Author Topic: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars  (Read 8755 times)

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Offline Alveus Lacuna

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Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« on: January 15, 2010, 02:43:45 AM »
So are the lectionary readings the same throughout Orthodoxy regardless of being on the Julian Calendar or the Revised-Julian Calendar because they are based on the movable feasts which are uniform throughout Orthodoxy?

If this is correct, does that mean that the readings in the liturgy are the same every Sunday in all Orthodox Churches (aside from maybe Western Rite), but that the saints commemorated are different?

I suppose if this is the case that the readings might be different depending on when the Great Feasts which are fixed are celebrated, as they probably have accompanying readings.

Anyway, I'm doing too much speculation before the initial question is answered,

Offline Basil 320

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2010, 04:39:49 AM »
Only during the Paschal cycle, when the Churches which are on the Revised Julian Calendar, revert to the Old Calendar for the common celebration of Pascha and related moveable feasts.  In the other periods of the year, the Churches which follow the Revised Julian Calendar, are 13 days ahead of those which have remained on the Julian Calendar.  The readings, commemoration of saints, etc., are the same, but the date is observed on different days. As some Old Calendarists say, "Some feast, while others fast," unfortunately.
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Offline Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2010, 04:54:15 AM »
This begs the question: where can I find an OO lectionary?

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Offline deusveritasest

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2010, 05:03:37 AM »
This begs the question: where can I find an OO lectionary?

Selam

Here's a pretty nice Coptic lectionary:

http://www.copticchurch.net/classes/getLectionary.php
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Offline Gebre Menfes Kidus

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #4 on: January 15, 2010, 05:07:08 AM »
This begs the question: where can I find an OO lectionary?

Selam

Here's a pretty nice Coptic lectionary:

http://www.copticchurch.net/classes/getLectionary.php

Cool. Thanks. :)

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Offline ialmisry

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2010, 07:48:11 AM »
Only during the Paschal cycle, when the Churches which are on the Revised Julian Calendar, revert to the Old Calendar for the common celebration of Pascha and related moveable feasts.  In the other periods of the year, the Churches which follow the Revised Julian Calendar, are 13 days ahead of those which have remained on the Julian Calendar.  The readings, commemoration of saints, etc., are the same, but the date is observed on different days. As some Old Calendarists say, "Some feast, while others fast," unfortunately.

Actually, since the lectionary is based on Pascha (as the OT says, "This shall be for you the first of months...") except when preempted by the Nativity cycle and other feasts, the readings are the same, as they are based on Pentacoast, which of course is based on Pascha.  One reason, perhaps, why the New Calendarists didn't go all the way.
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Offline AWR

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2010, 12:46:13 PM »
What about the the "Lukan Jump"?

This is the interruption of the reading of the Gospel of Matthew after the Elevation of the Holy Cross. This is the middle of September near the Conception of the Forerunner John. (This usually happens around the 18th Sunday after Pentecost).  I would think that the readings would diverge then.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2010, 12:47:40 PM by AWR »

Offline HandmaidenofGod

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #7 on: January 15, 2010, 01:50:32 PM »
What about the the "Lukan Jump"?

This is the interruption of the reading of the Gospel of Matthew after the Elevation of the Holy Cross. This is the middle of September near the Conception of the Forerunner John. (This usually happens around the 18th Sunday after Pentecost).  I would think that the readings would diverge then.


I was just about to say the same thing. :)

It's my understanding that this is something the Slavs do, but not the Greeks.

Is this correct?
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Offline AWR

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #8 on: January 15, 2010, 03:24:30 PM »
What about the the "Lukan Jump"?

This is the interruption of the reading of the Gospel of Matthew after the Elevation of the Holy Cross. This is the middle of September near the Conception of the Forerunner John. (This usually happens around the 18th Sunday after Pentecost).  I would think that the readings would diverge then.


I was just about to say the same thing. :)

It's my understanding that this is something the Slavs do, but not the Greeks.

Is this correct?

I think that it is the other way around. Once everyone did the jump, but then the Slavs stopped.  In resent times, most Slavs returned to the jump.

But for Old and New Calendars, the first Monday after the first Sunday, after the Cross (the day to jump) is not the same.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2010, 03:44:38 PM by AWR »

Offline Father H

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #9 on: January 15, 2010, 05:51:54 PM »
This is correct.   The "Sunday readings" are the same for all from Zacchaeus Sunday through the Holy Cross (i.e. roughly Feb.-Sept).  After the cross, there are 3 distinct possibilities which cause divergence until the return of the next Zacchaeus Sunday:  Lukan jump NC, Lukan jump OC, and non-Lukan jump OC.   

Offline Deacon Lance

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2010, 06:44:13 PM »
In my Byzantine Catholic Metropolia there was no Lukan jump until a few years back when it was reintroduced.  The Lectionary hasn't been reprinted though and the 18th Sunday after Pentecost starts the Sunday reading of the Gospel of St. Luke.  The daily reading begins the Monday after the 17th Sunday after Pentecost.
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Offline scamandrius

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2013, 10:09:38 AM »
Does anyone know when the Slavic churches (I assume those that follow the Mar El Sabbas Typikon) ceased recognizing the Lukan jump?  And when/which jurisdictions then reintroduced it?  Is this something recent that happened with the council called in 1924?
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Offline frjohnmorris

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Re: Lectionary on Old and New Calendars
« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2013, 10:40:45 PM »
Does anyone know when the Slavic churches (I assume those that follow the Mar El Sabbas Typikon) ceased recognizing the Lukan jump?  And when/which jurisdictions then reintroduced it?  Is this something recent that happened with the council called in 1924?

I would think that the calendar would not make any difference except on Great Feasts, because the lectionary depends on the date of Pascha, which is the same regardless of which calendar the parish uses. The Tone of the week would also be the same because when we begin the cycle depends on the date of Pentecost.

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