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Author Topic: List of Key ACOE Fathers/Theologians  (Read 867 times) Average Rating: 0
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Rafa999
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« on: March 01, 2010, 10:30:33 PM »

CONTEXT NOTE:  The following was originally contributed to List of Key Orthodox Fathers/Theologians.  Seeing how the Fathers listed here are venerated by the Assyrian Church of the East but not by the EO communion, and seeing that Alveus Lacuna requested a list ONLY of Fathers of the Eastern Orthodox tradition, I can't see how the following names fit the requested list.  However, I see the potential for worthwhile discussion coming out of the following list of ACOE Fathers, so I gave this discussion its own thread.

- PtA



Theodore of Mopsuestia. Mar Ibas of Edessa.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 10:39:23 PM by PeterTheAleut » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2010, 10:30:33 PM »

Outside of Orthodoxy, most of these are recognized as "doctors".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_the_Church#Eastern_Orthodoxy

Quote
The Eastern Orthodox church honours many of the pre-schism saints as well, but the application of the term Doctor or Father of the Church is somewhat more flexible than in the West, and it is misleading to look for lists of officially recognized Doctors. An Eastern Orthodox understanding of such pillars of the Church include saints such as Photios I of Constantinople, Gregory Palamas, Nicodemus the Hagiorite and possibly even more recent saints such as Nectarius Kefalas. An exception to this flexibility is the grouping of Basil the Great, Gregory of Nazianzus and John Chrysostom, universal teachers or Doctors who are collectively known as the Three Hierarchs and represent the Christianization of the Hellenic tradition and education.

Here is a list of the pre-schism list of "doctors of the Roman Catholic Church", which wikipedia lists as also being venerated in the Orthodox church. From the East, St. John Chrysostom, St. Basil, St. Gregory Nazianzus, St. Athanasius, St. Cyril of Jerusalem, St. John of Damascus, and St. Cyril of Alexandria and St. Ephraim.

Latin doctors include St Gregory the Dialogist, St. Leo the Great, St. Ambrose and St. Jerome, along with St. Isidore, St. Peter Chrysologist, St. Hilary of Poitiers, and St. Bede.

St. Isaac the Syrian / Isaac of Nineveh definitely warrants a mention. I see James of Serug in this list of those honoured by the Chaldean Catholics along with Isaac the Syrian. The Chaldeans were originally East Syrian (sometimes labeled Nestorian).

Quote
The Chaldean Catholic Church has recognized Polycarp, Eustathius of Antioch, Meletius, Alexander of Jerusalem, Athanasius, Basil, Cyril of Alexandria, Gregory Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa, John Chrysostom, Fravitta of Constantinople, Ephrem the Syrian, Jacob of Nisibis, James of Serug, Isaac of Armenia, Isaac of Nineve, and Maruthas.

Of the three "pillars of Orthodoxy" -  Saints Photios of Constantinople, Gregory Palamas, & Mark of Ephesus - Photios is pre-schism and honoured as a saint in several of the sui iuris Catholic churches.

St. John Cliamcus and the ladder of Divine ascent should be noted.

If you can hunt down the first three volumes of Johannes Quasten's Patrology, you will have a broad overview of the Nicene and pre-Nicene patristic tradition. The pre-Nicene is excellent - apostolic constitutions and Didache, St. Justin, St. Iraneus, St. Ignatius of Antioch especially, along with St. Cyprian of Carthage.

He also covers such problematic figures as Origen and Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian (both pre-apostacy and post apostacy). Hippolyte of Rome's contributions are invaluable, especially descriptions of (Greek) liturgical tradition in Rome (baptism, eucharist/chrismation, consecration of bishop) in the second century - oddly enough his writings were very popular in Alexandria and among the Orientals. There is a fourth volume which he did not author, which covers the Latin Golden age, but I suspect only St. Ambrose will be of interest to you.

I find it unfair that Mar Ibas, Mar Theodore of Mopsuestia, and Diodorus of Tarsus, Aphrahat the Persian Sage and others are not included in the Chaldean list of  doctors when the work of Mar Marutha, Ephrem, Isaac of Nineveh, Jacob of Nibisis, etc. were from the same tradition. Like saying St. Clement is a heretic but St. Ignatius is not (or vice versa), makes no sense.
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2010, 10:30:34 PM »

Super Apostolic, it is important for you to know that one Church's "Church Father" is another's Arch-heretic. Roman Catholics call Photius an impious person, but the OC love him. Likewise both the RCC and OC consider many of the Antiochan pillars "heretics" but they are considered impeccable Saints in their tradition. For example, I consider Dioscorus a heretic, but the Syriac Orthodox Church does not, and they consider the Assyrian Saint Theodore of Mopsuestia a heretic.
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