Author Topic: Pope in the Diptychs  (Read 1534 times)

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Offline Asteriktos

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Pope in the Diptychs
« on: January 20, 2010, 12:02:33 PM »
I've seen people say that the Pope was struck from the diptychs in Constantinople in 1009, and also seen people say that the Pope was struck from the diptychs in Constantinople in 1042. Is one date right and one wrong? Or are they both correct?

EDIT--And I guess I have to make this clear, I'm talking about the Pope of Rome, not another Pope (e.g. of Alexandria) ;)
« Last Edit: January 20, 2010, 12:03:25 PM by Asteriktos »

Offline Shlomlokh

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Re: Pope in the Diptychs
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2010, 02:23:20 PM »
I've seen people say that the Pope was struck from the diptychs in Constantinople in 1009, and also seen people say that the Pope was struck from the diptychs in Constantinople in 1042. Is one date right and one wrong? Or are they both correct?

EDIT--And I guess I have to make this clear, I'm talking about the Pope of Rome, not another Pope (e.g. of Alexandria) ;)

I vaguely recall reading that it was in AD 1014 when the filioque was added to the creed in Rome and chanted in the Mass there. But I am curious as to when it was as well. :)

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Offline Alveus Lacuna

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Re: Pope in the Diptychs
« Reply #2 on: January 20, 2010, 02:25:15 PM »
Really?  'Cause I heard 1036.  JK!  ;D

Offline Papist

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Re: Pope in the Diptychs
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2010, 03:02:11 PM »
Really?  'Cause I heard 1036.  JK!  ;D
Well I heard 1037.5
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Offline ialmisry

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Re: Pope in the Diptychs
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2010, 03:16:25 PM »
I've seen people say that the Pope was struck from the diptychs in Constantinople in 1009, and also seen people say that the Pope was struck from the diptychs in Constantinople in 1042. Is one date right and one wrong? Or are they both correct?

EDIT--And I guess I have to make this clear, I'm talking about the Pope of Rome, not another Pope (e.g. of Alexandria) ;)
The pope of Rome, Sergius IV, in his ascension purtedly sent a letter which included the filoque, and EP Sergius II dropped him from the Diptychs.  The mission of Umbert included putting Rome back in the Diptychs.  Whereas the dropping went on quietly without much fanfare (Rome and the popes were in the Pornocracy, and didn't hold much respect in New Rome), the fantastic hubris of Umbert's mission is what stuck in people's minds. So what had been a theoretical matter became much more concrete and in your face (which, of course, increased with the Crusaders' arrival, which reinvorced the memory of the arrogance of 1054).

Yes, the Filioque became official at King Henry II's coronation at Rome, at his insistence. So much for Caesaropapism being an Eastern thing.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2010, 03:18:03 PM by ialmisry »
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