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Author Topic: Patristic Quotes of Deuterocanonical Texts  (Read 6471 times) Average Rating: 5
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Justin Kissel
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« on: November 17, 2009, 06:39:34 PM »

Back when I had a website I did some research in the Church Fathers about their usage of the various apocryphal or deuterocanonical books. Due to my activity on a recent thread concerning Tobit, I was reminded that I still had these quotes/references on my hard drive, and I thought that perhaps some people would find them interesting or useful. I can't guarantee that every quote/reference is accurate, and I haven't really looked at these for probably 6 years or more, but if you want you can always check them on sites like CCEL or New Advent. Because of the length of the information, I've divided it up into seperate posts.

Baruch

Bar. 3:1-2
Rightly, then, is it said: "Who shall entreat for him?" It implies that it must be such an one as Moses to offer himself for those who sin, or such as Jeremiah, who, though the Lord said to him, "Pray not thou for this people," (Jer. 7:16) and yet he prayed and obtained their forgiveness. For at the intercession of the prophet, and the entreaty of so great a seer, the Lord was moved and said to Jerusalem, which had meanwhile repented for its sins, and had said: "O Almighty Lord God of Israel, the soul in anguish, and the troubled spirit crieth unto Thee, hear, O Lord, and have mercy." (Bar. 3:1-2) And the Lord bids them lay aside the garments of mourning, and to cease the groanings of repentance, saying: "Put off, O Jerusalem, the garment of thy mourning and affliction. and clothe thyself in beauty, the glory which God hath given thee for ever." (Bar. 5:1) - St. Ambrose, Two Books Concerning Repentance, 1, 9

Bar. 3:3
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 6

Bar. 3:9
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 4

Bar. 3:11
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, 5: Conference of Abbot Serapion, 12
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, 7: Conference of Abbot Serenus, 5

Bar. 3:12
St. Athanasius, Defense of the Nicene Definition, 3
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 6
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 18

Bar. 3:13
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 4

Bar. 3:16-19
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 3

Bar. 3:35-38
St. Ireneaus, Against Heresies 2, 24
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 1, 3
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 2, 9
St. John Cassian, On the Incarnation of the Lord (Against Nestorius), 4, 9
St. John Cassian, On the Incarnation of the Lord (Against Nestorius), 4, 13
St. John Cassian, On the Incarnation of the Lord (Against Nestorius), 5, 5
St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 4, 42
St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 5, 39
St. John of Damascus, Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 1, 13
St. John of Damascus, Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 3, 4
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 11, 15
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 30, 13
St. Gregory the Theologian, Epistle 102: The Second Letter to Cledonius (Against Apollinarius)
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 2, 1
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 5, 3
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 6, 1
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 6, 4
St. Athanasius, Four Discourse Against the Arians, 13
St. Athanasius, Four Discourse Against the Arians, 19
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Matthew
St. John Chrysostom, Commentary on Matt. 26:9

Bar. 4-5
St. Ireneaus, Against Heresies, 5, 35

Bar. 4:4
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 4

Bar. 4:20-22
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 4

Bar. 5:1
Rightly, then, is it said: "Who shall entreat for him?" It implies that it must be such an one as Moses to offer himself for those who sin, or such as Jeremiah, who, though the Lord said to him, "Pray not thou for this people," (Jer. 7:16) and yet he prayed and obtained their forgiveness. For at the intercession of the prophet, and the entreaty of so great a seer, the Lord was moved and said to Jerusalem, which had meanwhile repented for its sins, and had said: "O Almighty Lord God of Israel, the soul in anguish, and the troubled spirit crieth unto Thee, hear, O Lord, and have mercy." (Bar. 3:1-2) And the Lord bids them lay aside the garments of mourning, and to cease the groanings of repentance, saying: "Put off, O Jerusalem, the garment of thy mourning and affliction. and clothe thyself in beauty, the glory which God hath given thee for ever." (Bar. 5:1) - St. Ambrose, Two Books Concerning Repentance, 1, 9

Bar. 5:5
Bl. Jerome, Letter 77:To Oceanus, 5

Bar. 6
Bl. Jerome, Letter 31:To Eustochium, 2
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2009, 06:40:35 PM »

Bel and the Dragon

General References
St. Ireneaus, Against Heresies, 4, 5
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 1, 21

Bel. 27
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 24 on First Corinthians
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 38 on First Corinthians

Bel. 33-39
Bl. Jerome, Letter 22:To Eustochium, 9

Bel. 33
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 18, 30

Bel. 36
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 19 on Acts

Bel. 38
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Philemon

Bel. 39
But this is not the only kind of fortitude which is worthy of note. We consider their fortitude glorious, who, with greatness of mind, "through faith stopped the mouth of lions, quenched the violence of fire, escaped the edge of the sword, out of weakness were made strong." (Heb. 11:33-34) They did not gain a victory in common with many, surrounded with comrades, and aided by the legions, but won their triumph alone over their treacherous foes by the mere courage of their own souls. How unconquerable was Daniel, who feared not the lions raging round about him. The beasts roared, whilst he was eating. (Bel. 5:39) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 35

What shall I say of the youth Daniel, who was so wise that, when in the midst of the lions enraged with hunger, he was by no means overcome with terror at the fierceness of the beasts. So free from fear was he, that he could eat, and was not afraid he might by his example excite the animals to feed on him. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 4

St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 11
St. Basil, Letter 42, 5: To Chilo

Bel. 44
It is clear also, according to the sacred Scriptures, which are the older, that wisdom cannot exist without justice, for where one of these two is, there the other must be also. With what wisdom did Daniel expose the lie in the false accusation brought against him by his thorough examination, so that those false informers had no answer ready to hand! - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 9
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« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2009, 06:41:07 PM »

Judith

General References
See! Judith presents herself to thee as worthy of admiration. She approaches Holophernes, a man feared by the people, and surrounded by the victorious troops of the Assyrians. At first she makes an impression on him by the grace of her form and the beauty of her countenance. Then she entraps him by the refinement of her speech. Her first triumph was that she returned from the tent of the enemy with her purity unspotted. (Judith 12:20) Her second, that she gained a victory over a man, and put to flight the people by her counsel. The Persians were terrified at her daring. (Judith 15) And so what is admired in the case of those two Pythagoreans deserves also in her case our admiration, for she trembled not at the danger of death, nor even at the danger her modesty was in, which is a matter of greater concern to good women. She feared not the blow of one scoundrel, nor even the weapons of a whole army. She, a woman, stood between the lines of the combatants--right amidst victorious arms--heedless of death. As one looks at her overwhelming danger, one would say she went out to die; as one looks at her faith, one says she went but out to fight. Judith then followed the call of virtue, and as she follows that, she wins great benefits. It was virtuous to prevent the people of the Lord from giving themselves up to the heathen; to prevent them from betraying their native rites and mysteries, or from yielding up their consecrated virgins, their venerable widows, and modest matrons to barbarian impurity, or from ending the siege by a surrender. It was virtuous for her to be willing to encounter danger on behalf of all, so as to deliver all from danger.How great must have been the power of her virtue, that she, a woman, should claim to give counsel on the chiefest matters and not leave it in the hands of the leaders of the people! How great, again, the power of her virtue to reckon for certain upon God to help her! How great her grace to find His help! - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 13
 
