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Author Topic: School Religion Worksheet  (Read 10339 times) Average Rating: 0
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« Reply #45 on: December 16, 2009, 04:06:13 PM »

Roll Eyes I only brought the chorus bit up because it seemed to be most relevant. I certainly remember having "Christmas pizza parties" (not holiday parties) and "Christmas break" (not Kwanzaa break) in public school. I remember making an off hand remark that certain Christian teachers found disrespectful in school, and they called in my parents because I would dare to speak ill of Christianity. Anyway, I could go on, but the point is, Christianity has not been as removed from public schools as some posters might think it has. I doubt things have changed much since I was in school in the early 90's.

You might be surprised.
Indeed, the situation that he describes is a complete reversal of the modern reality.
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« Reply #46 on: December 16, 2009, 04:07:48 PM »

I would be astounded if there is ever anything positive regarding Christianity.
Same here.

A friend, who had his daughter in public school, attended her 'Winter Celebration' event at school. They sang songs about snow, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and the Solstice; conspicuous in its absence was any mention of Christmas.

Typical.

What a shame that money coerced from us is spent in such a manner.

When my daughter was at elementary school, in Seattle of the early 1990-s, it was even worse. We, the parents, were invited to what was called a "winter holiday party." The kids showed a play that was entirely about Africa, lions, the jungle, and Kwanzaa. There was no mentioning not only of Christmas, but even of things like frost, snow, or fur trees.  laugh
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« Reply #47 on: December 16, 2009, 04:18:21 PM »


But they don't: they don't there and they don't here.  

They don't or they can't?  You make it sound like it is sheerly impossible to change a culture.

Sure can.  But not by denying that there is something wrong with it.

And IIRC, we were talking about a religion, certain sects of which are beyond repair.

But the objective of the school is not to pronounce one religion wrong and another right, and indeed that is the point of separation of church and state.  What the schools are trying to do is simply introduce the idea that other religions are out there, people worship differently, and that they should not be persecuted simply because they're different.  I agree with the schools on this that there should be no judgement therein because that would have the appearance that the school is endorsing one or the other. 

And IIRC, religion is integral to culture.  In whose judgement are certain sects "beyond repair", Isa?

Quote
Quote
It's very difficult and takes a lot of time but it's possible.  It wasn't so long ago that you had to sit at the back of the bus if you were black.  African Americans still deal with racism today but we're slowly changing people's minds.  

You have to show them that they are in the wrong first.  Islamists do not take constructive criticism from infidels.

All Islamists, huh?  Wink


Quote
Quote
 
Quote
If may want to make a distinction as to jurisdiction and law between here and there, but they a la fatwah against Salman Rushdie, do not.

I'm afraid I don't understand what you're saying here.

That if you think you being in SW MO makes a difference to Islamists, think again.

Um... ok.  The sentence structure in the original quote makes no sense to me, so I'm not even sure how you got that idea from it. 

Quote
Quote
I didn't say you did say anything racist, but the situation you describe is racism, IMO.  I know there are cruel people in the world and I agree that we also have to teach our children to be wise as serpents, etc., etc.  But then again, when you say people with beards and prayer callouses are going to hurt you, can you be 100% sure that every single one of those people is out to get you?  Is there really no such thing as a non-violent devout Muslim (e.g.)?

Sure. Can you tell the difference?

I don't know any Muslims personally, to be honest, so I wouldn't be able to on my present experience.  So enlighten me, what is the difference?


Quote
How would you interpret this "scripture"?:
Quote
O you who believe! do not take the Jews and the Christians for friends; they are friends of each other; and whoever amongst you takes them for a friend, then surely he is one of them; surely Allah does not guide the unjust people. Qur'an 5:51
Quote
Fight those who do not believe in Allah, nor in the latter day, nor do they prohibit what Allah and His Messenger have prohibited, nor follow the religion of truth, out of those who have been given the Book, until they pay the tax in acknowledgment of superiority and they are in a state of subjection. 9:29.

You really expect me to apply a, what, 1300-ish year old text to a person in the world today?  When someone says "Oh, those Christians are horrible people and I want nothing to do with them," do you not think to yourself, "Hey, we're not all alike, don't judge me by someone else's actions"? 


