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Author Topic: The Role of Microorganisms in Christianity  (Read 810 times) Average Rating: 0
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JLatimer
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« on: March 29, 2010, 03:19:04 AM »

Is any one else fascinated by the role yeast play in Orthodoxy? In Orthodox worship, we use fermented wine and leavened bread (unlike Roman Catholics, who use unleavened bread, and many Protestants, who use unfermented grape juice); both of these gifts are the product not just of human art and labor, but also of the working of millions of microorganisms.

Obviously, the Christian interest in leaven goes all the way back to Old Testament days, and in the New Testament, our Lord himself used leaven as a metaphor for the Kingdom of Heaven. I've heard some various explanations of what leavening represents and why it's important that we use leavened bread. I just like that the bread and wine start out as living things.

Similar topic is that beeswax candles represent the work of many bees (as well as human candlemakers) and come ultimately from so many different flowers.

In the end, it seems every kingdom of life, plant, animal, fungus, and humanity are all represented in the gifts we bring to church.
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1 Samuel 25:22 (KJV)
So and more also do God unto the enemies of David, if I leave of all that pertain to him by the morning light any that pisseth against the wall.
yochanan
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O majestic aurora, how seeming did He fashion you!


« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2010, 03:30:58 AM »

Is any one else fascinated by the role yeast play in Orthodoxy? In Orthodox worship, we use fermented wine and leavened bread (unlike Roman Catholics, who use unleavened bread, and many Protestants, who use unfermented grape juice); both of these gifts are the product not just of human art and labor, but also of the working of millions of microorganisms.

Obviously, the Christian interest in leaven goes all the way back to Old Testament days, and in the New Testament, our Lord himself used leaven as a metaphor for the Kingdom of Heaven. I've heard some various explanations of what leavening represents and why it's important that we use leavened bread. I just like that the bread and wine start out as living things.

Similar topic is that beeswax candles represent the work of many bees (as well as human candlemakers) and come ultimately from so many different flowers.

In the end, it seems every kingdom of life, plant, animal, fungus, and humanity are all represented in the gifts we bring to church.

Fascinating thought Smiley

I'd guess we could also include metal in that list. And we could also add several other non-living minerals such as the minerals used to make the paint in icons.

Also, several human mental gifts are put in church -- carpentry, music, leadership/management, culinary arts, computer technology (listing of laity), electricity and much, much more!

Indeed, not only microorganisms but almost everything in the world could be related to the church building and the Church (the people).

That's why we should take care of Mother Nature because she holds several precious things for us.
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"It seemed good to the Holy Spirit and to us..." (Acts 15: 28)
ytterbiumanalyst
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« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2010, 12:57:10 PM »

Thank you for bringing this up. What a wonderful thing to ponder as we prepare to take the Eucharist at the most blessed Resurrection of our Lord.
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"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
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