For holy Judith by seemly disregard for her own safety put an end to the dangers of the siege, and by her own virtue won what was useful to all in common. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 14

Wherefore I exhort women to make this their employment, and to give fitting counsel. For as they have great power for good, so have they also for evil. A women destroyed Absalom, a woman destroyed Amnon, a woman was like to have destroyed Job, a woman rescued Nabal from the slaughter. Women have preserved whole nations; for Deborah and Judith exhibited successes worthy of men; so also do ten thousand other women. Wherefore Paul saith, "For what knowest thou, O wife, whether thou shall save thy husband?" (1 Cor. 7:16) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 61 on John

Sulpitius Severus, The Sacred History, 2, 12
Sulpitius Severus, The Sacred History, 2, 14
Sulpitius Severus, The Sacred History, 2, 16
St. Amborse, Treatise Concerning Widows, 7
St. Athanasius, Letter 39, 7
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4, 19

Judith 5:6
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 45, 15

Judith 8
St. Amborse, Treatise Concerning Widows, 7
St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 10
St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 55
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2, 7

Judith 9
St. Athanasius, Letter 4, 2

Judith 9:5-6
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 8

Judith 10
How can one be a virgin who cherishes a harlot? How can one be a virgin who loves adulterers? How a virgin if she seeks for a lover? It is preferable to have a virgin mind than a virgin body. Each is good if each be possible; if it be not possible, let me be chaste, not to man but to God. Rahab, too, was a harlot, but after she believed in God, she found salvation. (Jos. 2:9) And Judith adorned herself that she might please an adulterer, but because she did this for religion and not for love, no one considered her an adulteress. (Judith 10) This instance turned out well. For if she who entrusted herself to religion both preserved her chastity and her country, perhaps I, by preserving my religion, shall also preserve my chastity. But if Judith had preferred her chastity to her religion, when her country had been lost, she would also have lost her chastity. - St. Ambrose, Three Books Concerning Virginity, 2, 4

St. Amborse, Treatise Concerning Widows, 7

Judith 12:20
See! Judith presents herself to thee as worthy of admiration. She approaches Holophernes, a man feared by the people, and surrounded by the victorious troops of the Assyrians. At first she makes an impression on him by the grace of her form and the beauty of her countenance. Then she entraps him by the refinement of her speech. Her first triumph was that she returned from the tent of the enemy with her purity unspotted. (Judith 12:20) Her second, that she gained a victory over a man, and put to flight the people by her counsel. The Persians were terrified at her daring. (Judith 15) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 13

Judith 13
And why should I speak of men? Judith, in no way moved by the luxurious banquet of Holophernes, carried off the triumph of which men's arms despaired, solely in right of her temperance; delivered her country from occupation and slew the leader of the expedition with her own hands. (Jud. 13:16) A clear proof both that his luxury had enervated that warrior, terrible to the nations, and that temperance made this woman stronger than men. In this case it was not in her sex that nature was surpassed, but she overcame by her diet. - St. Ambrose, Epistle 63: To Limeneus

Death came through Eve, but life has come through Mary. And thus the gift of virginity has been bestowed most richly upon women, seeing that it has had its beginning from a woman. As soon as the Son of God set foot upon the earth, He formed for Himself a new household there; that, as He was adored by angels in heaven, angels might serve Him also on earth. Then chaste Judith once more cut off the head of Holofernes. (Judith 13) - Bl. Jerome, Letter 22:To Eustochium, 21

You have widows like yourself worthy to be your models, Judith renowned in Hebrew story and Anna the daughter of Phanuel famous in the gospel. Both these lived day and night in the temple and preserved the treasure of their chastity by prayer and by fasting. One was a type of the Church which cuts off the head of the devil (Judith 13) and the other first received in her arms the saviour of the world and had revealed to her the holy mysteries which were to come. (Luke 2:36-38) - Bl. Jerome, Letter 79:To Salvina, 10

Bl. Jerome, Letter 54:To Furia, 16
St. Athanasius, Letter 4, 2

Judith 15
See! Judith presents herself to thee as worthy of admiration. She approaches Holophernes, a man feared by the people, and surrounded by the victorious troops of the Assyrians. At first she makes an impression on him by the grace of her form and the beauty of her countenance. Then she entraps him by the refinement of her speech. Her first triumph was that she returned from the tent of the enemy with her purity unspotted. (Judith 12:20) Her second, that she gained a victory over a man, and put to flight the people by her counsel. The Persians were terrified at her daring. (Judith 15) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 13

St. Athanasius, Letter 4, 2
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2009, 06:41:37 PM »

1-3 Maccabees

1 Macc. 2
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 40
St. Ambrose, Letter 40:To Theodosius

1 Macc. 4:54
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 19 on Romans

1 Macc. 6:43
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 40

1 Macc. 9:8
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 41

1 Macc. 11:68
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 41

2 Macc. 1
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 17

2 Macc. 2
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 17
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 18

2 Macc. 3
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 29

2 Macc. 4
St. Ambrose, Letter 42: To Eugenius

2 Macc. 5:26-27
Aphraates, Demonstration 5: Of Wars

2 Macc. 6:2-31
 St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 8: The Second Conference of Abbot Serenus, 4
Aphraates, Demonstration 5: Of Wars
Aphraates, Demonstration 21: Of Persecution

2 Macc. 7
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 41
St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 4, 16
St. Basil, Letter 6: To the Wife of Nektarius
Aphraates, Demonstration 5: Of Wars
Aphraates, Demonstration 21: Of Persecution
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 43, 74
Bl. Jerome, Letter 7:To Chromatius, Jovinus, and Eusebius, 5

2 Macc. 9:5-28
Aphraates, Demonstration 5: Of Wars

2 Macc. 14:33
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 19 on Romans

3 Macc. 2:14
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On the Soul and the Resurrection
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2009, 06:42:06 PM »

Sirach 1-4

Sir. 1:1
Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 1, 4

Sir. 1:1-2
Let us not then be disturbed, neither dismayed, when trials befall us. For if the gold refiner sees how long he ought to leave the piece of gold in the furnace, and when he ought to draw it out, and does not allow it to remain in the fire until it is destroyed and burnt up: much more does God understand this, and when He sees that we have become more pure, He releases us from our trials so that we may not be overthrown and cast down by the multiplication of our evils. Let us then not be repining, or faint-hearted, when some unexpected thing befalls us; but let us suffer Him who knows these things accurately, to prove our hearts by fire as long as He pleases: for He does this for a useful purpose and with a view to the profit of those who are tried. On this account a certain wise man admonishes us saying "My Son, if thou come to serve the Lord prepare thy soul for temptation, set thy heart aright and constantly endure and make not haste in time of trouble;" (Sir. 1:1-2) "yield to Him" he says, "in all things," for He knoweth exactly when it is right to pluck us out of the furnace of evil. We ought therefore everywhere to yield to Him and always to give thanks, and to bear all things contentedly, whether He bestows benefits or chastisement upon us, for this also is a species of benefit. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily on the Paralytic Let Down Through the Roof

