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Author Topic: Monasticism - Catholicism and Orthodoxy  (Read 12836 times) Average Rating: 0
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ignatius
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« Reply #180 on: January 26, 2010, 12:49:10 PM »



Ignatius, you put me to shame. Only a catechumen and you are already much further head than I on the journey (both before and after my conversion from Catholicism to Orthodoxy).  I say that without any false humility.  I have baited you in the past and ask your forgiveness. Godspeed.

It's really not 'me'... I honestly think what helps 'me' pray everyday is my family. Some nights I honestly don't feel like praying but my daughter encourages me and other nights I encourage her. It's very nice to pray with family. I really like it when our whole family are involved, including Mom.

There is something about Orthodox Prayers which comes across very nonjudgmental that I find healthy for my daughter too. Looking at the Lord as 'on our side' and seeing sin as 'something other' is good at making my daughter not feel guilty at age seven. That is very important I think to building a canon or rule for them that they are not going to reject in later years.
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« Reply #181 on: January 26, 2010, 01:18:17 PM »

Dear Brother,
What you have posted above does not sound like Ignatius at all. While I definitely don't aprove of his schismatic actions, his posters, for years now, appear to be very genuine. He sounds like a man who is truely struggling and does not always know quite where he belongs. The situation in which he finds himself is a very difficult one and I don't envy him. I truely believe that he is trying his best to serve the Lord in the best way he knows how. It may be the wrong decision, but I do believe he is genuine about it. Rather than verbally attacking him, why not show him some love and pray for him. If you had been kinder to him, perhaps that example would have been the very thing that would have kept him in the Ark of Salvation. Just some things to think about.

No, No, No... my actions are nobodies fault except my own and those of my Priests, seriously. Saturday at Confession was kinda like the straw that broke the camels back. Far more Orthodox here slamming sincere Catholics trying to work out their salvation in fear and trembling has served more to drawing me to defense them but I honestly can't defend the Catholic Church in America, especially in my neck fo the woods. It is absolutely anti-Catholic Catechism, anti-moral code, pro-license.

That said we really should get this thread back on target.

What does 'you' Church encourage you to do as a spiritual/ascetic discipline? I've honestly never saw a Catholic praying the rosary at my parish, except during the RCIA session on the Rosary.
I am sorry that you have had such bad experience. Lucky for all of us, we know that no matter what our experience, the Lord loves and wants to divnize us.

As for my Parish, we are encouraged to fast and pray. The Rosary is a very important part of our parish life and it is prayed everday before daily mass while people are in line for confession. In fact, my parish offers confession twice every weekday, and three times on Saturday. For every single session of confession, there is a line and you have to be sure to be there early so that you get confession before mass since there are so many confessors. On Sundays we pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, and I can't even count all of the people who have made the liturgy of the ours part of their spiritual lives. We have Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament twenty four hours a day. During the Advent season, we have a novena leading up to Christmas with Mass, Confession, and Benediction. During the weeks leading up to Easter we have the Stations of the Cross every Friday with confession, Mass, and Benediction. The priests never give silly penances like "Love the Lord". Instead we are asked to make a Holy Hour with the Blessed Sacrament or pray the Rosary, the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, etc. The adult education courses at my parish are unmatched, and our youth ministry is moving towards a more and more traditional empahsis of the faith. Its a beautiful place and the parishes in my little suburb just north of Albuquerque are the same way. Writting this out just gives me a real peace, and I feel so genuinely greatful that the Lord has given me such a wonderful parish.
I feel you have been robbed in a sense by the parishes you have attended. I agree that in many places in the United States Catholicism is in a great crisis, not very different from the Arian Crisis. This time it is the modernist crisis and because of this, many have not experienced the deep fruits of the Catholic faith. That being said, I have a great parish and I will remain in communion with Sts. John of the Cross, Teresa of Avila, John Viani, Thomas Aquinas, Therse the Little Flower, Francis of Asisi, Dominic, Padre Pio, Claire, Catherine of Siena, and the countless others in the Holy Cloud of Witnesses. I cannot deny their sanctity and I don't believe such sanctity would be possible if they were worshiping bread and not the living Lord.
That all being said, I will always keep you in my prayers and I wish you the best in your journey to server our common Lord and Savior.
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ignatius
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« Reply #182 on: January 26, 2010, 02:39:17 PM »

I am sorry that you have had such bad experience. Lucky for all of us, we know that no matter what our experience, the Lord loves and wants to divnize us.

