OrthodoxChristianity.net
November 26, 2014, 12:37:37 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Does anyone have an Inkling?  (Read 524 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
FormerReformer
Convertodox of the convertodox
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: I'll take (e) for "all of the above"
Posts: 2,441



WWW
« on: March 21, 2010, 02:27:53 AM »

I was originally going to title this "Yet Another CS Lewis Thread", but decided to broaden my horizons.

Anyone who has read my posts should by this point realize I have a love for Lewis and Tolkien, which upon reviewing some of the past threads I see more than a few share.  Rather than resurrect older threads which only broadly touch on this topic, I thought I'd start a new, Inklings inclusive one.

So, first question, who is your favorite Inkling?  For my part, CS Lewis has long been an unofficial "patron saint", a man who has deeply influenced my search for Orthodoxy, and as regards saints themselves a great influence.  How could I possibly deny the place of a saint within the Christian life when my deepest sense of communion has been with a man who died nearly forty years before my birth (and I do realize that Lewis is not a saint, but he certainly helped in this regard in overcoming certain deeply instilled prejudice I had in this area)?  However, Charles Williams has recently become a top contender, for anyone who has yet to read Descent Into Hell it comes highly recommended.  As regards the before-mentioned prejudice, this book destroyed the last remnants.  Of course, Tolkien is beloved as well, not only for his trilogy, but On Fairy-Stories and Father Giles of Ham can be cited as influences on my own small literary aspirations.

Second, as regards Lewis, what is your favorite book?  It is a very close call for me, Till We Have Faces is excellent, the Narnia books provide a formative experience for me (I will never forget attending a play of The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe in London when I was three, and to this day reading over Aslan's resurrection gives me goosebumps [more so the Gospel records, Pascha is always an experience]),The Great Divorce is a book I cannot go long without referencing, and The Pilgrim's Regress which I discovered at an early age along with Bunyan's original was my first introduction to philosophy.  However, in the final analysis, I would have to say that The Abolition of Man and it's related fictional book That Hideous Strenght stand out as Lewis' crowning achievements (although in regards to the latter I am somewhat biased in that it references Arthurian legend, another interest of mine).

Third, Williams.  Any favorites here, or are his connections with the Fellowship of the Rosy Cross too much for Orthodox tastes?  His books do seem to be more closely linked with occultism, enough so to give even myself pause in one or two, The Greater Trumps being the main offender.

Fourth, Tolkien.  I won't ask for opinions regarding favorites, as I am assuming the trilogy will rank highest.  Although I might be surprised by The Silmarillion apologists (which is indeed a great read).

Finally, has anyone read/ can give me an opinion on Roger Lancelyn Green?  I have been unable to hunt down his writings, though I do believe I read his King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table and his retelling of Greek myths as a child.  I'm particularly interested in thoughts on The Land of the Lord High Tiger.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2010, 02:28:22 AM by FormerReformer » Logged

"Funny," said Lancelot, "how the people who can't pray say that prayers are not answered, however much the people who can pray say they are."  TH White

Oh, no: I've succumbed to Hyperdoxy!
Justin Kissel
Formerly Asteriktos
Protospatharios
****************
Offline Offline

Posts: 30,205


that is not the teaching of...


« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2010, 06:00:31 AM »

I knew of the group, but the only books I've read have been by Lewis and Tolkien, though I'm sort of split as to a favorite. As you guessed, my favorite by Tolkien is the LOTR trilogy (though I haven't read it in years... for shame!)  And for Lewis, probably my two favorites are Voyage of the Dawn Treader and Screwtape Letters.
Logged
Tags:
Pages: 1   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.038 seconds with 28 queries.