Sir. 1:2
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 32, 8

Sir. 1:9-10
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 22

Sir. 1:18
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8

Sir. 1:22
For the passion of wrath is fierce, fiercer than any flame; and so we need much haste to prevent the flame, and not allow it to blaze up high, for so this disease becomes a cause of many evils. It has overturned whole houses, it has dissolved old companionships, and has worked tragedies not to be remedied in a short moment of time. "For," saith one, "the sway of his fury shall be his destruction." ( Sir. 1:22) Let us not then leave such a wild beast unbridled, but put upon him a muzzle in all ways strong, the fear of the judgment to come. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on John

Learn we then, from what hath been said, His kindness and gentleness; "Learn of Me, for I am meek and lowly of heart" (Matt. 11:29); and let us cast away all bitterness. If any exalt himself against us, let us be humble; if any be bold, let us wait upon him; if any bite and devour us with mocks and jests, let us not be overcome; lest in defending ourselves we destroy ourselves. For wrath is a wild beast, a wild beast keen and angry. Let us then repeat to ourselves soothing charms drawn from the holy Scripture, and say, "Thou art earth and ashes." "Why is earth and ashes proud?" (Sir. 10:9), and, "The sway of his fury shall be his destruction" (Sir 1:22): and, "The wrathful man is not comely" (Prov. 11:25); for there is nothing more shameful, nothing uglier than a visage inflamed with anger. As when you stir up mud there is an ill savor, so when a soul is disturbed by passion there is great indecency and unpleasantness. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 48 on John

The other affections which are within us, are in some cases useful. For instance, Anger is often useful. For (saith he) "unjust wrath shall not be innocent" (Sir. 1:22): wherefore it is possible for one to be justly in wrath. And again, "He that is angry with his brother without cause, shall be in danger of hell." (Matt. 5:22) Again for instance, emulation, desire, [are useful]: the one when it hath reference to the procreation of children, the other when he directs his emulation to excellent things. As Paul also saith, "It is good to be zealously affected always in a good thing" (Gal. iv. 18) and, "Covet earnestly the best gifts." (1 Cor. 12:31) Both therefore are useful: but an insolent spirit is in no case good, but is always unprofitable and hurtful. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Hebrews

Because lust is a mockery and a lie: wherefore the prophet says, "My loins are filled with mockings." (Ps. 38:7) The thing is not pleasure, but a shadow of pleasure. "Having your loins," he says, "girt about with truth"; that is, with true pleasure, with temperance, with orderly behavior. For this cause he gives this advice, knowing the unreasonableness of sin, and wishing that all our members should be hedged round; for "unjust anger." it is said, "shall not be guiltless." (Sir. 1:22) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 5 on Hebrews

Then what would we have to be brought about? for one must not merely find fault. I beseech and entreat you not to think it enough to have invaded the Church, but that ye also withdraw hence, having taken somewhat, some medicine, for the curing of your own maladies: and, if not from us, at any rate from the Scriptures, ye have the remedies suitable for each. For instance, is any passionate? Let him attend to the Scripture-readings, and he will of a surety find such either in history or exhortation. In exhortation, when it is said, "The sway of his fury is his destruction" (Sir. 1:22); and, "A passionate man is not seemly" (Prov. 1:25) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 29 on Acts

Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8

Sir. 1:27
Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 2, 15

Sir. 2:1
Wherefore, as Scripture says, "when you go forth to serve the Lord stand in the fear of the Lord, and prepare your mind" (Sir. 2:1) not for repose or carelessness or delights, but for temptations and troubles. For "through much tribulation we must enter into the kingdom of God." For "strait is the gate and narrow is the way which leadeth unto life, and few there be which find it." (Acts 14:22) - St. Vincent of Lerins, The Commonitory, 38

Others may praise you if they will, and celebrate your victories over the devil. They may eulogize you for the smiling face with which you bore the loss of your daughters, or for the resolution with which, forty days after they fell asleep, you exchanged your mourning for a white robe to attend the dedication of a martyr's bones; unconcerned for a bereavement which was the concern of the whole city, and anxious only to share in a martyr's triumph. Nay, say they, when you bore your wife to burial, it was not as one dead but as one setting forth on a journey. But I shall not deceive you with flattering words or take the ground from under your feet with slippery praises. Rather will I say what it is good for you to hear: "My son, if thou come to serve the Lord, prepare thy soul for temptation," (Sir. 2:1) and "when thou shalt have done all those things which are commanded thee, say, I am an unprofitable servant; I have done that which was my duty to do." (Luke 17:10) - Bl. Jerome, Letter 118: To Julian, 4

As in good works it is God who brings them to perfection, for it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that pitieth and gives us help that we may be able to reach the goal: so in things wicked and sinful, the seeds within us give the impulse, and these are brought to maturity by the devil. When he sees that we are building upon the foundation of Christ, hay, wood, stubble, then he applies the match. Let us then build gold, silver, costly stones, and he will not venture to tempt us: although even thus there is not sure and safe possession. For the lion lurks in ambush to slay the innocent. (Sir. 27:5) "Potters' vessels are proved by the furnace, and just men by the trial of tribulation." And in another place it is written:  "My son, when thou comest to serve the Lord, prepare thyself for temptation." (Sir. 2:1) Again, the same James says: "Be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only. For if any one is a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his natural face in a mirror: for he beholdeth himself, and goeth away, and straightway forgetteth what manner of man he was." (James 1:22) - Bl. Jerome, Against Jovinianus, 2, 3

For there are no works of power, dearly-beloved, without the trials of temptations, there is no faith without proof, no contest without a foe, no victory without conflict. This life of ours is in the midst of snares, in the midst of battles; if we do not wish to be deceived, we must watch:  if we want to overcome, we must fight.  And therefore the most wise Solomon says, "My son in approaching the service of God prepare thy soul for temptation." (Sir. 2:1)  For He being a man full of the wisdom of God, and knowing that the pursuit of religion involves laborious struggles, foreseeing too the danger of the fight, forewarned the intending combatant; lest haply, if the tempter came upon him in his ignorance, he might find him unready and wound him unawares. - St. Leo the Great, Sermon 39, 3

Sir. 2:2
Let us then not be distressed at the evils that happen to us. This is sobriety of mind. "In the season of temptation," he says, "make not haste." (Sir. 2:2) Many have their several griefs at home, and we share in each other's sorrows, though not in their sources. For one is unhappy on account of his wife, another on account of his child, or his domestic, another of his friend, another of his enemy, another of his neighbor, another from some loss. And various are the causes of sorrow, so that we can find no one free from trouble and unhappiness of some kind or other, but some have greater sorrows and some less. Let us not therefore be impatient, nor think ourselves only to be unhappy. For there is no such thing in this mortal life as being exempt from sorrow. If not to-day, yet to-morrow; if not to-morrow, yet some later day trouble comes. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Second Timothy

Sir. 2:3
But if it were necessary to add a ninth reason, we might say, that this tribulation maketh those who are troubled more approved; "For tribulation worketh patience; and patience, probation; and probation, hope; and hope maketh not ashamed." (Sir. 2:3) Do you see that the probation, which comes of tribulation, fixes in us the hope of the good things to come, and that the abiding in trials causes us to have a good hope of the future? So that I did not say rashly, that these tribulations themselves mark out to us hopes of a resurrection, and make those who are tried the better; for, he saith, "as gold is tried in a furnace, so an acceptable man in the furnace of humiliation." - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 1