As for my Parish, we are encouraged to fast and pray. The Rosary is a very important part of our parish life and it is prayed everday before daily mass while people are in line for confession. In fact, my parish offers confession twice every weekday, and three times on Saturday. For every single session of confession, there is a line and you have to be sure to be there early so that you get confession before mass since there are so many confessors. On Sundays we pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, and I can't even count all of the people who have made the liturgy of the ours part of their spiritual lives. We have Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament twenty four hours a day. During the Advent season, we have a novena leading up to Christmas with Mass, Confession, and Benediction. During the weeks leading up to Easter we have the Stations of the Cross every Friday with confession, Mass, and Benediction. The priests never give silly penances like "Love the Lord". Instead we are asked to make a Holy Hour with the Blessed Sacrament or pray the Rosary, the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, etc. The adult education courses at my parish are unmatched, and our youth ministry is moving towards a more and more traditional empahsis of the faith. Its a beautiful place and the parishes in my little suburb just north of Albuquerque are the same way. Writting this out just gives me a real peace, and I feel so genuinely greatful that the Lord has given me such a wonderful parish.
I feel you have been robbed in a sense by the parishes you have attended. I agree that in many places in the United States Catholicism is in a great crisis, not very different from the Arian Crisis. This time it is the modernist crisis and because of this, many have not experienced the deep fruits of the Catholic faith. That being said, I have a great parish and I will remain in communion with Sts. John of the Cross, Teresa of Avila, John Viani, Thomas Aquinas, Therse the Little Flower, Francis of Asisi, Dominic, Padre Pio, Claire, Catherine of Siena, and the countless others in the Holy Cloud of Witnesses. I cannot deny their sanctity and I don't believe such sanctity would be possible if they were worshiping bread and not the living Lord.
That all being said, I will always keep you in my prayers and I wish you the best in your journey to server our common Lord and Savior.

Yes, I agree with you. I believed for a very long time that there was unity in the Catholic Church... but that is not actually true. There has been a great falling away and yet the illusion is that they still are in communion. These Parishes continue to exist and yet are shadow Churches not truly in communion. The teach something loose and vague but altogether alien to that taught by the Vatican. For those of us who can read and do read the CCC. It is a very strange thing indeed.

I only hope and pray that such invisible schism doesn't happen to the Orthodox Church.
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« Reply #183 on: January 26, 2010, 08:08:58 PM »

I am sorry that you have had such bad experience. Lucky for all of us, we know that no matter what our experience, the Lord loves and wants to divnize us.

As for my Parish, we are encouraged to fast and pray. The Rosary is a very important part of our parish life and it is prayed everday before daily mass while people are in line for confession. In fact, my parish offers confession twice every weekday, and three times on Saturday. For every single session of confession, there is a line and you have to be sure to be there early so that you get confession before mass since there are so many confessors. On Sundays we pray the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, and I can't even count all of the people who have made the liturgy of the ours part of their spiritual lives. We have Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament twenty four hours a day. During the Advent season, we have a novena leading up to Christmas with Mass, Confession, and Benediction. During the weeks leading up to Easter we have the Stations of the Cross every Friday with confession, Mass, and Benediction. The priests never give silly penances like "Love the Lord". Instead we are asked to make a Holy Hour with the Blessed Sacrament or pray the Rosary, the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, etc. The adult education courses at my parish are unmatched, and our youth ministry is moving towards a more and more traditional empahsis of the faith. Its a beautiful place and the parishes in my little suburb just north of Albuquerque are the same way. Writting this out just gives me a real peace, and I feel so genuinely greatful that the Lord has given me such a wonderful parish.
I feel you have been robbed in a sense by the parishes you have attended. I agree that in many places in the United States Catholicism is in a great crisis, not very different from the Arian Crisis. This time it is the modernist crisis and because of this, many have not experienced the deep fruits of the Catholic faith. That being said, I have a great parish and I will remain in communion with Sts. John of the Cross, Teresa of Avila, John Viani, Thomas Aquinas, Therse the Little Flower, Francis of Asisi, Dominic, Padre Pio, Claire, Catherine of Siena, and the countless others in the Holy Cloud of Witnesses. I cannot deny their sanctity and I don't believe such sanctity would be possible if they were worshiping bread and not the living Lord.
That all being said, I will always keep you in my prayers and I wish you the best in your journey to server our common Lord and Savior.

Yes, I agree with you. I believed for a very long time that there was unity in the Catholic Church... but that is not actually true. There has been a great falling away and yet the illusion is that they still are in communion. These Parishes continue to exist and yet are shadow Churches not truly in communion. The teach something loose and vague but altogether alien to that taught by the Vatican. For those of us who can read and do read the CCC. It is a very strange thing indeed.