Quote
Quote
but I don't think Christ called anyone His enemy until they identified themselves as His enemy.  For us to do the same requires us to have either supernatural discernment or to know the individual instead of relying on racial/religious stereotypes to think for us.

Actually, quite the opposite: He did not need man's testimony about a man, for he knew what was in a man.  John 2:25.

Indeed, He did.  But do you?  Do any of us, outside of the few deified on Earth, have the ability to know the heart of men without having met them before?  Again, I say
Quote
For us to do the same requires us to have either supernatural discernment or to know the individual instead of relying on racial/religious stereotypes to think for us.

Quote
Not all of them are that dangerous. Some are safe for our purposes.  I once was fine going to a Shi'ite shrine in Damascus filled with Iranian pilgrims, with a group of Hizbullah (with guns) who knew I had not submitted to Islam (btw, you are better off with Shi'ites then with Sunnis).  And I don't blend in the Middle East crowd: I'm quite white with blue eyes.  But I know what to say, ask etc. and handle a situation to winnow the Muslim wheat from the Islamist chaff.  I don't think you do.  Therefore, play it safe.

But again, you're categorizing people under a label and that, in effect, dehumanizes them.  I don't doubt that you can make your way around the culture and I admit that I'm fairly ignorant of Middle Eastern custom, but I still don't believe that every single Sunni is out to get me. 
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« Reply #48 on: December 16, 2009, 04:28:35 PM »

Roll Eyes I only brought the chorus bit up because it seemed to be most relevant. I certainly remember having "Christmas pizza parties" (not holiday parties) and "Christmas break" (not Kwanzaa break) in public school. I remember making an off hand remark that certain Christian teachers found disrespectful in school, and they called in my parents because I would dare to speak ill of Christianity. Anyway, I could go on, but the point is, Christianity has not been as removed from public schools as some posters might think it has. I doubt things have changed much since I was in school in the early 90's.

The biggest factor is always the school administration.  I know some public schools that are completely secular (no mention of religion of any sorts is allowed), some that allow displays of "minority faiths", and others that have no problem with religion.

Good point Smiley
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« Reply #49 on: December 16, 2009, 04:44:43 PM »

But a lot of problems could be circumvented if parents would just teach children some manners. Just tell them some families do things a little differently and we shouldn't make fun of them. I don't think most 1st or 2nd graders care about theology. They can learn about different religions when they're older.

Sure, manners would certainly help but it's not just a matter of keeping them from bullying each other.  Religion is a major factor in the course of human history, sociology, psychology, culinary practices, hygiene, politics, etc.  I would venture to say there is no subject taught that wasn't influenced at some point by religion; to understand our world today, we have to understand where we came from.  I'm not saying they need a masterclass in theology to learn about Islam.  As Tina pointed out, the worksheet just talked about the Ramadan holiday, who Mohammed was, etc.  In the words of David Letterman, 'nuff said. 

The other benefit to this that I see is that the more we teach our children about other cultures and religions, the less there is to fear.  Sensationalist journalism has banked on paranoia and fear of the unnamed "Them" to the point that I daily hear people calling anyone vaguely brown-skinned "towelheads" or whatever other disparaging and ingnorant names they can think of.  Children need to know that people are just different in some ways but deep down we're all human beings just trying to get through life, provide for our families, and hopefully come out a little better in the end for it all.  There's no reason to fear and hate each other because someone looks or acts differently.

No, they aren't.  Christians in the Middle East, for example, know to keep aware from men with beards and a callous dot on their forehead.  For their own safety.

Maybe we will send you  some down from Thomson to teach y'all there.

We're not talking about Christians in the Middle East.  What they teach their kids is up to them.  Even so, if everyone, "men with beards and callous dots" included, taught their children not to hate and fear we might have a nicer world.

But they don't: they don't there and they don't here. 

They don't or they can't?  You make it sound like it is sheerly impossible to change a culture.

Sure can.  But not by denying that there is something wrong with it.

And IIRC, we were talking about a religion, certain sects of which are beyond repair.

Quote
It's very difficult and takes a lot of time but it's possible.  It wasn't so long ago that you had to sit at the back of the bus if you were black.  African Americans still deal with racism today but we're slowly changing people's minds. 

