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Author Topic: 2010 Orthodox Constructions of the West  (Read 746 times) Average Rating: 0
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Jetavan
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« on: December 05, 2009, 08:24:00 AM »

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In preparation for the publication of Orthodox Readings of Augustine (St. Vladimir’s Seminary Press, 2008), the co-founding directors of the Orthodox Christian Studies Program were struck by ways in which Orthodox authors, especially in the twentieth century, had created artificial categories of “East” and “West” and then used that distinction as a basis for self-definition.  The history of Orthodox Christianity is typically narrated by Orthodox and non-Orthodox alike as developing in the ‘East’, which is geographically ambiguous, but usually refers to the region in Europe east of present-day Croatia, Hungary and Poland.  In contemporary Orthodoxy, ‘West’ refers not simply to a geographical location, but to a form of civilization that was shaped and influenced by Latin Christendom, which includes both Roman Catholicism and Protestantism.  The “West,” thus, represents a cluster of theological, cultural and political ideas against which Orthodox self-identify.  In other words, Orthodox self-identification often engages in a distorted apophaticism:  Orthodoxy is what the “West” is not.

Given that much of the Orthodox world has until recently suffered oppression from the Ottomans and the Communists, one can read the creation of the “East-West” binary as a post-colonial search for an authentic Orthodox identity in the wake of such  domination.  After centuries of repression, it is not surprising that the Orthodox recovery of identity would take the form of opposition to that which is seemingly the religious, cultural and political “Other.”  The question that the conference will attempt to answer is whether such a construction has as much to do with Orthodox identify formation vis-à-vis the West as it does with genuine differences.  By creating this opposition to the “West,” do Orthodox communities not only misunderstand what Western Christians believe but, even more egregiously, have they come to believe certain things about their own tradition and teachings that are historically untrue?   The importance of addressing these questions is not simply limited to the theological realm.  There is evidence of anti-democracy and anti-human rights rhetoric coming from traditional Orthodox countries that have recently been liberated from communism, and this rhetoric often associates liberal forms of democracy and the notion of human rights in general as “Western” and, therefore, not Orthodox.  In other words, the self-identification vis-à-vis the “West” is affecting the cultural and political debates in the traditional Orthodox countries in Eastern Europe.  Insofar as this conference addresses the broader theme of identity formation, its impact is potentially far-reaching, as it hopes to influence the production of theological, cultural and political ideas within contemporary Orthodoxy.

The purpose of this conference is to explore how these artificial binaries were first created and, by exposing them, make possible a more authentic recovery of the rich Orthodox tradition that is unfettered by self-definition vis-à-vis the proximate other.  It is also expected that the deconstruction of false caricatures of West will impact the discussion on culture and politics throughout the Orthodox world, as well as assist in moving the ecumenical conversation forward.
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2009, 08:32:07 AM »

Well, ok, that sounds like it could be informative. However, I hope they will touch upon the fact that it was not unknown for Eastern Christians, even before the Muslim/Communist oppressions, to speak ill of "the west".
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SolEX01
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« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2009, 01:29:15 PM »

Let's not forget that a very prominent Hierarch (e.g. the EP) recently received an Honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Fordham.

Quote from: Fordham site
By creating this opposition to the “West,” do Orthodox communities not only misunderstand what Western Christians believe but, even more egregiously, have they come to believe certain things about their own tradition and teachings that are historically untrue?   The importance of addressing these questions is not simply limited to the theological realm.  There is evidence of anti-democracy and anti-human rights rhetoric coming from traditional Orthodox countries that have recently been liberated from communism,

Sounds to me like a shot across the bow of the MP and Russia.
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