I only hope and pray that such invisible schism doesn't happen to the Orthodox Church.
No, they just have to deal with internal schisms.
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« Reply #184 on: January 27, 2010, 07:49:41 AM »


It's really not 'me'... I honestly think what helps 'me' pray everyday is my family. Some nights I honestly don't feel like praying but my daughter encourages me and other nights I encourage her. It's very nice to pray with family. I really like it when our whole family are involved, including Mom.

There is something about Orthodox Prayers which comes across very nonjudgmental that I find healthy for my daughter too. Looking at the Lord as 'on our side' and seeing sin as 'something other' is good at making my daughter not feel guilty at age seven. That is very important I think to building a canon or rule for them that they are not going to reject in later years.

Yes! I've noticed this too - I like it.

I also like the way that Orthodox prayer is not self-conscious at all.
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« Reply #185 on: January 29, 2010, 10:42:56 AM »

There has been a great falling away and yet the illusion is that they still are in communion. These Parishes continue to exist and yet are shadow Churches not truly in communion. The teach something loose and vague but altogether alien to that taught by the Vatican. For those of us who can read and do read the CCC. It is a very strange thing indeed.

Exactly. The unity that the Pope supposedly brings is an illusion. If the Vatican were to actually enforce Catholic dogma and moral teaching, the RCC would split 3 or 4 different ways. Traditional Catholics, in the US, would go from being a tiny niche within the church to simply being a tiny church.
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ignatius
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« Reply #186 on: January 29, 2010, 11:30:59 AM »

There has been a great falling away and yet the illusion is that they still are in communion. These Parishes continue to exist and yet are shadow Churches not truly in communion. The teach something loose and vague but altogether alien to that taught by the Vatican. For those of us who can read and do read the CCC. It is a very strange thing indeed.

Exactly. The unity that the Pope supposedly brings is an illusion. If the Vatican were to actually enforce Catholic dogma and moral teaching, the RCC would split 3 or 4 different ways. Traditional Catholics, in the US, would go from being a tiny niche within the church to simply being a tiny church.

I think Pope Benedict XVI predicted just that. He said he foresaw a much small yet more devout Catholic Church in our future.
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« Reply #187 on: January 29, 2010, 11:57:24 AM »

I think Pope Benedict XVI predicted just that. He said he foresaw a much small yet more devout Catholic Church in our future.

The common theory is that bishops fear a turn away from modernism will further put the Church out of touch with the culture and also further empty the pews (when, in fact, others theorize, it was modernism, including awkward and rocking new music, that helped empty them to begin with). Where is the move in America to traditionalize?

Interesting is the notion that this Pope not only doesn't care if the Church shrinks, but actually desires such, as long as it purifies -- that Benedict XVI is interested in a purer, more devotional, and stricter Church, citing the strength of the Church in its early history, when it was vastly smaller than the billion-strong institution of our present day, a Church that is large but often in disagreement.
http://catholicanada.com/web/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=725&Itemid=91



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ignatius
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« Reply #188 on: January 29, 2010, 12:11:26 PM »

I think Pope Benedict XVI predicted just that. He said he foresaw a much small yet more devout Catholic Church in our future.

The common theory is that bishops fear a turn away from modernism will further put the Church out of touch with the culture and also further empty the pews (when, in fact, others theorize, it was modernism, including awkward and rocking new music, that helped empty them to begin with). Where is the move in America to traditionalize?

Interesting is the notion that this Pope not only doesn't care if the Church shrinks, but actually desires such, as long as it purifies -- that Benedict XVI is interested in a purer, more devotional, and stricter Church, citing the strength of the Church in its early history, when it was vastly smaller than the billion-strong institution of our present day, a Church that is large but often in disagreement.
http://catholicanada.com/web/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=725&Itemid=91

I don't know if I see a move in America to traditionalize... I for one am interested in a more devout Church... The Bishop of our Diocese will be at our 'contemporary' Parish this Sunday to have a 'Town Hall Meeting'. I've debated if I should even attend knowing my moves to leave Catholicism.
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« Reply #189 on: January 29, 2010, 12:20:06 PM »

I think Pope Benedict XVI predicted just that. He said he foresaw a much small yet more devout Catholic Church in our future.

The common theory is that bishops fear a turn away from modernism will further put the Church out of touch with the culture and also further empty the pews (when, in fact, others theorize, it was modernism, including awkward and rocking new music, that helped empty them to begin with). Where is the move in America to traditionalize?

Interesting is the notion that this Pope not only doesn't care if the Church shrinks, but actually desires such, as long as it purifies -- that Benedict XVI is interested in a purer, more devotional, and stricter Church, citing the strength of the Church in its early history, when it was vastly smaller than the billion-strong institution of our present day, a Church that is large but often in disagreement.
http://catholicanada.com/web/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=725&Itemid=91

I don't know if I see a move in America to traditionalize... I for one am interested in a more devout Church... The Bishop of our Diocese will be at our 'contemporary' Parish this Sunday to have a 'Town Hall Meeting'. I've debated if I should even attend knowing my moves to leave Catholicism.

