθε
καὶ σκιό∫ωντο ἀ∫γυιαὶ ‖ ἐ∫πὶ χθονὶ ∫ πουλυβο∫τείρῃ,
ἥματι ∫ ἐν πρώ∫τῳ, ‖ ὅτε ∫ τύμβου ∫ ἆλτο Σα∫ωτήρ,
κλῃι∫σταὶ δὲ ἔ∫σαν ‖ θυρί∫δες πυκι∫νῶς ἀρα∫ρεῖαι,
βλῆντο δὲ ∫ πάντες ὀ∫χῆες ‖ ἐ∫υσταθέ∫ος μεγά∫ροιο,
ἔνθα Μα∫θηταὶ ὁ∫μοῦ τε ‖ ἀ∫ολλέες ∫ ἠγερέ∫θοντο
μυρόμε∫νοι θανά∫τῳ ‖ ἐπ’ ἀ∫εικέι ∫ Χριστοῦ Ἄ∫νακτος
καὶ χόλον ∫ ἀφραί∫νοντα ‖ Ἰ∫ουδαί∫ων τρομέ∫οντες,
ἤλυθε ∫ δὴ τότε ∫ Χριστὸς ‖ Ἄ∫ναξ θεο∫ειδέι ∫ μορφῇ,
ἔστη ∫ δ’ ἐν μεσά∫τῳ ‖ ἀνα∫φανδὸν ∫ καὶ φάτο ∫ μῦθον·
Εἰρή∫νη ὑ∫μῖν ‖ φίλη, ∫ ἡσυχί∫η τ’ ἐρα∫τεινή.
Ὡς εἰ∫πὼν ἐπέ∫δειξεν ‖ ἑ∫ὴν πλευ∫ρὴν ἠδὲ ∫ χεῖρας.
Γήθη∫σαν δὲ Μα∫θηταὶ ‖ ἐ∫πεὶ ἴδον ∫ Εὐρυμέ∫δοντα.

Τοὺς δ’ αὖ∫τις προσέ∫ειπεν ‖ Ἰ∫ησοῦς ∫ οὐρανο∫φοίτης·
Εἰρή∫νη ὑ∫μῖν ‖ φίλη, ∫ ἡσυχί∫η τ’ ἐρα∫τεινή.
Ὡς ἐμὲ ∫ πέμψε Πα∫τὴρ ‖ ὅς ὑ∫πέρτατα ∫ δώματα ∫ ναίει,
ῳδ’ ἐγὼ ∫ ὑμέας ∫ ἐς χθόνα ∫ πέμπω ∫ ‖ εὐρυό∫δειαν.
Ὡς ἄρα ∫ φωνή∫σας ‖ Μύ∫σταις ἔμ∫πνευσ’ ἀγο∫ρεύων·
Πνεῦμα δέχ∫νυσθ’ Ἅγι∫ον, ‖ φαε∫σίμβροτον, ∫ ὑψιθό∫ωκον·
Ὧν μὲν ἀ∫τασθαλί∫ας θνη∫τῶν ‖ ἀφέ∫ητ’ ἐπὶ ∫ γαῖαν,
τοῖσι νύ∫που ἀφί∫ενται ‖ ἐς ∫ οὐρανὸν ∫ ἀστερό∫εντα·
ὧν δ’ ἄρ’ ἐ∫πεσβολί∫ας ‖ ὑ∫ππερφιά∫λων κρατέ∫ητε,
τοῖσιν ἁ∫λυκτοπέ∫δῃς ‖ κεῖ∫ναι σθενα∫ρῇς κρατέ∫ονται.

Θωμᾶς ∫ δ’ ῳ ἐπί∫κλησις ‖ ἅ∫πασι Δί∫δυμος ἀ∫κούειν
οὐχ ἅμα ∫ τοῖς ἄλ∫λοις Μύ∫σταις ‖ πρὶν ὁ∫μώροφος ∫ ἔσκε
Ἰη∫σοῦς ὅτ’ ἔ∫βη εἴ∫σω ‖ μελά∫θροιο ἑ∫ταίρων.
Ἴαχον ∫ οὖν ἄλ∫λοι τού∫τῳ ‖ ἐρί∫ηρες ἑ∫ταῖροι·
Εἴδομεν ∫ ὀφθαλ∫μοῖσιν ‖ Ἰ∫ησοῦν ∫ παγκρατέ∫οντα.
Τοὺς δ’ ἀπα∫μειβόμε∫νος ‖ Θω∫μᾶς προσέ∫φησεν ἀ∫τειρής·
Ἴχνια ∫ ἤν μὴ ἴ∫δω ‖ μετὰ ∫ χείρεσιν ∫ ἡλατο∫ρήτῃς,
δάκτυλον ∫ ἐμβάλ∫λω τε ‖ ἐ∫κείνου ∫ ἔνδοθι ∫ χειρός,
χεῖρα τ’ ἐ∫μὴν εἴ∫σω ‖ πλευ∫ρῆς οἷ ∫ ρεῖα βα∫λοίμην,
οὔποτε ∫ ὑμετέ∫ροισι ‖ λό∫γοις κεφα∫λῇ κατα∫νεύσω.

(∫=dactylic meter, ‖=caesura)

You can listen to it here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9RiRNPjflI (begins at 0:41")
« Last Edit: April 11, 2010, 11:54:05 AM by Apostolos » Logged

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qG5JWZlpfBA
St. John Papadopoulos "The Koukouzelis"
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