Sir. 2:4-5
But suppose a man hath fallen into disease? Well, he hath heard another admonishing, and saying, "In disease and poverty trust thou in Him; for as gold is tried in the fire, so are acceptable men in the furnace of humiliation." (Sir. 2:4-5_ Since, therefore, neither death, nor loss of money, nor bodily disease, nor dishonour, nor reproach, nor any other thing of that nature, will be able to grieve him, but makes him even the more joyful, what foundation for sadness will he have at any time? - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 18 

Sir. 2:4
What then? Are we to give thanks for everything that befalls us? Yes; be it even disease, be it even penury. For if a certain wise man gave this advice in the Old Testament, and said, "Whatsoever is brought upon thee take cheerfully, and be patient when thou art changed to a low estate" (Sir. 2:4); much more ought this to be the case in the New. Yes, even though thou know not the word, give thanks. For this is thanksgiving. But if thou give thanks when thou art in comfort and in affluence, in success and in prosperity, there is nothing great, nothing wonderful in that. What is required is, for a man to give thanks when he is in afflictions, in anguish, in discouragements. Utter no word in preference to this, "Lord, I thank thee." - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 19 on Ephesians

Sir. 2:5
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 7: The First Conference of Abbot Serenus, 25

Sir. 2:10
For that he may persuade us not to leave the whole matter to the prayers made for us, and contribute nothing ourselves, behold how he lays down his own part, which is Hope, the source of all good, as the Prophet says. "Let thy mercy, O Lord, be upon us, according as we have hoped in Thee." (Ps. 33:22) And as it is written in another place, "Look to the generations of old and see, did any one hope in the Lord, and was made ashamed?" (Sir. 2:10) And again, this same blessed one says, "Hope putteth not to shame." (Rom. 5:5) This is Paul's hope, the hoping that I shall nowhere be put to shame. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 3 on Philippians

But if you long for the security which you formerly enjoyed owing to your husband, and the protection of your property, and immunity from the designs of any of those persons who trample upon the misfortunes of others "Cast thy care upon the Lord and He will nourish thee." (Ps. 55:23) "For look," it is said, "to past generations and see, who ever placed his hope on the Lord and was put to shame, or who ever called upon Him, and was neglected, or who ever remained constant to His commandments and was forsaken?" (Sir. 2:10) For He who has alleviated this intolerable calamity, and placed you even now in a state of tranquillity will also avert impending evils; for that you will never receive another blow more severe than this you would yourself admit. - St. John Chrysostom, Letter to a Young Widow

Sir. 2:11
For tell me, wherefore fearest thou poverty? wherefore tremblest thou? is it not by reason of hunger? is it not for thirst? is it not for cold? Is it not indeed for these things? There is not, there is not any one who is ever destitute in these things! "For look at the generations of old, and see, did ever any one trust in the Lord, and was forsaken? or did any one hope in Him, and was made ashamed?" (Sir. 2:11) And again, "Behold the birds of the heaven, that they sow not, neither do they reap, nor gather into barns; and your heavenly Father feedeth them." (Matt. 6:26) No one can readily point us out any one who has perished by hunger and cold. Wherefore then dost thou tremble at poverty? - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Philippians

Sir. 2:12
What is "let us draw near with a true heart"? (Heb. 10:22) That is, without hypocrisy; for "woe be to a fearful heart, and faint hands" (Sir. 2:12): let there be (he means) no falsehood among us; let us not say one thing and think another; for  this is falsehood; neither let us be fainthearted, for this is not [a mark] of a "true heart." Faintheartedness comes from not believing. But how shall this be? If we fully assure ourselves through faith. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 19 on Hebrews

Sir. 2:18
Next he adds testimony, saying,  "It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands I of the Living God." (Heb. 10:30-31) "For" it is written: "Vengeance [belongeth] unto Me, I will recompense, saith the Lord. And again, The Lord shall judge His people." "Let us fall," it is said, "into the hands of the Lord, and not into the hands of men." (Sir. 2:18) But if ye repent not, ye shall "fill into the hands of" God: that is fearful: it is nothing, to "fall into the hands of men." When, he means, we see any man punished here, let us not be terrified at the things present, but shudder at the things to come. "For according to His mercy, so is His wrath." And, "His indignation will rest upon sinners." (Sir. 5:6) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 20 on Hebrews

Sir. 2:27
For when the fear of death is urgent, like a fire consuming all things besides, it obliges the soul to philosophize, and to take thought for futurity. The desire of wealth, the love of gain, and of bodily pleasures, no longer possesses it. These things passing away like clouds, leave the judging faculty clear, and grief entering in softens the hard heart. For nothing is so opposite to philosophy, as a life of pleasure; nor, on the other hand, is anything so favorable to philosophy as affliction. Consider what the covetous man will then be. For, "an hour of affliction," it is said, "maketh a man forget much pleasure." (Ecclus. ii. 27.) What will then be his state, when he considers those whom he has robbed, and injured, and defrauded, when he sees others reaping the fruits of his grasping, and himself going to pay the penalty? For it cannot, indeed it cannot be, that when fallen into sickness he should not reflect upon these things. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 5 on Second Timothy

Sir. 3:9
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 2, 116

Sir. 3:10
If a wise Son maketh a glad Father, (Prov. 10:1) how much more doth the honour of the Son become that of the Father!  And if you also accept this saying, My Son, glory not in the dishonour of thy Father, (Sir. 3:10) similarly the Father doth not glory in the Son's dishonour.  If you dishonour the Holy Ghost, the Son receiveth not your honour.  For though He be not of the Father in the same way as the Son, yet He is of the same Father.  Either honour the whole or dishonour the whole, so as to have a consistent mind.  I cannot accept your half piety.  I would have you altogether pious, but in the way that I desire.  Pardon my affection:  I am grieved even for those who hate me.  You were one of my members, even though you are now cut off:  perhaps you will again become a member; and therefore I speak kindly.  Thus much for the sake of the Eunuchs, that they may be chaste in respect of the Godhead. - St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 37, 18

Sir. 3:10-12
I beseech you, let us not speak ill of our teachers, nor call them to so strict an account, lest we bring evil upon ourselves. Let us examine ourselves, and we shall not speak ill of others. Let us reverence that day, on which he enlightened us. He who has a father, whatever faults he has, conceals them all. For it is said, "Glory not in the dishonor of thy father; for thy father's dishonor is no glory unto thee. And if his understanding fail, have patience with him." (Sir. 3:10-12.) And if this be said of our natural fathers, much more of our spiritual fathers. Reverence him, in that he every day ministers to thee, causes the Scriptures to be read, sets the house in order for thee, watches for thee, prays for thee, stands imploring God on thy behalf, offers supplications for thee, for thee is all his worship. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Second Timothy

Sir. 3:11
God doth not so; but saith Honour thy father and thy mother, which is the first commandment with promise; that it may be well with thee; and, He that curseth father or mother, let him die the death.  Similarly He gave honour to good and punishment to evil.  And, The blessing of a father strengtheneth the houses of children, but the curse of a mother uprooteth the foundations. (Sir. 3:11) See the equality of the legislation.  There is one Maker of man and woman; one debt is owed by children to both their parents. - St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 37, 6

