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Author Topic: St. Gregory Petrov? (Any Russians?)  (Read 2637 times) Average Rating: 0
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yochanan
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« on: March 16, 2010, 12:51:03 AM »

Guys, have you read the Akathist of Thanksgiving? It was written by a Hieromartyr, Fr. Gregory Petrov.

It is a very beautiful akathist and I think its enough fact to merit his public veneration. Is the Russian Church aiming toward his canonization?

Here's a link to the beautiful piece: http://www.orthodox.net/akathists/akathist-thanksgiving.html
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« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2010, 04:14:11 AM »

It seems that this wonderful akathist was not written by Fr Gregory Petrov, but by a Metropolitan Tryphon:

Quote
The Akathist of Thanksgiving, ‘Glory to God for All Things’, was long attributed to Hieromartyr Gregory Petrov (+ 194?). The attribution has now been authoritatively made to Metropolitan Tryphon (Turkestanov) (+ 1934) and the akathist is one of the most popular texts of contemporary Orthodox piety in Russia.


Link: http://www.orthodoxengland.org.uk/akathist.htm

According to my resources, Metropolitan Tryphon has not yet been glorified as one of the New Martyrs and Confessors of Russia, but he is under consideration.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2010, 04:16:10 AM by LBK » Logged
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2010, 04:34:30 AM »

Here's a short(ish) life of Met. Tryphon:

The Akathist, Glory to God for all things, was written in the post-Revolutionary years by Metropolitan Tryphon (in the world, Boris Petrovich Turkestanov). He was born on 29 November 1861 in Moscow. His father, Prince Peter Nikolaievich Turkestanov (1830-1891) was the direct descendant of an ancient princely family from Georgia. His great-grandfather, Prince Boris Pankratevich Turkestanishvili, in memory of whom Metropolitan Tryphon was named, moved to Russia at the time of Peter the Great. The mother of the future cleric was Varvara Alexandrovna (born Princess Naryshkina and niece of the Decembrist Mikhail Mikhailovich Naryshkin).

When, in infancy, her son had a serious disease and the doctors had lost any hope, she would go to the church of Martyr Tryphon in Moscow to pray for his recovery, promising that, if he were cured, she would dedicate him to God, and that, if he were deemed worthy of the monastic order, he should be given the name Tryphon. The infant recovered, and soon, Varvara Alexandrovna made a pilgrimage to Optina Pustin to see the celebrated Elder Amvrosy who was known throughout all Russia. In meeting them, the Elder addressed the crowd saying, ‘make way – the archpriest is coming’. The people made way but were surprised to see not an archpriest but a woman with a child.

In 1887, Boris obtained his parents’ blessing to enter Optina Pustin as a novice under the instruction of Elder Amvrosy who blessed him to enter monasticism. In 1891, Boris received the monastic tonsure with the name Tryphon – thus fulfilling the vow given by his mother. Soon after, Father Tryphon was ordained Deacon and then priest. Elder Amvrosy blessed him to study in the Moscow Theological Academy. During this period of study, Hieromonk Tryphon chose to serve in a transit prison. In 1895, Father Tryphon graduated from the Theological Academy with a PhD in Theology, defending his thesis, ‘Ancient Christian Elders and the Elders of Optina’. He knew Greek, Latin, French, German, and English.

From 1895 to 1901, Father Tryphon was inspector of the Moscow Theological College and Rector of first Viphanskoy and then Moscow theological seminaries. On 18 July 1901, he was ordained Bishop of Dmitrov, vicar of the Moscow Eparchy, a post he held for almost fifteen years. Bishop Tryphon officiated frequently at the Divine Liturgy and was greatly loved by the citizens of Moscow. He preached a great deal and was involved in much Church work yet without abandoning his own researches. For his rare gift for words, the faithful called him ‘the Muscovite Chrysostom’. Vladyka was spiritually close to many ascetics of the Russian Church such as Elder Varnava of Gephsimania and Elder Zakhari of Holy Trinity St Sergius Lavra, and to the Optina elders Anatoly and Varnuphy (whom he ordained Archimandrite). After the start of the First World War, Bishop Tryphon saw active service in the army on the Yulyn front where he suffered shell-shock. He had to return to Moscow, his health shattered. In 1916, Bishop Tryphon retired to the New Jerusalem Resurrection Monastery outside Moscow. He again visited the front but returned to the same monastery in 1917.

From 1918, Bishop Tryphon lived in Moscow and did not take part in the administrative affairs of the Church. A constant flow of visitors came to him for spiritual and practical advice. The faithful already recognized him as a great archpriest, remarkable preacher, and ascetic, spirit-bearing elder. His advice and opinions were frequently decisive not only for the destinies of his numerous spiritual children but also for those who had to take decisions bound up with the destiny of the Russian Orthodox Church after the Revolution. The Patriarch, St Tikhon, loved Vladyka; he frequently concelebrated with him and, in 1923, raised him to the dignity of Archbishop. They were two great spiritual pillars who upheld the Holy Russian Church in those cruel and sorrowful times in Russia.

