Author Topic: Salt  (Read 1013 times)

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Offline Keble

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Salt
« on: November 23, 2009, 06:29:44 PM »
Could someone discuss the liturgical use of salt and point to some references on the subject?

Offline mike

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Re: Salt
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2009, 06:54:43 PM »
In Slavic tradition salt is blessed before Pascha and during Priests' visitations after Epiphany. Honourable guest (e.g. Bishops) are also welcomed with bread and salt.

I do not now if salt has any real liturgical use.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2009, 06:57:11 PM by mike »

Offline Papist

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Re: Salt
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2009, 07:23:52 PM »
Hey, we use blessed salt too.  :)
« Last Edit: November 23, 2009, 07:24:04 PM by Papist »
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Offline Shanghaiski

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Re: Salt
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2009, 04:07:15 AM »
As far as I know, the practice of blessing salt liturgically and using it in baptisms and putting it in holy water was prevalent in the Orthodox West before the schism in the mid 11th century, but I don't have a solid source for this, and I'm not sure how it came to be done. Of course, one should remember, historically and throughout the ancient Orthodox world, there were a number of different practices which people in local communities thought should be universal. St. Monica, for example, was shocked that the Milanese Christians did not pour milk and honey on the graves of the martyrs, as they did in Carthage.
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Offline ialmisry

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Re: Salt
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2009, 11:38:11 AM »
Hey, we use blessed salt too.  :)
You're the only ones who do:
Quote
Its use in the Church belongs exclusively to the Roman Rite. The Ritual knows two kinds of salt for liturgical purposes, the baptismal salt and the blessed salt.
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13403b.htm

I"ve seen some EO-Vatican polemics over its use, which would seem to indicate we don't.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2009, 11:38:55 AM by ialmisry »
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Offline Shanghaiski

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Re: Salt
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2009, 09:16:17 PM »
If salt was blessed liturgically in the West before the schism in the mid 11th century, then it is an Orthodox custom. I do not put much stock in the polemics of the time period. It was not an era known for understanding, to put it mildly.
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Offline witega

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Re: Salt
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2009, 09:28:01 PM »
If salt was blessed liturgically in the West before the schism in the mid 11th century, then it is an Orthodox custom. I do not put much stock in the polemics of the time period. It was not an era known for understanding, to put it mildly.

The West was not perfectly Orthodox one day, then woke up the next day un-Orthodox. The drift away from Orthodoxy started considerably earlier, though it only reached a crisis point in 1054. Just because something was present in the West before the actual schism doesn't make it Orthodox. It has to be considered both in terms of when it originated and how it relates to the entire flow of Western practice and its tending away from the Apostolic Foundation.

(which isn't to say Western use of salt in particular is problematic. I'm not familiar enough with the specific custom or its history to comment.)
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Offline Shanghaiski

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Re: Salt
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2009, 10:42:01 PM »
Well, I'm not a great fan of the theological drift hypothesis. The 11th century was, as proved by history, a dynamic time of extreme change from a very militant party of non-Roman, Latin reformers who took over the Western Church in the mid-11th century and transformed it into that which it had never been before by 1100. Sure, there were some precursors to this, most obviously along the lines of papal supremacy. However, in general, I think the practices of the Western Church prior to that critical time are without question Orthodox, since they were fully Orthodox. If one goes to far, one sets up a sort of double standard. Why would the East be immune to such heavy scrutiny just because it has remained Orthodox? For the first 1000, it was a hotbed of heresy.
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If you spend long enough on this forum, you'll come away with all sorts of weird, untrue ideas of Orthodox Christianity.
Quote from: orthonorm
I would suggest most persons in general avoid any question beginning with why.