For how can he exhort others not to spend their time on these superfluities, who cannot advise himself? But if he has sufficient for support, is he therefore doing wrong? Would you have him lead a vagabond life, and beg? Wouldest not thou too, his disciple, be put to shame? But if thy father in the flesh did this, thou wouldest think shame of the thing. If thy spiritual father be compelled so to do, wilt thou not veil thy head, and even think thou art sinking into the earth? It is written, "A father's dishonor is a reproach to the children." (Sir. 3:11) But what? Should he perish with famine? This were not like a pious man; for God willeth it not. But what do they straightway philosophize? It is written, say they, "Get you no gold, nor silver, nor brass in your purses, neither two coats, nor yet staves" (Matt. 10:9-10), whilst these men have three or four garments, and beds well spread. I am forced now to heave a bitter sigh, and, but that it had been indecorous, I had wept too! How so? Because we are such curious searchers into the motes of others, while we feel not the beams in our own eyes. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on Philippians

Sir. 3:21-23
For He hath not permitted all things to be unknown, lest thou shouldest say, that the things that exist are not of providence. He hath not permitted all things to be known to thee, lest the greatness of thy knowledge should excite thee to pride. Thus at least it was that the evil demon precipitated the first man headlong and by means of the hope of greater knowledge, deprived him of that he already possessed. Therefore also, a certain wise man exhorts, saying, "Seek not out the things that are too hard for thee; neither search the things that are too deep for thee. But what is commanded thee, think thereupon with reverence; for the greater part of His works are done in secret." (Sir. 3:21-23) And again; "More things are shewed unto thee than men understand." But this he speaks for the purpose of consoling the man who is sad and vexed, because he does not know all things; for even those things he observes, which thou art permitted to know, greatly surpass thine understanding; for thou couldest not have found them by thyself, but thou hast been taught them of God. Wherefore be content with the wealth given thee, and do not seek more; but for what thou hast received give thanks; and do not be angry on account of those things which thou hast not received. And, for what thou knowest, give glory, and do not stumble at those things of which thou art ignorant. For God hath made both alike profitably; and hath revealed some things, but hidden others, providing for thy safety. - St. John Chrysostom,  Homilies On the Statues, 12

Sir. 3:21-22
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 6, 4

Sir. 3:22
John feared to baptize the flesh of the Lord, John forbade Him, saying: "I have need to be baptized of Thee, and comest Thou to me?" (Matt. 3:4) And shall I bring Christ under my judgment? Moses excuses himself from the Priesthood, Peter is for avoiding the obedience demanded in the Ministry; and does Arius examine even the deep things of God? But Arius is not the Holy Spirit. Nay, it was said even to Arius and to all men: "Seek not that which is too deep for thee." (Sir. 3:22) - St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 5, 19

St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 11, 19

Sir. 3:29
Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 2, 15

Sir. 3:30
Our dear Pammachius also waters the holy ashes and the revered bones of Paulina, but it is with the balm of almsgiving. These are the confections and the perfumes with which he cherishes the dead embers of his wife knowing that it is written: "Water will quench a flaming fire; and alms maketh an atonement for sins." (Sir. 3:30) - Bl. Jerome, Letter 66: To Pammachius, 5

All the money that the Emperor's bounty gave him or that his badges of office procured him he laid out for the benefit of the poor. For he knew the commandment of the Lord: "If thou wilt be perfect go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and come and follow me." (Matt. 19:21) And because he could not literally fulfil these directions, having a wife and little children and a large household, he made to himself friends of the mammon of unrighteousness that they might receive him into everlasting habitations... It must not, however, be supposed that I praise Nebridius only for his liberality in alms-giving, although we are taught the great importance of this in the words: "water will quench a flaming fire; and alms maketh an atonement for sins." (Sir. 3:30) - Bl. Jerome, Letter 79: To Salvina, 4-5

Many married ladies make it a habit to confer gifts upon their own trumpeters, and while they are extremely profuse to a few, withhold all help from the many. From this fault Paula was altogether free. She gave her money to each according as each had need, not ministering to self-indulgence but relieving want. No poor person went away from her empty handed. And all this she was enabled to do not by the greatness of her wealth but by her careful management of it. She constantly had on her lips such phrases as these: "Blessed are the merciful for they shall obtain mercy:" (Matt. 5:7) and "water will quench a flaming fire; and alms maketh an atonement for sins;" (Sir. 3:30) and "make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness that...they may receive you into everlasting habitations;" (Luke 16:9) and "give alms...and behold all things are clean unto you;" (Luke 11:41) and Daniel's words to King Nebuchadnezzar in which he admonished him to redeem his sins by almsgiving. (Dan. 4:27) - Bl. Jerome, Letter 108: To Eustochium, 16

Let us reckon up exactly all the wicked deeds, which in time past we have dared, and let us earnestly strive to wipe them off in all kinds of ways...  Now to this end God hath opened to us many ways ...a continual accusation and remembrance of sins contributes not a little to lessen their magnitude. But there is another more prevailing way than this; to bear malice against none of those who have offended against us, to forgive their trespasses to all those who have trespassed against us. Will you learn a third? Hear Daniel, saying, "Redeem thy sins by almsdeeds, and thine iniquities by showing mercy to the poor." ( Dan. 4:27) And there is another besides this; constancy in prayer, and persevering attendance on the intercessions made with God. In like manner fasting brings to us some, and that not small comfort and release from sins committed, provided it be attended with kindness to others, and quenches the vehemence of the wrath of God. (1 Tim. 2:1) For "water will quench a blazing fire, and by almsdeeds sins are purged away." (Sir. 3:30) Let us then travel along all these ways; for if we give ourselves wholly to these employments, if on them we spend our time, not only shall we wash off our bygone transgressions, but shall gain very great profit for the future. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 7 on John

For God, being merciful, hath even after this given to us various ways of reconciliation, of all which the first is that by alms-doing. "By alms-deeds," it saith, "and deeds of faith sins are cleansed away." (Sir. 3:30) By alms-doing I do not mean that which is maintained by injustice, for this is not alms-doing, but savageness and inhumanity. What profits it to strip one man and clothe another? For we ought to begin the action with mercy, but this is inhumanity. If we give away everything that we have got from other people, it is no gain to us. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 73 on John

And after prayer thus intense, there is need of much almsgiving: for this it is which especially gives strength to the medicine of repentance. And as there is a medicine among the physicians' helps which receives many herbs, but one is the essential, so also in case of repentance this is the essential herb, yea, it may be everything. For hear what the Divine Scripture says, "Give alms, and all things shall be clean." (Luke 11:41) And again, "By alms-giving and acts of faithfulness sins are purged away." (Prov. 16:6) And, "Water will quench a flaming fire, and alms will do away with great sins." (Sir. 3:30) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on Hebrews

And its efficacy, as Scripture proves, is incalculable. Let no one therefore, dearly beloved, flatter himself on any merits of a good life, if works of charity be wanting in him, and let him not trust in the purity of his body, if he be not cleansed by the purification of almsgiving.  For "almsgiving wipes out sin," (Sir. 3:30) kills death, and extinguishes the punishment of perpetual fire.  But he who has not been fruitful therein, shall have no indulgence from the great Recompenser, as Solomon says, "He that closeth his ears lest he should hear the weak, shall himself call upon the Lord, and there shall be none to hear him." (Prov. 21:13) - St. Leo the Great, Sermon 10, 4