You have to show them that they are in the wrong first.  Islamists do not take constructive criticism from infidels.


Quote
 
Quote
If may want to make a distinction as to jurisdiction and law between here and there, but they a la fatwah against Salman Rushdie, do not.

I'm afraid I don't understand what you're saying here.

That if you think you being in SW MO makes a difference to Islamists, think again.



Quote
Quote
Quote
but children don't start out life with burning racism in their veins.

I didn't say anything racist: just the FACT that there are those out there who want to hurt you.

I didn't say you did say anything racist, but the situation you describe is racism, IMO.  I know there are cruel people in the world and I agree that we also have to teach our children to be wise as serpents, etc., etc.  But then again, when you say people with beards and prayer callouses are going to hurt you, can you be 100% sure that every single one of those people is out to get you?  Is there really no such thing as a non-violent devout Muslim (e.g.)?

Sure. Can you tell the difference?


Quote
Quote
Quote
If they can be taught to hate, can they not be taught to love?

I'm all for loving your enemy, but to do that you have to be capable of identifying your enemy.

My question, though, is who decides they're your enemy?  Maybe I am naive, as you say, and maybe I misinterpret the scriptures I read,

How would you interpret this "scripture"?:
Quote
O you who believe! do not take the Jews and the Christians for friends; they are friends of each other; and whoever amongst you takes them for a friend, then surely he is one of them; surely Allah does not guide the unjust people. Qur'an 5:51
Quote
Fight those who do not believe in Allah, nor in the latter day, nor do they prohibit what Allah and His Messenger have prohibited, nor follow the religion of truth, out of those who have been given the Book, until they pay the tax in acknowledgment of superiority and they are in a state of subjection. 9:29.

Not that that matters: it matters how the bloke with his finger on the trigger interprets them.

Btw, the Muslim commentators take it that Sura 9 does not start with the Basmallah, because it is devoid of mercy.


Quote
but I don't think Christ called anyone His enemy until they identified themselves as His enemy.  For us to do the same requires us to have either supernatural discernment or to know the individual instead of relying on racial/religious stereotypes to think for us.

Actually, quite the opposite: He did not need man's testimony about a man, for he knew what was in a man.  John 2:25.

Not all of them are that dangerous. Some are safe for our purposes.  I once was fine going to a Shi'ite shrine in Damascus filled with Iranian pilgrims, with a group of Hizbullah (with guns) who knew I had not submitted to Islam (btw, you are better off with Shi'ites then with Sunnis).  And I don't blend in the Middle East crowd: I'm quite white with blue eyes.  But I know what to say, ask etc. and handle a situation to winnow the Muslim wheat from the Islamist chaff.  I don't think you do.  Therefore, play it safe.

Er, as somebody who does know quite a few Muslims and grew up with some of them, I'm slightly confused at your confidence that you know how to 'handle a situation' with them! How very patronizing to tell others to 'play it safe', as if danger is something to be expected. I find this particularly irritating living in a country where, up until quite recently, the biggest terrorist thread was from white Christians.
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« Reply #50 on: December 16, 2009, 05:07:43 PM »

Roll Eyes I only brought the chorus bit up because it seemed to be most relevant. I certainly remember having "Christmas pizza parties" (not holiday parties) and "Christmas break" (not Kwanzaa break) in public school. I remember making an off hand remark that certain Christian teachers found disrespectful in school, and they called in my parents because I would dare to speak ill of Christianity. Anyway, I could go on, but the point is, Christianity has not been as removed from public schools as some posters might think it has. I doubt things have changed much since I was in school in the early 90's.

You might be surprised.

Perhaps you are correct.
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« Reply #51 on: December 16, 2009, 05:40:31 PM »

I'd just like to say I'm impressed with anyone who can keep track of a quotation string that scrolls down for 2 feet. 
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« Reply #52 on: December 16, 2009, 05:50:26 PM »

I'd just like to say I'm impressed with anyone who can keep track of a quotation string that scrolls down for 2 feet. 

