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Author Topic: Santa Claus???  (Read 8336 times) Average Rating: 0
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Carole
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« Reply #45 on: December 10, 2009, 09:11:32 AM »

We never engaged in the Santa myth with our child. 

I simply decided that I didn't want to lie to my daughter.  So right from the very beginning we told her that Santa was just a story, a myth, a symbol of generosity (we were atheists at the time), that some people choose to pretend that he is real and that is okay, but we have to be very careful not to tell other children that he's not real. 

It worked pretty well.  She never, to our knowledge, spilled the beans to another child who did believe in Santa.  And she disproved all of the people who swore to me that I was depriving her of something necessary to fuel her imagination by being a reasonably well-adjusted teen with a vivid imagination - without the benefit of believing in Santa.
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Carole
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« Reply #46 on: December 10, 2009, 04:43:12 PM »

No disdain at all. Just pointing out that in the larger Orthodox world the practice is unknown.

Since I'm not familiar with every corner of the larger Orthodox world, I'll take your word for it. However in my OCA parish, we begin the Divine Liturgy at midnight on Christmas Eve. Also a Greek Orthodox bishop I know has instructed his priests that the Divine Liturgy should begin as close to midnight as the Divine Liturgy on Pascha.
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"If but ten of us lead a holy life, we shall kindle a fire which shall light up the entire city."

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augustin717
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« Reply #47 on: December 11, 2009, 02:18:18 AM »

No disdain at all. Just pointing out that in the larger Orthodox world the practice is unknown.

Since I'm not familiar with every corner of the larger Orthodox world, I'll take your word for it. However in my OCA parish, we begin the Divine Liturgy at midnight on Christmas Eve. Also a Greek Orthodox bishop I know has instructed his priests that the Divine Liturgy should begin as close to midnight as the Divine Liturgy on Pascha.
I even hate to say it-but the typikon doesn't provide for a midnight liturgy at Christmas.
It does provide for one at Easter, though.
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katherineofdixie
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« Reply #48 on: December 11, 2009, 10:35:01 AM »

No disdain at all. Just pointing out that in the larger Orthodox world the practice is unknown.

Since I'm not familiar with every corner of the larger Orthodox world, I'll take your word for it. However in my OCA parish, we begin the Divine Liturgy at midnight on Christmas Eve. Also a Greek Orthodox bishop I know has instructed his priests that the Divine Liturgy should begin as close to midnight as the Divine Liturgy on Pascha.
I even hate to say it-but the typikon doesn't provide for a midnight liturgy at Christmas.
It does provide for one at Easter, though.

Can you provide me with the particular information from the typikon? A quote from the Bishop's letter to his priests:"I have concluded that we must abide by the “taxis” of our liturgical life to provide continuity...to the Nativity Schedule in keeping with the Typikon. The Nativity Divine Liturgy should take place close to midnight as we offer for our Pascha celebration. "
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"If but ten of us lead a holy life, we shall kindle a fire which shall light up the entire city."

 St. John Chrysostom
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« Reply #49 on: December 13, 2009, 10:01:10 PM »

No disdain at all. Just pointing out that in the larger Orthodox world the practice is unknown.

Since I'm not familiar with every corner of the larger Orthodox world, I'll take your word for it. However in my OCA parish, we begin the Divine Liturgy at midnight on Christmas Eve. Also a Greek Orthodox bishop I know has instructed his priests that the Divine Liturgy should begin as close to midnight as the Divine Liturgy on Pascha.

My parish does this as well for Christmas Eve. We're in the Bulgarian diocese.

In Christ,
Andrew
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"I will pour out my prayer unto the Lord, and to Him will I proclaim my grief; for with evils my soul is filled, and my life unto hades hath drawn nigh, and like Jonah I will pray: From corruption raise me up, O God." -Ode VI, Irmos of the Supplicatory Canon to the Theotokos
augustin717
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« Reply #50 on: December 13, 2009, 10:23:54 PM »

The typikon only provides for two situations regarding both Christmas&The Lord's Baptism, neither of them having any provision for a midnight liturgy of St. John Chrysostom. In some situations there should be a vesperal liturgy (St. Basil's) on the eve of the feasts, the royal hours and the vigil, but never is there mentioned any midnight liturgy.
Plus, it is telling that these midnight liturgies seem to be confined to parishes in America, and not in the Old World. A more plausible explanation for them would be twofold:
1. Fulfilling the liturgical obligations of the day as early in the day as possible, so that the rest of the day can be spent within the family, as is the custom here.
2. Roman Catholic (perhaps even Protestant) influence/inspiration, since these traditions have a midnight service on Christmas , the Catholics actually having three masses.
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sprtslvr1973
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« Reply #51 on: December 14, 2009, 10:48:02 AM »

I am pretty undecided. I too HATE the commercialism that has overrun the holiday. But...is telling children a story that revolves largely around morality and life lessons really so bad? If you behave you will be rewarded, if not you sacrifice those rewards.

I was about 7 or 8 when a kid told the group that his mom quote "admitted" (as if a parent is the kid's target of questioning) that Santa was make-believe. When I relayed this to my own mom she said something like '[sigh]It's usually the parents'. I don't remember being too disappointed, let alone like I had been lied to. I guess finding out the truth was a minor rite of passage, like kids used to eventually learn the truth about "The Stork". I think that as with a magic show the audience (kids) want to believe there is something they don't see and are willing to suspend disbelief for a moment.

Maybe I am a naive optimist, but I am inclined to believe we can find some happy medium. A good example is that as a very young kid one of my best friends, (whom I am blessed to still be close to) group in a staunch Southern Baptist home. His parents/church taught him to be ready to share his faith from before he could ride a bike. Nevertheless his parents apparently saw no harm in telling him and his little sister that Santa would be dropping by. By the way that family was also fine with Halloween too. Again These things from a very conservative Christian family.

Merry Christmas!
« Last Edit: December 14, 2009, 10:48:49 AM by sprtslvr1973 » Logged

"Into thy hands I commend my spirit"- Luke 23:46
“Lord, I believe; help my unbelief!” - Mark 9:24
Tags: nativity saints Santa Claus 
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