Furthermore, in the distribution of alms and care of the poor, let our Christian fast-times be fat and abound; and let each bestow on the weak and destitute those dainties which he denies himself.  Let pains be taken that all may bless God with one mouth, and let him that gives some portion of substance understand that he is a minister of the Divine mercy; for God has placed the cause of the poor in the hand of the liberal man; that the sins which are washed away either by the waters of baptism, or the tears of repentance, may be also blotted out by alms-giving; for the Scripture says, "As water extinguisheth fire, so alms extinguisheth sin." (Sir. 3:30) - St. Leo the Great, Sermon 50, 6

Sir. 3:31
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 31

Sir. 3:33
For after that grace of baptism which is common to all, and that most precious gift of martyrdom which is gained by being washed in blood, there are many fruits of penitence by which we can succeed in expiating our sins. For eternal salvation is not only promised to the bare fact of penitence, of which the blessed Apostle Peter says: "Repent and be converted that your sins may be forgiven;" (Acts 3:19; Matt. 3:2) and John the Baptist and the Lord Himself: "Repent ye, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand:" (but also by the affection of love is the weight of our sins overwhelmed: for "charity covers a multitude of sins." (1 Pet. 4:8 ) In the same way also by the fruits of almsgiving a remedy is provided for our wounds, because "As water extinguishes fire, so does almsgiving extinguish sin."(Sir. 3:33)  - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 20: Conference of Abbot Pinufius, 8

St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 28: To Theodore

Sir. 4:3
Again, I declare this not for the purpose of accusing those who have taken flight, for it is said, "Add not more trouble to a heart that is vexed;" (Sir. 4:3) nor do I say it because I wish to rebuke; (for the sick man stands in need of consolation); but for the purpose of endeavouring to promote an amendment. Let us not entrust our safety to flight, but flee from sins, and depart from our evil way. If we escape from these things, although we be in the midst of ten thousand soldiers; not one of them will be able to smite us; but not flying from these, though we ascend to the very summit of the mountains, we shall there find innumerable enemies! - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies Concerning the Statues, 6

Sir. 4:8
I say, if thou wilt not give, yet why dost thou strike? If thou wilt not be bounteous, yet why be insolent? "But he submits not to be put off in any other way." Well then, as that wise man commanded, so do. "Answer him peaceable words with meekness." For not of his own accord, surely, is he so very importunate. For there is not, there cannot be, any man desiring to be put to shame for its own sake. How much soever any may contend, I cannot yield ever to be convinced that a man who was living in plenty would choose to beg. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 35 on Matthew

Dishonor not then thy tongue, for how will it entreat for thee, when it hath lost its proper confidence? but adorn it with gentleness, with humility, make it worthy of the God who is entreated, fill it with blessing, with much almsdoing. For it is possible even with words to do alms. "For a word is a better thing than a gift," (Sir. 18:16) and "answer the poor man peaceably with meekness." (Sir.4:8 ) And all the rest of thy time too adorn it with the rehearsing of the laws of God; "Yea, let all thy communication be in the law of the Most High." (Sir. 9:15) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 51 on Matthew

On this account one of the wisest of men, having regard to the avarice and pride of human nature, and considering the nature of poverty and its terrible power to depress even the noblest character, and induce it often to act in these same respects without shame, in order that a man should not be irritated when accused, nor be provoked by continual importunity to become an enemy where he ought to bring aid, he instructs him to be affable and accessible to the suppliant, saying, "Incline thine ear to a poor man and give him a friendly answer with meekness." (Sir. 4:8 ) - St. John Chrysostom, Treatise on the Priesthood, 3

Sir. 4:9
Perhaps all this happens that the question may be asked of the robber: Thou wast rich, wherefore didst thou seize on the goods of others? Need did not force thee, poverty did not drive thee to it. Did I not make thee rich, that thou mightest have no excuse? So, too, it may be said to a person of power: Why didst thou not aid the widow, the orphans also, when enduring wrong? Wast thou powerless? Couldst thou not help? I made thee for this purpose, not that thou mightest do wrong, but that thou mightest check it. Is it not written for thee "Save him that endureth wrong?" (Sir. 4:9) Is it not written for thee: "Deliver the poor and needy out of the hand of the sinner"? (Ps. 82:4) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 16

Sir. 4:24
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 1, 1

Sir. 4:25
Who can credit the fact that one, who is the glory of the Furian stock and whose grandfathers and great grandfathers have been consuls, moves amid the senators in their purple clothed in sombre garb, and that, so far from blushing when he meets the eyes of his companions, he actually derides those who deride him! "There is a shame that leadeth to death and there is a shame that leadeth to life." (Sir. 4:25) It is a monk's first virtue to despise the judgments of men and always to remember the apostle's words:--"If I yet pleased men, I should not be the servant of Christ." (Gal. 1:10) - Bl. Jerome, Letter 66: To Pammachius, 6

Sir. 4:28
St. Athanasius, Against the Arians, 6

Sir. 4:31
But do thou, I pray, receive the testimonies, and seal them in thine heart.  And, since they are many, and the rest of our time is narrowed into a short space, listen now to a few of the more important as time permits; and having received these beginnings, be diligent and seek out the remainder.  Let not thine hand be only stretched out to receive, but let it be also ready to work. (Sir. 4:31) - St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 13, 8

Sir. 4:33
Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 2, 5
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Sirach 5-9

Sir. 5:6
Many of the more careless sort of persons, using the lovingkindness of God to increase the magnitude of their sins and the excess of their disregard, speak in this way, "There is no hell, there is no future punishment, God forgives us all sins." To stop whose mouths a wise man says, "Say not, His mercy is great, He will be pacified for the multitude of my sins; for mercy and wrath come from Him, and His indignation resteth upon sinners" (Sir 5:6): and again, "As His mercy is great, so is His correction also." (Sir 16:12) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 27 on John

Next he adds testimony, saying,  "It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands I of the Living God." (Heb. 10:30-31) "For" it is written: "Vengeance [belongeth] unto Me, I will recompense, saith the Lord. And again, The Lord shall judge His people." "Let us fall," it is said, "into the hands of the Lord, and not into the hands of men." (Sir. 2:18) But if ye repent not, ye shall "fill into the hands of" God: that is fearful: it is nothing, to "fall into the hands of men." When, he means, we see any man punished here, let us not be terrified at the things present, but shudder at the things to come. "For according to His mercy, so is His wrath." And, "His indignation will rest upon sinners." (Sir. 5:6) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 20 on Hebrews

Listen to the Scripture, which saith, "Say not, His mercy is great, He will be pacified for the multitude of my sins." (Sir. 5:6) He does not forbid us to say, "His mercy is great." This is not what He enjoins; rather he would have us constantly say it, and with this object Paul raises all sorts of arguments, but his object is what follows. Do not, he means, admire the loving-kindness of God with this view, with a view to sinning, and saying, "His mercy will be pacified for the multitude of my sins." For it is with this object that I too discourse so much concerning His goodness, not that we may presume upon it, and do any thing we choose, because in that way this goodness will be to the prejudice of our salvation; but that we may not despair in our sins, but may repent. For "the goodness of God leadeth thee to repentance," (Rom. 2:4) not to greater wickedness. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on Ephesians