Ooh - on that note, mods, is it considered rude/against forum rules to delete backlog when quoting? (Please say it's not).
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« Reply #53 on: December 16, 2009, 06:00:40 PM »

I gotta agree with the 'not their place' crowd. Its not that the schools are trying to teach 'multiculturalism" at all. Its a lot of pc nonsense but it doesn't teach any greater respect when certain faiths are conspicuously left out. Even here in the South in little county schools its verboten to say "Christmas" or "Easter", so its trickled its way throughout our land. By limiting even the speech of this particular holiday and its specific terminology, they are excising out one particular faith. There is really no such thing as Kwanzaa, except here. Its invention can be dated specifically here and nowhere else. A peculiar thing. Islam's effort to put pc icing via our smallest beings and most vulnerable minds is particularly fishy. 

I don't believe a child has been planted and rooted strongly enough in their own faith by the age of 7 to be dealing with the various nuances of other faiths. Furthermore, ps kids spend more time under that regime than they do at home with only their family/faith around them. Who is going to win in that tug of war. Sure, by the time kids have reached rhetoric stage they must face the reality around them, but not before their minds and intellect have caught up to their exposures should that happen. And no, that doesn't mean leave them in a bubble, but I am not one to let others program my kids training.
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« Reply #54 on: December 16, 2009, 06:01:00 PM »

Ooh - on that note, mods, is it considered rude/against forum rules to delete backlog when quoting? (Please say it's not).

Absolutely not against the rules.  Heck, I do it all the time Smiley
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« Reply #55 on: December 16, 2009, 06:02:49 PM »

I'd just like to say I'm impressed with anyone who can keep track of a quotation string that scrolls down for 2 feet. 

Ooh - on that note, mods, is it considered rude/against forum rules to delete backlog when quoting? (Please say it's not).

Not at all; I did it myself in this thread.  Sometimes it's more confusing to include the whole backlog, so I just try to quote the last applicable thought.  I've found that with some posters, though, their fragmented statements don't make as much sense if the whole backlog isn't included so I sometimes have a long string of nested quotes of back and forth.  
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« Reply #56 on: December 16, 2009, 06:13:01 PM »

Ooh - on that note, mods, is it considered rude/against forum rules to delete backlog when quoting? (Please say it's not).

Absolutely not against the rules.  Heck, I do it all the time Smiley

Excellent. Thanks very much Smiley
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« Reply #57 on: December 16, 2009, 06:21:36 PM »

I'm all for keeping religion out of the classroom; but that simply means it's not preached, philosophical and epistemological questions are left to ones own consideration. How do you propose to teach the history of Europe, much less the history of several regions, without introducing Islam? Even the study of American history, especially our first war as a Constitutional Republic, requires at least a cursory understanding of Islam. Historical instruction about religion (and even some minor doctrinal issues, to explain the reformation and related conflicts, for example) is essential to the instruction of history. We may not be happy about the influence of some religions (or any religion), but that doesn't make it any less essential to the understanding of the past. There are many 'bad things' that happened throughout history, it does no one any good to whitewash them or, even worse, to ignore them. The key is that everything is taught objectively, but for goodness sake, teach it. History is more than feel-good narratives and nationalistic inspiration.
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« Reply #58 on: December 16, 2009, 06:29:39 PM »

^This. 

The worksheet in the OP sounds more like a general overview of Ramadan, not a treatise on theology.  It's a molehill, not a mountain.
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« Reply #59 on: December 18, 2009, 12:02:05 PM »

In Georgia, in the middle schools, they have some kind of World Religions course (the kids can't read or write or do simple arithmetic, but apparently there's time in a busy school day for this). Recently the only speaker to address a school assembly was Muslim.

I have no problem with kids learning about other religions, though I think "normal" school subjects should take precedence.

I'm still waiting for the Christian, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu etc. speakers, however.
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« Reply #60 on: December 18, 2009, 02:14:11 PM »

I'd just like to say I'm impressed with anyone who can keep track of a quotation string that scrolls down for 2 feet. 

This quite literally made me laugh out loud!
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« Reply #61 on: December 18, 2009, 02:38:17 PM »

I'd just like to say I'm impressed with anyone who can keep track of a quotation string that scrolls down for 2 feet. 

This quite literally made me laugh out loud!

Me too, albeit guiltily  Embarrassed
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« Reply #62 on: December 18, 2009, 02:55:21 PM »

In Georgia, in the middle schools, they have some kind of World Religions course (the kids can't read or write or do simple arithmetic, but apparently there's time in a busy school day for this). Recently the only speaker to address a school assembly was Muslim.