After the repose of St Tikhon in 1925, the role played by Archbishop Tryphon increased. Though being formally retired, he was one of the main spiritual guides of Russian Orthodoxy. In 1931, on the thirtieth anniversary of his elevation to the episcopate, Archbishop Tryphon was created Metropolitan. During the 1920s and 30s, Vladyka’s word was law for those who kept the true faith and spiritual wisdom amid the horrors of life in Russia at that time. People believed that by his lips, God Himself spoke. The artist, Pavel Korin, who painted Vladyka’s portrait from life, recalled that the majority of the portraits of spiritual persons he painted for his monumental canvas, ‘Disappearing Russia’ (Tretyakov Gallery) he was only able to paint thanks to Vladyka: those whom the artist had invited to his studio agreed to pose only after they learned of the blessing of the all-revered Metropolitan.

Shortly before his falling asleep in the Lord, Metropolitan Tryphon wrote his astonishing Akathist which became his spiritual testament. ‘Thanks be to God for all things!’ – in these words, the sum total of the spiritual experience of the Russian Orthodox Church in the times of the most cruel persecution which ever existed in the history of the Church of Christ. In 1924, the Metropolitan of Petrograd, Veniamin (Kazansky), who had been falsely charged with misappropriation of Church valuables, used these same words at the end of his speech in his trial. He was then sentenced to be shot. Christ Himself says, ‘be of good cheer; I have overcome the world’ (John 16:33). That is why, however hard and sorrowful the events of history, the power of God always triumphs.

The Resurrection was only possible after Golgotha. Similarly, the defeat of millions dying for their faith and the truth was turned into victory, being the way to eternal life, joyful and never-ending. Of this sings the inspired great son of Russia, Metropolitan Tryphon, thanking God ‘for all Thy good things both manifest and hid’; that is, having multiplied the talents entrusted to us, we will enter into the eternal joy of our Lord: Alleluia! Metropolitan Tryphon entered into his rest on 14 June 1934 and was buried in Nemetsokoye cemetery in Moscow. His grave is the object of veneration for countless Orthodox Russians.
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yochanan
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2010, 06:07:51 AM »

It seems that this wonderful akathist was not written by Fr Gregory Petrov, but by a Metropolitan Tryphon:

Quote
The Akathist of Thanksgiving, ‘Glory to God for All Things’, was long attributed to Hieromartyr Gregory Petrov (+ 194?). The attribution has now been authoritatively made to Metropolitan Tryphon (Turkestanov) (+ 1934) and the akathist is one of the most popular texts of contemporary Orthodox piety in Russia.


Link: http://www.orthodoxengland.org.uk/akathist.htm

According to my resources, Metropolitan Tryphon has not yet been glorified as one of the New Martyrs and Confessors of Russia, but he is under consideration.

Yeah, I just knew that after posting this. Tsk2x.. How come he isn't 'sainted' yet? Aren't all martyrs considered saints?
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« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2010, 01:17:51 PM »

Yes. Martyrs, Venerables, Blessed and so on make up Saints but, as LBK Metropolitan Tryphon hasn't been officially glorified.
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PeterTheAleut
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« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2010, 02:12:43 PM »

Here's a short(ish) life of Met. Tryphon:

***

Can this be found online?  If so, could you please post a link to this essay?
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« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2010, 05:06:07 PM »

Here's a short(ish) life of Met. Tryphon:

***

Can this be found online?  If so, could you please post a link to this essay?

Tle life I posted is from a Russian document translated by a friend of mine, who has the document.
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« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2010, 05:51:54 PM »

Here's a short(ish) life of Met. Tryphon:

***

Can this be found online?  If so, could you please post a link to this essay?

Tle life I posted is from a Russian document translated by a friend of mine, who has the document.
Fair enough. Wink
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yochanan
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O majestic aurora, how seeming did He fashion you!


« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2010, 10:47:46 AM »

Here's a short(ish) life of Met. Tryphon:

The Akathist, Glory to God for all things, was written in the post-Revolutionary years by Metropolitan Tryphon (in the world, Boris Petrovich Turkestanov). He was born on 29 November 1861 in Moscow. His father, Prince Peter Nikolaievich Turkestanov (1830-1891) was the direct descendant of an ancient princely family from Georgia. His great-grandfather, Prince Boris Pankratevich Turkestanishvili, in memory of whom Metropolitan Tryphon was named, moved to Russia at the time of Peter the Great. The mother of the future cleric was Varvara Alexandrovna (born Princess Naryshkina and niece of the Decembrist Mikhail Mikhailovich Naryshkin).

