Author Topic: What is Convertitis?  (Read 20394 times)

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Offline Riddikulus

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Re: Convertitis
« Reply #45 on: December 23, 2009, 08:37:51 PM »
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But a big factor too is to make sure the conversion is a real conversion and not a temporary "I'm unhappy with my current parish, I want to experiment" phase.
Well trust me, if my wife is in agreement with me on converting and we tell our pastors and friends in leadership that we are becoming Orthodox, I'm not expecting they'll be happy for us. At that point turning back won't be an option.

A few years ago a friend of mine who was a worship leader at a Baptist Church announced that he and his wife were becoming Catholic. This was after taking a class in Church History that was part of some courses he was taking. I think I'm the only person who still talks to them.

I think you should be prepared for different responses; depending on the makeup of the person reacting to your conversion. When hubby and I were preparing to convert, and I honestly believe that we tried to withdraw from our previous situation as tactfully as possible, we got every kind of emotionally manipulative tactic thrown at us; from the silent treatment to lamentations of betrayal. Some confused folk, who I had not realised to be anti-Catholic, reared back in horror and could only think of nasty things to say about the Pope as if that defended their own doctrine against the assault of our silent yet obvious denial. While some brought down the "cone of silence", others played the "loyalty card". Didn't we know that we taking the word of long gone ancients we had never met over opinions of friends and family; people we should trust? Depending on how involved you are with your present church, you should be prepared for people to react in shock, fear and anger. These are the very human tendancies of those who can't accept that someone is actually disagreeing with them and doing something about it. My advice, is to understand their disappointment and show them all the love you can while simply getting on with what you need to do.  

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I understand that if I convert I'm voiding years of my Bapticostal Christian experience.

What do you mean by voiding?
« Last Edit: December 23, 2009, 09:07:01 PM by Riddikulus »
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Online Asteriktos

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Re: Convertitis
« Reply #46 on: December 23, 2009, 09:10:07 PM »
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But a big factor too is to make sure the conversion is a real conversion and not a temporary "I'm unhappy with my current parish, I want to experiment" phase.
Well trust me, if my wife is in agreement with me on converting and we tell our pastors and friends in leadership that we are becoming Orthodox, I'm not expecting they'll be happy for us. At that point turning back won't be an option.

A few years ago a friend of mine who was a worship leader at a Baptist Church announced that he and his wife were becoming Catholic. This was after taking a class in Church History that was part of some courses he was taking. I think I'm the only person who still talks to them.

I understand that if I convert I'm voiding years of my Bapticostal Christian experience.

I hope you don't mind if I reminisce a bit... the place I came from is perhaps not dissimilar to yours. I was one of the young people that was "on fire" for God, and, with the help of some other friends, brought a number of people into the local church I was attending. There was a middle-aged fellow at the Church that single-handedly brought probably a dozen people into the Church. He was a "soul winner". The work that my friends and I did was a bit more modest, we collectively brought maybe 6-8 people into our little church. For a place that had a Sunday worship attendance of 80-100, that's a nice increase. I eventually decided to go to our demonination's college as a Bible Studies major. It only took a year there to realise that Protestantism wasn't where I was supposed to be.

Eventually I stumbled on Orthodoxy. I informed my Protestant pastor that I was exploring Orthodoxy, and that whatever might happen I couldn't be a Protestant (at least one who believed in scripture alone, faith alone, etc.).  It's interesting that you say that turning back wouldn't be an option, because my pastor said the opposite: that I'd come back to his Church. Admittedly, I was a young fool "on fire" for God, while the Orthodox Church in town seemingly had one leg in the grave. Nonetheless, I pursued Orthodoxy.

The reaction of that I got from people was mixed. None of my friends turned their backs on me, and I have remained friends with a number of them (though because of distances between us, we stay in contact mostly through email). Only one friend was hostile, and only at first. He was angry because I had essentially led him into this Protestant Church, and then all of a sudden decided that I was leaving it. He felt betrayed. I don't think he understood why I left, and I probably didn't explain myself well. I probably couldn't at the time. We didn't have contact for a while. Then a couple years ago I stumbled on his band's myspace page, and the friendship was rekindled (we had been in a garage band together back in high school). It's interesting how things work out.

It sounds like you'd have a tougher path to walk than I did, though. In a way I can understand the position of such people, if they really think that Catholicism/Orthodoxy is dead traditions of men and all that, I can see why they would worry for you. I must say, though, that the Church I was part of actually thought Catholicism was an essential part of the work of Satan, though, and like I said, most of my friends stuck with me, so there's always hope.

Regarding voiding years of experience... I think I understand what you're saying, and I'd have to say maybe so, and maybe not. Yes, according to the Orthodox Church there is a difference between being Orthodox and not being Orthodox. However, that doesn't mean that all of your experiences prior to becoming Orthodox are worthless. Indeed, an Orthodox Christian might very well argue that if you didn't have a certain amount of grace-filled experience, you wouldn't consider Orthodoxy to begin with. This is somewhat triumphalistic, I admit, but perhaps worth considering. In any event, I wish you well, wherever God leads you.

Offline Ortho_cat

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Re: Convertitis
« Reply #47 on: December 24, 2009, 08:13:24 AM »


Regarding voiding years of experience... I think I understand what you're saying, and I'd have to say maybe so, and maybe not. Yes, according to the Orthodox Church there is a difference between being Orthodox and not being Orthodox. However, that doesn't mean that all of your experiences prior to becoming Orthodox are worthless. Indeed, an Orthodox Christian might very well argue that if you didn't have a certain amount of grace-filled experience, you wouldn't consider Orthodoxy to begin with. This is somewhat triumphalistic, I admit, but perhaps worth considering. In any event, I wish you well, wherever God leads you.

"No one can come to Me unless the Father who sent Me draws him..."

Offline Ortho_cat

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Re: What is Convertitis?
« Reply #48 on: December 24, 2009, 08:22:01 AM »


How did we get from the Ethiopian eunuch being baptized almost immediately to having to wait a year?

I can understand waiting till the newbie understands what's going on and what the church believes but a whole year? One of the reasons we are looking at converting is because of the Eucharist. We barely ever have communion at our current church and when we do it's of course symbolic.



Things were certainly different back then.  The Word was purely taught and proclaimed from the apostles mouths. Today, we have alot of competing Christian camps that have influenced and confused Christianity in general a great deal. For me at least, it takes a year to get rid of all my misconceptions and protestant baggage.  Of course, for soemone that is an atheist having no background in Christianity, who happens to stumble upon the OC and wants to convert, I can't really see why this wouldn't be considered like the Ethiopian Eunuch, because that person hasn't been distorted by the other sects of Christianity, and the OC "teaches the faith once delivered by the apostles". It certainly takes out the spontaneity of the conversion experience, that's for sure. What effects this has on the believer in the long term, i'm not sure...
« Last Edit: December 24, 2009, 08:23:04 AM by Ortho_cat »

Offline Ortho_cat

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Re: Convertitis
« Reply #49 on: December 24, 2009, 08:38:18 AM »


Admittedly, I was a young fool "on fire" for God, while the Orthodox Church in town seemingly had one leg in the grave. Nonetheless, I pursued Orthodoxy.


It is especially difficult when coming from a large protestant church that is teeming with young people your own age who also seem to be "on fire" for God (many of whom may be your friends), and then going to a small Orthodox Church where you know no one, and the large majority of the parish is elderly and of foreign descent.