You are moving to a more traditional catholicism, Pope Benedict has delivered the posibility of celebrating Latin Masses all around the World, You can form a group of catholics in your diosesis that ask your bishop for a mass in latin weekly, so you can gather there to feel traditional mass, though it is not going to be the Novo Ordo mass but the Roman rite, stablished in Vatican II but in Latin.
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ignatius
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« Reply #190 on: January 29, 2010, 12:30:17 PM »

I think Pope Benedict XVI predicted just that. He said he foresaw a much small yet more devout Catholic Church in our future.

The common theory is that bishops fear a turn away from modernism will further put the Church out of touch with the culture and also further empty the pews (when, in fact, others theorize, it was modernism, including awkward and rocking new music, that helped empty them to begin with). Where is the move in America to traditionalize?

Interesting is the notion that this Pope not only doesn't care if the Church shrinks, but actually desires such, as long as it purifies -- that Benedict XVI is interested in a purer, more devotional, and stricter Church, citing the strength of the Church in its early history, when it was vastly smaller than the billion-strong institution of our present day, a Church that is large but often in disagreement.
http://catholicanada.com/web/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=725&Itemid=91

I don't know if I see a move in America to traditionalize... I for one am interested in a more devout Church... The Bishop of our Diocese will be at our 'contemporary' Parish this Sunday to have a 'Town Hall Meeting'. I've debated if I should even attend knowing my moves to leave Catholicism.

You are moving to a more traditional catholicism, Pope Benedict has delivered the posibility of celebrating Latin Masses all around the World, You can form a group of catholics in your diosesis that ask your bishop for a mass in latin weekly, so you can gather there to feel traditional mass, though it is not going to be the Novo Ordo mass but the Roman rite, stablished in Vatican II but in Latin.

We have an indult Tridentine Parish in our Diocese already. In Latin, every Wednesday and Saturday and Sunday (Low and High). We also have a SSPX Chapel too.
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« Reply #191 on: January 29, 2010, 12:42:21 PM »

I think Pope Benedict XVI predicted just that. He said he foresaw a much small yet more devout Catholic Church in our future.

The common theory is that bishops fear a turn away from modernism will further put the Church out of touch with the culture and also further empty the pews (when, in fact, others theorize, it was modernism, including awkward and rocking new music, that helped empty them to begin with). Where is the move in America to traditionalize?

Interesting is the notion that this Pope not only doesn't care if the Church shrinks, but actually desires such, as long as it purifies -- that Benedict XVI is interested in a purer, more devotional, and stricter Church, citing the strength of the Church in its early history, when it was vastly smaller than the billion-strong institution of our present day, a Church that is large but often in disagreement.
http://catholicanada.com/web/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=725&Itemid=91

I don't know if I see a move in America to traditionalize... I for one am interested in a more devout Church... The Bishop of our Diocese will be at our 'contemporary' Parish this Sunday to have a 'Town Hall Meeting'. I've debated if I should even attend knowing my moves to leave Catholicism.
Even though you are leaving, your voice might be useful for those of us who remain.
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« Reply #192 on: January 29, 2010, 01:12:34 PM »


Even though you are leaving, your voice might be useful for those of us who remain.

In all honesty bro I don't see how this will ultimately change things. I've been at this parish for more than 6 years and it's grown more liberal in the last 3 years under the current Pastor. Don't get me wrong I think our Pastor is a wonderful man but he'd be even more wonderful at a Baptist Church...  laugh

Anyways... I'm very serious about moving on and I've been putting this off for years now. I'm not going to fight it anymore and I'm just going to have to leave the Catholic Church to take care of it's own business.

PS: isn't that a sassy pict of my daughter...  Grin
« Last Edit: January 29, 2010, 01:13:06 PM by ignatius » Logged

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« Reply #193 on: February 02, 2010, 12:12:57 AM »

Congradulations on your coming entry into the catechumate... I will keep you in my prayers



May God Grant you many years!!!

David
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« Reply #194 on: February 02, 2010, 12:20:23 AM »

Quote
PS: isn't that a sassy pict of my daughter... 

The current one or the previous one? I thought both were cute  Grin
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« Reply #195 on: February 03, 2010, 11:45:41 AM »

Quote
PS: isn't that a sassy pict of my daughter...  

The current one or the previous one? I thought both were cute  Grin

Both  Cheesy She's going to be a 'great' big Sister!
« Last Edit: February 03, 2010, 11:45:58 AM by ignatius » Logged

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