I have no problem with kids learning about other religions, though I think "normal" school subjects should take precedence.

I'm still waiting for the Christian, Jewish, Buddhist, Hindu etc. speakers, however.

Don't hold your breath!

The PC Intelligentsia (PCI) will do what will get them pats on the back by their peers.

Don't ever expect a Christian speaker. Christianity, according to PC dogma is an imperialistic religion that has wiped out indigenous cultures wherever it has been preached. The only religion permitted to do that is Islam (only the PCI will never admit that Islam has done/does that). Therefore PC promotes the pagan, animist, and aboriginal religions that Christianity is seen as having squelched.

The PCI also will side with Islam because it will help them in inhibiting Christianity. Generally, the PCI hates Christianity and Western Culture. It is culturally and historically self-hating and nihilistic. It bites the hand that has fed it in terms of the liberal (in the original sense of allowing openness and inquiry) and humane cultural moorings that it is heir to.

The Jewish religion may get some positive treatment, but there is a growing trend toward criticising Judaism because of Zionist extremes. Zionism thus becomes a backdoor for anti-Semitic sentiements, even among the PC.

Hindus, due to their proximity to radical Islamicists in their homelands -- (here I would like to make a quick point to a post further up [it was a reply to a previous post]: not all devout Muslims are intent on violence, but all devout Islamicists probably are, or at least support the concept) -- may say something critical of Islam, so they may be near the bottom of the list of speakers.

Buddhism might get the nod, but animists and neo-pagans are so much more exciting and so more likely to be offensive to conservative Christians that they are the more likely candidates!
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« Reply #63 on: December 18, 2009, 03:06:27 PM »



From www.orthodoxmom.com



T'was the month before Christmas

T'was the month before Christmas
When all through our land,
Not a Christian was praying
Nor taking a stand.
Why the Politically Correct Police had taken away,
The reason for Christmas - no one could say.
The children were told by their schools not to sing,
About Shepherds and Wise Men and Angels and things.
It might hurt people's feelings, the teachers would say
December 25th is just a " Holiday ".
Yet the shoppers were ready with cash, checks and credit
Pushing folks down to the floor just to get it!
CDs from Madonna, an X BOX, an I-pod
Something was changing, something quite odd!
Retailers promoted Ramadan and Kwanzaa
In hopes to sell books by Franken & Fonda.
As Targets were hanging their trees upside down
At Lowe's the word Christmas - was no where to be found.
At K-Mart and Staples and Penny's and Sears
You won't hear the word Christmas; it won't touch your ears.
Inclusive, sensitive, Di-ver-si-ty
Are words that were used to intimidate me.
Now Daschle, Now Darden, Now Sharpton, Wolf Blitzen
On Boxer, on Rather, on Kerry, on Clinton !
At the top of the Senate, there arose such a clatter
To eliminate Jesus, in all public matter.
And we spoke not a word, as they took away our faith
Forbidden to speak of salvation and grace.
The true Gift of Christmas was exchanged and discarded
The reason for the season, stopped before it started.
So as you celebrate "Winter Break"
under your "Dream Tree"
Sipping your Starbucks, listen to me.
Choose your words carefully, choose what you say
Shout MERRY CHRISTMAS,
not Happy Holidays!

-author unknown

Lets not forget the true meaning of Christmas--Our Christ's Nativity!

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« Reply #64 on: December 18, 2009, 03:21:02 PM »

For those of you who have suggested the schools won't have a presentation about Christianity, have you asked them if they're going to?  It seems to me that most American schools assume that kids are going to be familiar with Christianity and therefore want to spend time on religions not so familiar to them.  Maybe instead of congratulating ourselves on exposing the supposed conspiracy it would be better to become involved in the school system.  Teachers and administration actually are open to suggestions, believe it or not.
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« Reply #65 on: December 18, 2009, 04:29:41 PM »

For those of you who have suggested the schools won't have a presentation about Christianity, have you asked them if they're going to?  It seems to me that most American schools assume that kids are going to be familiar with Christianity and therefore want to spend time on religions not so familiar to them.  Maybe instead of congratulating ourselves on exposing the supposed conspiracy it would be better to become involved in the school system.  Teachers and administration actually are open to suggestions, believe it or not.
The liability lawyers are not.

