Author Topic: A Completely Different View On Prayer  (Read 670 times)

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Offline GabrieltheCelt

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A Completely Different View On Prayer
« on: March 04, 2010, 05:13:26 PM »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1mFRUGDY8Ao&feature=channel

I don't know too much about Kabbalah (the mystical side of Judaism), but this short video on prayer is rather eye-opening.  Thoughts?
"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying

Offline genesisone

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Re: A Completely Different View On Prayer
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2010, 05:59:47 PM »
Yes, very interesting. Not an Orthodox context, however, but I have been learning that prayer should change me not God.

Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: A Completely Different View On Prayer
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2010, 06:23:29 PM »
Not an Orthodox context,
I apologize for scandalizing any y'all.

... but I have been learning that prayer should change me not God.
This is the part I found thought provoking.  The narrator explains that, rather than implore God to change the situation, we might do better to implore God to grant us patience and acceptance of our problems.  I can appreciate the efficacy of such a paradigm shift, but it's easier said than done.
"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying

Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: A Completely Different View On Prayer
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2010, 07:07:53 PM »
"The Kabbalahists tell us that the 'upper force' doesn't listen to our words, but only responds to what's in our hearts." 

 I found this particular sentence really fascinating.  A couple of things stood out for me regarding this sentence.  One is that, we all know that words don't always convey what's in our hearts.  We use them to mask our true thoughts or feelings or emotions.  For example, when we tell others we're doing great, but really we feel crummy.  The mentioning of our hearts also piqued my interest because it's a key component in Orthodox therapy;  "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.", and Psalm 50:6 "Behold, thou desirest truth in the inward parts: and in the hidden part (the heart) thou shalt make me to know wisdom."

 Do you suppose that there is some truth to this understanding of prayer?  That God typically responds to our hearts' condition rather than our words, which may not accurately convey our hearts?
"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying

Offline Orthodox11

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Re: A Completely Different View On Prayer
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2010, 07:53:20 PM »
Although I am quite weary of so called Kabbalah movements, the concept of prayer presented in this view is not miles away from my own view. The aim of prayer is union with Christ. In God there is no change, neither shadow cast by turning. It therefore seems entirely logical that prayer should change me, and conform my will to that of God, and not be some kind of attempt to change the will of God.

Do you suppose that there is some truth to this understanding of prayer?  That God typically responds to our hearts' condition rather than our words, which may not accurately convey our hearts?

Isn't this what the Church teaches? The words we speak in prayer must be accompanied by a corresponding inclination in the heart.

However, one should not downplay the importance of the words we use when praying. Our Lord teaching us the "Our Father" was a response to "Teach us how to pray." The words of the prayers of the Church teach us how we should approach God, and again help us to change our hearts and minds to conform to His will.