Sir. 5:7
Let us then recover ourselves: and let the old man consider that in a little while hence he will depart, since he took his pleasure long enough in his lifetime; (although what sort of pleasure is this, to live in wickedness? but for the present I so speak in respect to his way of thinking;) let him consider, besides, that it is possible for him in a short time to wash away all. The young man again, let him also consider the uncertainty of death, and that oftentimes, when many older persons continued here, the young were carried off before them. For, for this reason, that we may not make traffic of our death, it is left in uncertainty. Wherefore also a certain wise man adviseth, saying, "Make no tarrying to turn unto the Lord, and put not off from day to day: for thou knowest not what to-morrow shall bring forth." (Sir. 5:7; Prov. 27:1) For by putting off there is danger and fear; but by not putting off manifest and secure salvation. Hold fast then by virtue. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 22 on Second Corinthians

Perchance some are warmed now, and have been moved to a longing after  this good rule of life. But what is the profit, when whilst ye are here only, ye have this fire; but when ye have gone forth, ye extinguish the flame, and this desire fades. How then, in order that this may not be? While this desire is warm in you, go your way unto those angels, kindle it more. For the account that we give will not be able to set thee on fire, like as the sight of the things. Say not, I will speak with my wife, and I will settle my affairs first. This delay is the beginning of remissness. Hear, how one desired to bid farewell to them at his house, (1 Kings 19:20) and the prophet suffered him not. And why do I say, to bid farewell? The disciple desired to bury his father, (Matt. 8:21-22) and Christ allowed not so much as this. And yet what thing seems to thee to be so necessary as the funeral of a father? but not even this did He permit. Why could this have been? Because the devil is at hand fierce, desiring to find some secret approach; and though it be but a little hindrance or delay he takes hold of, he works a great remissness. Therefore one adviseth, "Put not off from day to day." (Sir. 5:7) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 68 on Matthew

Sir. 5:8
But as it is not well that those who have fallen near the very extremity of life should abandon hope, if they be sober minded, so on the other hand it is not safe to feed upon this hope, and say, "Here for a while, I will enjoy the sweets of life, but afterwards, when I have worked for a short time, I shall receive the wages of the whole working time. For I recollect hearing you often say, when many were exhorting you to frequent the schools; "But what if I bring my life to a bad end in a short space of time, how shall I depart to Him who has said `Delay not to turn to the Lord, nor put off day after day?'" (Sir. 5:8 ) - St. John Chrysostom, An Exhortation to Timothy After His Fall, Letter 2

 On this account he has made our end invisible, in order that we might make our diligence and our forethought plain. Dost thou not see men taken away prematurely day after day? On this account a certain one admonishes "make no tarrying to turn to the Lord and put not off from day to day," (Sir. 5:8 ) lest at any time, as thou delayest, thou art destroyed. Let the old man keep this admonition, let the young man take this advice. Yea, art thou in security, and art thou rich, and dost thou abound in wealth, and does no affliction happen to thee? Still hear what Paul says "when they say peace and safety, then sudden destruction cometh upon them." (1 Thes. 5:3) Affairs are full of much change. We are not masters of our end. Let us be masters of virtue. - St. John Chrysostom, Three Homilies Concerning the Power of Demons, 2

Sir. 6:6
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 18: To John

Sir. 6:14-16
He who loves, ought so to love, that if he were asked even for his soul, and it were possible, he would not refuse it. I do not say "if he were asked," but so that he would even run to present him with the gift. For nothing, nothing can be sweeter than such love; nothing will fall out there that is grievous. Truly "a faithful friend is the medicine of life." (Sir. 6:16) Truly "a faithful friend is a strong defense." (Sir. 6:14) For what will not a genuine friend perform? What pleasure will he not afford? what benefit? what security? Though you should name infinite treasures, none of them is comparable to a genuine friend. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on First Thessalonians

Sir. 6:16
 It gives a very great impetus to mutual love if one shows love in return to those who love us and proves that one does not love them less than oneself is loved, especially if one shows it by the proofs that a faithful friendship gives. What is so likely to win favour as gratitude? What more natural than to love one who loves us? What so implanted and so impressed on men's feelings as the wish to let another, by whom we want to be loved, know that we love him? Well does the wise man say: "Lose thy money for thy brother and thy friend." (Sir. 29:10) And again: "I will not be ashamed to defend a friend, neither will I hide myself from him." (Sir. 22:31) If, indeed, the words in Ecclesiasticus testify that the medicine of life and immortality is in a friend; (Sir. 6:16) yet none has ever doubted that it is in love that our best defence lies. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 7

Open thy breast to a friend that he may be faithful to thee, and that thou mayest receive from him the delight of thy life. "For a faithful friend is the medicine of life and the grace of immortality." (Sir. 6:16) Give way to a friend as to an equal, and be not ashamed to be beforehand with thy friend in doing kindly duties. For friendship knows nothing of pride. So the wise man says: "Do not blush to greet a friend." (Sir. 22:25) Do not desert a friend in time of need, nor forsake him nor fail him, for friendship is the support of life. Let us then bear our burdens as the Apostle has taught: (Gal. 6:2) for he spoke to those whom the charity of the same one body had embraced together. If friends in prosperity help friends, why do they not also in times of adversity offer their support? Let us aid by giving counsel, let us offer our best endeavours, let us sympathize with them with all our heart. If necessary, let us endure for a friend even hardship. Often enmity has to be borne for the sake of a friend's innocence; oftentimes revilings, if one defends and answers for a friend who is found fault with and accused. Do not be afraid of such displeasure, for the voice of the just says: "Though evil come upon me, I will endure it for a friend's sake." (Sir. 22:26) In adversity, too, a friend is proved, for in prosperity all seem to be friends. But as in adversity patience and endurance are needed, so in prosperity strong influence is wanted to check and confute the arrogance of a friend who becomes overbearing. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 22

Sir. 6:34
Did He make thy hands? Preserve them for His use, not for the devil, not putting them out for robbery and rapine, but for His commandments and for good deeds, for earnest prayers, for holding out help to the fallen. Hath He made thine ears? Give these to Him, and not to effeminate strains nor to disgraceful tales; but "let all thy communication be in the law of the Most High." (Sir. 9:15) For "stand," he says, "in the multitude of the elders, and whoever is wise, cleave unto him." (Sir. 6:34) Did he make thy mouth? Let it do nought that is displeasing to Him, but sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. "Let no corrupt speech proceed out of your mouth," says the Apostle, "but such as is good for edifying as the need may be, that it may give grace to them that hear" (Eph. 4:29); for edification and not for subversion, for fair words and not for evil speaking and plotting against other, but the very opposite. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 10 on Philippians

Sir. 7:5
St. Athanasius, Defense Before Constantius, 2
St. Athanasius, History of the Arians, 7

Sir. 7:6
For if he has undertaken the office of a Teacher, and is not able to combat these enemies, and to stop their mouths who are so shameless, he will become in each case the cause of their destination who perish. And if some one has thus advised, "Seek not to be a judge, unless thou canst take away iniquity" (Sir. 7:6); much more may we say here, "Seek not to be a Teacher, if thou art unequal to the dignity of the office; but though dragged to it, decline it." Dost thou see that the love of power, the love of filthy lucre, is the cause of these evils? "Teaching things which they ought not," he says, "for filthy lucre's sake." - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Titus