I had a friend who also taught in the Chicago Public Schools, English Literature.  She was dismayed by the ignorance the students had about Christianity that they were reading in the literature, and which symbolism was important to understand the work. She was liberal, of the Iowa Caucas type.

Two years ago, I remember sitting in the teachers lounge while a certain English teacher went on and on-to no one in particular-on how "could anyone vote for Huckabey? You can see that he is a Fundamentalist!"  The idea of that being attractive wasn't in her universe.

I think the larger system, heavy laden with the education establishment is less open.  My sons' school in the suburbs, in contrast, had St. Nicholas day: the number of Polish immigrants made it "ethnic/multicultural."  I had them bring their icons so they could see what St. Nicholas really looked like.  Nothing like Santa Claus.
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« Reply #66 on: December 18, 2009, 05:13:46 PM »

For those of you who have suggested the schools won't have a presentation about Christianity, have you asked them if they're going to?  It seems to me that most American schools assume that kids are going to be familiar with Christianity and therefore want to spend time on religions not so familiar to them.  Maybe instead of congratulating ourselves on exposing the supposed conspiracy it would be better to become involved in the school system.  Teachers and administration actually are open to suggestions, believe it or not.
The liability lawyers are not.

Can you provide some evidence, please?  I don't doubt it's out there, just curious to read what makes you say this.

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I had a friend who also taught in the Chicago Public Schools, English Literature.  She was dismayed by the ignorance the students had about Christianity that they were reading in the literature, and which symbolism was important to understand the work. She was liberal, of the Iowa Caucas type.

In that context, I see nothing wrong with discussing how literature has been traditionally interpreted, or how the author intended the symbolism to be interpreted.  Not sure why her political stance matters a lick.

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Two years ago, I remember sitting in the teachers lounge while a certain English teacher went on and on-to no one in particular-on how "could anyone vote for Huckabey? You can see that he is a Fundamentalist!"  The idea of that being attractive wasn't in her universe.

Also not sure how this relates to the OP or my reply above. 

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I think the larger system, heavy laden with the education establishment is less open.  My sons' school in the suburbs, in contrast, had St. Nicholas day: the number of Polish immigrants made it "ethnic/multicultural."  I had them bring their icons so they could see what St. Nicholas really looked like.  Nothing like Santa Claus.

That's pretty cool.  See, schools can work with the community's culture to help them understand each other.  Hot dog!
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« Reply #67 on: December 18, 2009, 05:41:44 PM »

For those of you who have suggested the schools won't have a presentation about Christianity, have you asked them if they're going to?  It seems to me that most American schools assume that kids are going to be familiar with Christianity and therefore want to spend time on religions not so familiar to them.  Maybe instead of congratulating ourselves on exposing the supposed conspiracy it would be better to become involved in the school system.  Teachers and administration actually are open to suggestions, believe it or not.

Actually, I did. I emailed the principal the day it happened, as well as the Board of Education, as did many other parents.

All of us are still waiting for an answer to our emails, much less a speaker.

I don't know about where you live, but even here in the buckle on the Bible Belt, kids are not familiar with Christian teachings and history.

My experience and observation, FWIW, no activity or information that smacks of Christianity is welcomed with open arms by teachers or principals.

And remember, the only speaker was Muslim. I would assume, rightly or wrongly, that kids around here would be just as clueless about Hinduism as they are about Islam, yet despite its proximity to a huge Hindu Temple, no Hindu speaker was scheduled at the school.
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« Reply #68 on: December 18, 2009, 06:30:52 PM »

For those of you who have suggested the schools won't have a presentation about Christianity, have you asked them if they're going to?  It seems to me that most American schools assume that kids are going to be familiar with Christianity and therefore want to spend time on religions not so familiar to them.  Maybe instead of congratulating ourselves on exposing the supposed conspiracy it would be better to become involved in the school system.  Teachers and administration actually are open to suggestions, believe it or not.

Actually, I did. I emailed the principal the day it happened, as well as the Board of Education, as did many other parents.

All of us are still waiting for an answer to our emails, much less a speaker.