When, in infancy, her son had a serious disease and the doctors had lost any hope, she would go to the church of Martyr Tryphon in Moscow to pray for his recovery, promising that, if he were cured, she would dedicate him to God, and that, if he were deemed worthy of the monastic order, he should be given the name Tryphon. The infant recovered, and soon, Varvara Alexandrovna made a pilgrimage to Optina Pustin to see the celebrated Elder Amvrosy who was known throughout all Russia. In meeting them, the Elder addressed the crowd saying, ‘make way – the archpriest is coming’. The people made way but were surprised to see not an archpriest but a woman with a child.

In 1887, Boris obtained his parents’ blessing to enter Optina Pustin as a novice under the instruction of Elder Amvrosy who blessed him to enter monasticism. In 1891, Boris received the monastic tonsure with the name Tryphon – thus fulfilling the vow given by his mother. Soon after, Father Tryphon was ordained Deacon and then priest. Elder Amvrosy blessed him to study in the Moscow Theological Academy. During this period of study, Hieromonk Tryphon chose to serve in a transit prison. In 1895, Father Tryphon graduated from the Theological Academy with a PhD in Theology, defending his thesis, ‘Ancient Christian Elders and the Elders of Optina’. He knew Greek, Latin, French, German, and English.

From 1895 to 1901, Father Tryphon was inspector of the Moscow Theological College and Rector of first Viphanskoy and then Moscow theological seminaries. On 18 July 1901, he was ordained Bishop of Dmitrov, vicar of the Moscow Eparchy, a post he held for almost fifteen years. Bishop Tryphon officiated frequently at the Divine Liturgy and was greatly loved by the citizens of Moscow. He preached a great deal and was involved in much Church work yet without abandoning his own researches. For his rare gift for words, the faithful called him ‘the Muscovite Chrysostom’. Vladyka was spiritually close to many ascetics of the Russian Church such as Elder Varnava of Gephsimania and Elder Zakhari of Holy Trinity St Sergius Lavra, and to the Optina elders Anatoly and Varnuphy (whom he ordained Archimandrite). After the start of the First World War, Bishop Tryphon saw active service in the army on the Yulyn front where he suffered shell-shock. He had to return to Moscow, his health shattered. In 1916, Bishop Tryphon retired to the New Jerusalem Resurrection Monastery outside Moscow. He again visited the front but returned to the same monastery in 1917.

From 1918, Bishop Tryphon lived in Moscow and did not take part in the administrative affairs of the Church. A constant flow of visitors came to him for spiritual and practical advice. The faithful already recognized him as a great archpriest, remarkable preacher, and ascetic, spirit-bearing elder. His advice and opinions were frequently decisive not only for the destinies of his numerous spiritual children but also for those who had to take decisions bound up with the destiny of the Russian Orthodox Church after the Revolution. The Patriarch, St Tikhon, loved Vladyka; he frequently concelebrated with him and, in 1923, raised him to the dignity of Archbishop. They were two great spiritual pillars who upheld the Holy Russian Church in those cruel and sorrowful times in Russia.

After the repose of St Tikhon in 1925, the role played by Archbishop Tryphon increased. Though being formally retired, he was one of the main spiritual guides of Russian Orthodoxy. In 1931, on the thirtieth anniversary of his elevation to the episcopate, Archbishop Tryphon was created Metropolitan. During the 1920s and 30s, Vladyka’s word was law for those who kept the true faith and spiritual wisdom amid the horrors of life in Russia at that time. People believed that by his lips, God Himself spoke. The artist, Pavel Korin, who painted Vladyka’s portrait from life, recalled that the majority of the portraits of spiritual persons he painted for his monumental canvas, ‘Disappearing Russia’ (Tretyakov Gallery) he was only able to paint thanks to Vladyka: those whom the artist had invited to his studio agreed to pose only after they learned of the blessing of the all-revered Metropolitan.

Shortly before his falling asleep in the Lord, Metropolitan Tryphon wrote his astonishing Akathist which became his spiritual testament. ‘Thanks be to God for all things!’ – in these words, the sum total of the spiritual experience of the Russian Orthodox Church in the times of the most cruel persecution which ever existed in the history of the Church of Christ. In 1924, the Metropolitan of Petrograd, Veniamin (Kazansky), who had been falsely charged with misappropriation of Church valuables, used these same words at the end of his speech in his trial. He was then sentenced to be shot. Christ Himself says, ‘be of good cheer; I have overcome the world’ (John 16:33). That is why, however hard and sorrowful the events of history, the power of God always triumphs.

The Resurrection was only possible after Golgotha. Similarly, the defeat of millions dying for their faith and the truth was turned into victory, being the way to eternal life, joyful and never-ending. Of this sings the inspired great son of Russia, Metropolitan Tryphon, thanking God ‘for all Thy good things both manifest and hid’; that is, having multiplied the talents entrusted to us, we will enter into the eternal joy of our Lord: Alleluia! Metropolitan Tryphon entered into his rest on 14 June 1934 and was buried in Nemetsokoye cemetery in Moscow. His grave is the object of veneration for countless Orthodox Russians.


Met. Tryphon and Fr. Petrov should be canonized soon. Let's pray for that.  angel
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