Sir. 7:14
And one who mourns past transgressions, yet forsakes them not, subjects himself to the penalty of more grievous sin, since he both despises the very pardon which he might have won by his weeping, and as it were rolls himself in miry water; because in withholding purity of life from his weeping he makes even his very tears filthy before the eyes of God.  Hence again it is written, "Repeat not a word in thy prayer" (Sir. 7:14).  For to repeat a word in prayer is, after bewailing, to commit what again requires bewailing.  Hence it is said through Isaiah, "Wash you, be ye clean" (Is. 1:16).  For he neglects being clean after washing, whosoever after tears keeps not innocency of life.  And they therefore are washed, but are in no wise clean, who cease not to bewail the things they have committed, but commit again things to be bewailed.  Hence through a certain wise man it is said, "He that is baptized from the touch of a dead body and toucheth it again, what availeth his washing" (Sir. 34:30)? - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 30

Sir. 7:23-24
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9

Sir. 7:31
He that honors the Priest, will honor God also; and he who has learnt to despise the Priest, will in process of time insult God. "He that receiveth you," He saith, "receiveth Me." (Matt. 10:40) "Hold my priests in honor" (cf Sir. 7:31), He says. The Jews learned to despise God, because they despised Moses, and would have stoned him. For when a man is piously disposed towards the Priest, he is much more so towards God. And even if the Priest be wicked, God seeing that thou respectest him, though unworthy of honor, through reverence to Him, will Himself reward thee. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Second Timothy

Sir. 7:36
Bl. Jerome, Letter 127: To Principia, 6

Sir. 7:40
Beloved , we need great diligence in all things, for we shall render account of and undergo a strict enquiry both of words and works. Our interests stop not with what now is, but a certain other condition of life shall receive us after this, and we shall be brought before a fearful tribunal. "For we must appear before the Judgment-seat of Christ, that every one may receive the things done in his body, according to that he hath done, whether it be good or bad." (2 Cor. 5:10) Let us ever bear in mind this tribunal, that we may thus be enabled at all times to continue in virtue; for as he who has cast out from his soul that day, rushes like a horse that has burst his bridle to precipices, (for "his ways are always defiled" (Ps. 10:5) and then assigning the reason the Psalmist hath added, "He putteth Thy judgments far away out of his sight";) so he that always retains this fear will walk soberly. "Remember," saith one, "thy last things, and thou shalt never do amiss." (Sir. 7:40) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 39 on John

Sir. 8:14
Such being the case, when I think over these things, and revolve them in my mind again and again, I cannot sufficiently wonder at the madness of certain men, at the impiety of their blinded understanding, at their lust of error, such that, not content with the rule of faith delivered once for all, and received from the times of old, they are every day seeking one novelty after another, and are constantly longing to add, change, take away, in religion, as though the doctrine, "Let what has once for all been revealed suffice," were not a heavenly but an earthly rule,--a rule which could not be complied with except by continual emendation, nay, rather by continual fault-finding; whereas the divine Oracles cry aloud, "Remove not the landmarks, which thy fathers have set," (Prov. 22:28 ) and "Go not to law with a Judge," (Sir. 8:14) and "Whoso breaketh through a fence a serpent shall bite him," (Eccl. 10:8 ) - St. Vincent of Lerins, The Commonitory, 21

Sir. 9:5
Was it a small sign of modesty that when Rebecca came to wed Isaac, and saw her bridegroom, she took a veil, (Gen. 24:65) that she might not be seen before they were united? Certainly the fair virgin feared not for her beauty, but for her modesty. What of Rachel, how she, when Jacob's kiss had been taken, (Gen. 29:11) wept and groaned, and would not have ceased weeping had she not known him to be a kinsman? So she both observed what was due to modesty, and omitted not kindly affection. But if it is said to a man: "Gaze not on a maid, lest she cause thee to fall," (Sir. 9:5) what is to be said to a consecrated virgin, who, if she loves, sins in mind; if she is loved, in act also? - St. Ambrose, Three Books Concerning Virgins, 3, 3

Sir. 9:7
So, opening the curtain, and looking keenly round on all that direct their eyes towards them, they show their manners; and often bending forth from within, disgrace this superficial propriety by their dangerous restlessness. "Look not round," it is said, "in the streets of the city, and wander not in its lonely places." (Sir. 9:7)  For that is, in truth, a lonely place, though there be a crowd of the licentious in it, where no wise man is present.  And these women are carried about over the temples, sacrificing and practising divination day by day, spending their time with  fortune-tellers, and begging priests, and disreputable old women; and they keep up old wives' whisperings over their cups, learning charms and incantations from soothsayers, to the ruin of the nuptial bonds. - Clement of Alexandria, 3, 4

Sir. 9:8
In the next place, He doth not here take away desire absolutely, but that desire which springs up in men from sight. For he that is curious to behold fair countenances, is himself chiefly the enkindler of the furnace of that passion, and makes his own soul a captive, and soon proceeds also to the act.  Thus we see why He said not, "whosoever shall lust to commit adultery," but, "whosoever shall look to lust." (Matt. 5:28 ) ...He said not simply, "whosoever shall desire," since it is possible for one to desire even when sitting in the mountains; but, "Whosoever shall look to lust;" that is to say, he who gathers in lust unto himself; he who, when nothing compels him, brings in the wild beast upon his thoughts when they are calm. For this comes no longer of nature, but of self-indulgence. This even the ancient Scripture corrects from the first, saying, "Contemplate not beauty which is another's." (Sir. 9:8 ) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 17 on Matthew

For while it is possible for one who looks to remain stedfast; yet care must be taken against falling. For it is possible for one who looks to slip; but it is impossible for one, who looks not, to lust. For it is not enough for the chaste to be pure; but they must give all diligence, to be beyond the range of censure, shutting out all ground of suspicion, in order to the consummation of chastity; so that we may not only be faithful, but appear worthy of trust. For this is also consequently to be guarded against, as the apostle says, "that no man should blame us; providing things honourable, not only in the sight of the Lord, but also in the sight of men." (2 Cor. 8:20-21) "But turn away thine eyes from a graceful woman, and contemplate not another's beauty," says the Scripture. (Sir. 9:8 ) And if you require the reason, it will further tell you, "For by the beauty of woman many have gone astray, and at it affection blazes up like fire;" (Sir. 9:8 ) the affection which arises from the fire which we call love, leading to the fire which will never cease in consequence of sin. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 11 

Sir. 9:9
Again, is any one taken captive by love of money? let him hear, that "There is not a more wicked thing than a covetous man: for this man setteth even his own soul for sale" (Sir. 9:9); and how Christ saith, "Ye cannot serve God and mammon" (Matt. 6:24); and the Apostle, that "the love of money is a root of all evils" (1 Tim. 6:10); and the Prophet, "If riches flow in, set not your heart upon them" (Ps. 62:10); and many other like sayings. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 29 on Acts

Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 9:13
On this account a certain wise man said, "Give me neither poverty nor riches." (Prov. 30:8) However it is neither poverty nor riches, but the will that cannot use either of them. "Acknowledge," he says, "that thou passest through the midst of snares." (Sir. 9:13) The blessed Paul has admirably said, "Hereunto we are appointed." He has not said merely, that we are tempted, but that "hereunto we are appointed," as if he had said, For this were we born. This is our business, this our life, and dost thou seek rest? The executioner does not stand over us, lacerating our sides, and compelling us to sacrifice; but the desire of riches, and of possessing more, is instant, tearing out our eyes. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 3 on First Thessalonians

St. John Chrysostom, