Author Topic: Christ is Born!  (Read 2235 times)

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Offline Bogoliubtsy

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Christ is Born!
« on: January 07, 2004, 01:13:42 AM »
Christ is Born!

Glorify Him!


-Ñ-ÿ-í-ó-P-í-¬ -É-û-ö-É-ò-óC-»!

-í-¢-É-Æ-ÿ-ó-ò!


For those of us on the old reckoning, Merry Christmas!




« Last Edit: January 07, 2004, 09:34:25 AM by Bogoliubtsy »
"When you give food to the poor, they call you a saint. When you ask why the poor have no food, they call you a communist". - Archbishop Hélder Pessoa Câmara

Offline Νεκτάριος

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2004, 01:21:22 AM »
How is the above Russian transliterated?

thanks...

Offline SamB

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2004, 06:02:19 AM »
I believe it comes out as "Xristos rajdaetya, Slavyte".

Nektarios, both the Roman and Slavic alphabets are derived from Greek, so in your case it shouldn't be difficult to learn the alphabet quickly.  I'm afraid, however, that Russian is not read phonetically as written as much as is Greek, particularly with vowels.  If Russian is anything similiar to Bulgarian, there will be much in the area of rules on the subject.

Merry Christmas to the board's old calendrists.

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« Last Edit: January 07, 2004, 06:03:21 AM by SamB »

Offline SamB

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2004, 06:06:25 AM »
To our Russian speakers, does Russian grammar feature pairs of 'voiced/voiceless' consonants as Bulgarian does?  This results in some consonants not being pronounced as they are written.

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Offline The young fogey

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2004, 09:06:48 AM »
-Æ-ü-¦-+ -+-Ç-¦-+-¦-+-â-Ä-ê-+-+ -ü-¦-¦-+-¦-+-Å, -½-Ñ-Ç-+-ü-é-+-ü -Ç-¦-¦-¦-¦-¦-é-ü-Å! -í-+-¦-¦-+-é-¦ (-ò-¦-+)!-+

IIRC that greeting is more Ukrainian than Russian and the Ukrainian-speakers say '-í-+-¦-¦-+-+ -Ö-+-¦-+!' for 'Glorify Him!'

By voiced or unvoiced consonants do you mean the letters without or with the 'soft sign' (-î) after them, Samer? If so, yes, Russian has them.
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Offline Bogoliubtsy

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2004, 09:34:56 AM »
Ooops...left out a "C" .
"When you give food to the poor, they call you a saint. When you ask why the poor have no food, they call you a communist". - Archbishop Hélder Pessoa Câmara

Offline SamB

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2004, 10:08:51 AM »
Serge, not quite (B.T.W., it's interesting to note that in Bulgarian, the 'hard sign' is a special vowel).

I am referring to a particular categorisation of some consonants that factors into something known as 'consonantal assimilation'.

In Bulgarian, this categorisation is used for the purpose of placing rules to assist with the pronunciation of words spelled etymologically.  Each consonant within the voiced group has a corresponding consonant that sounds similiar to it within the voiceless group (eg. -æ and -Æ’).  Under certain conditions, one member of a pair of consonants would be pronounced as the other member of that pair.

If I have not confused you with the foregoing explanation, would something similiar exist in Russian?

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« Last Edit: January 07, 2004, 10:11:40 AM by SamB »

Offline SamB

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2004, 12:25:44 PM »
One more thing I'd like to mention: the difference between the voiced and voiceless consonants is that the former require the use of the vocal chords to be pronounced.

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Offline The young fogey

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #8 on: January 07, 2004, 06:19:08 PM »
Samer,

OK, now I understand. I think the answer is yes. For example, -à -+-¦-¦ (bread) isn't really 'khlyeb' as it would be phonetically but 'khlyep' (the b turns into a p sound), and -¦ (v) before a word starting with vowel turns into an f.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2004, 11:49:17 AM by Serge »
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Offline Νεκτάριος

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #9 on: January 07, 2004, 07:08:23 PM »
I did OK guessing from Greek how to pronounce it, Samer...it is just that I have NEVER seen anything like that third letter in the second word so I had no clue what to think!

Offline Keble

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Re:Christ is Born!
« Reply #10 on: January 07, 2004, 11:00:53 PM »
A more conventionalized transliteration might be

Khristos razhdayetsya! Slaviteh!

where the 'i' is taken as 'ee'.

Nothing is quite as annoying to the Anglo-Russophile than trying to sing Church Slavonic with a mixed group of converts, Ukrainians, Moscovites, and assorted second gen types.