Good!  Hopefully they'll take your request into consideration in good time.

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I don't know about where you live, but even here in the buckle on the Bible Belt, kids are not familiar with Christian teachings and history.

I'm in SW Missouri and it's really the same here as well.  The thing here is that Protestant churches make up the majority of worship traditions here, so it would be really nice to give the kids better exposure to Catholic and Orthodox traditions.  (Actually, now that I think about it, the Roman Catholic church also has a fair amount of representation in the area.)


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And remember, the only speaker was Muslim. I would assume, rightly or wrongly, that kids around here would be just as clueless about Hinduism as they are about Islam, yet despite its proximity to a huge Hindu Temple, no Hindu speaker was scheduled at the school.

Hm... interesting.  Keep us updated!  I'd like to hear if they do include other speakers.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2009, 11:25:05 AM by EofK » Logged

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« Reply #69 on: December 23, 2009, 01:47:27 AM »

As I high school student, myself, I have to say I am skeptical of any introduction of religion into the public school system. For me it also started with an introduction of "basic religions" in elementary school which gives them free reign in high school to criticize these religions. In biology, while learning about evolution we watched a two hour long movie about the stupidity of ID, including interviews from science professionals admonishing the stupidity of Christians in actually believing the "creation myth".  In English, we learned about how Christianity invented the devil  and hell to control societies and how it forces people to live incomplete lives by subjecting them to constant guilt. In history, teachers commonly call Orthodox Christianity, "Catholicism" because few really care about the difference and would hate to take time from their lessons to actually explain what Orthodoxy is since few students actually know. Although I can only speak from my experiences, and those of my close friends, allowing the school to "teach" their students about religion under the guise of PC-ness only raises the tolerance level of what they will hear concerning religion. Although most of the time it's not that bad, certain experiences mark me. For example, after watching the ID-bashing biology video, someone raised their hand and asked "Wait, so people actually believe that someone created the world?" and my teacher said "I know, isn't that weird?" and the whole class laughed. Obviously their introduction to religion didn't teach them that some people actually believe in them, and for juniors in high school that's downright embarrassing. The school has no business meddling in people's religious lives, it breeds ignorance and misunderstanding more than it encourages acceptance of all persons.
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« Reply #70 on: December 23, 2009, 11:27:31 AM »

As I high school student, myself, I have to say I am skeptical of any introduction of religion into the public school system. For me it also started with an introduction of "basic religions" in elementary school which gives them free reign in high school to criticize these religions. In biology, while learning about evolution we watched a two hour long movie about the stupidity of ID, including interviews from science professionals admonishing the stupidity of Christians in actually believing the "creation myth".  In English, we learned about how Christianity invented the devil  and hell to control societies and how it forces people to live incomplete lives by subjecting them to constant guilt. In history, teachers commonly call Orthodox Christianity, "Catholicism" because few really care about the difference and would hate to take time from their lessons to actually explain what Orthodoxy is since few students actually know. Although I can only speak from my experiences, and those of my close friends, allowing the school to "teach" their students about religion under the guise of PC-ness only raises the tolerance level of what they will hear concerning religion. Although most of the time it's not that bad, certain experiences mark me. For example, after watching the ID-bashing biology video, someone raised their hand and asked "Wait, so people actually believe that someone created the world?" and my teacher said "I know, isn't that weird?" and the whole class laughed. Obviously their introduction to religion didn't teach them that some people actually believe in them, and for juniors in high school that's downright embarrassing. The school has no business meddling in people's religious lives, it breeds ignorance and misunderstanding more than it encourages acceptance of all persons.

Excellent points, and welcome to the forum!
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« Reply #71 on: March 16, 2010, 12:16:04 AM »

Just thought I'd share my first experience with "multiculturism" in the public schools.  When I came home yesterday I went through my kids' homework and take home papers and found my 2nd grader had completed a worksheet in class about the holiday of Ramadan and the religion of Islam.  I was kind of surprised but maybe I shouldn't have been.  What won't be a surprise is when the class fails to do one about Christianity and the celebration of Christmas. 

hmm....I alwayse thought that it ws funny that in the 7th grade we learned about Islam, Taoism, Buddism, Shintoism, and other eastern religions....eccept Christianity!
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