Author Topic: Latin and Greek terms for "salvation"  (Read 5178 times)

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Offline Heorhij

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Latin and Greek terms for "salvation"
« on: February 24, 2010, 08:59:24 AM »
Dear knowledgeable folks,

I was wondering: does the Greek term for salvation, "sotitia," have the "medicinal" connotations in it, like the Latin term "salvatus" (apparently, "salve" is a medicine)?

Thanks!
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Offline Melodist

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Re: Latin and Greek terms for "salvation"
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2010, 01:27:19 PM »
There are two words that are translated as "save".

The greek word "sozo" literally means to save, deliver or protect, heal, preserve, make well, or make whole.

The greek word "soteria" means rescue or safety, deliver, heal, or save and has it's root in the word "sozo".
And FWIW, these are our Fathers too, you know.

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Offline Heorhij

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Re: Latin and Greek terms for "salvation"
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2010, 02:02:07 PM »
There are two words that are translated as "save".

The greek word "sozo" literally means to save, deliver or protect, heal, preserve, make well, or make whole.

The greek word "soteria" means rescue or safety, deliver, heal, or save and has it's root in the word "sozo".


Thank you. So, there IS this "medicinal" connotation" in "sotiria" ("soteria").
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Offline pensateomnia

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Re: Latin and Greek terms for "salvation"
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2010, 06:52:03 PM »
Thank you. So, there IS this "medicinal" connotation" in "sotiria" ("soteria").

Yes, although honestly, this is more of a Christian or Late Antique idea than it is a classical one. In the authors of the classical period, in both Greek and Latin, the word is pretty much about preservation from harm and deliverance from afflictions/harm/injury. Corporeality becomes an important category in late antique thought in both Christianity and pagan high society. So, then, you see some uses that are medicinal.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2010, 07:24:30 PM by pensateomnia »
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Offline Heorhij

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Re: Latin and Greek terms for "salvation"
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2010, 07:48:15 PM »
Thank you. So, there IS this "medicinal" connotation" in "sotiria" ("soteria").

Yes, although honestly, this is more of a Christian or Late Antique idea than it is a classical one. In the authors of the classical period, in both Greek and Latin, the word is pretty much about preservation from harm and deliverance from afflictions/harm/injury. Corporeality becomes an important category in late antique thought in both Christianity and pagan high society. So, then, you see some uses that are medicinal.

Thank you, that's very interesting!
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Offline Christianus

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Re: Latin and Greek terms for "salvation"
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2010, 04:41:51 AM »
Dear knowledgeable folks,

I was wondering: does the Greek term for salvation, "sotitia," have the "medicinal" connotations in it, like the Latin term "salvatus" (apparently, "salve" is a medicine)?

Thanks!
Salve means hi (singular) Salvete hi plural.
Salus Salutis means Salvation, but in Vulgar Latin it came to mean health (spanish salud), and Salvatio Salvationis came to mean Salvation (so Salvation is actually a Latin word in English).
  to save in late latin is salvare (to be saved salvari continuous, perfect is salvatus sum) the original was Salvus Fieri ( to become saved) and Salvum Facere (to make saved) Salvum me fac Domine (save me Lord).
so the words to Save, Saviour (Lt. salvator), Salvation all come from Latin.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010, 04:44:34 AM by Christianus »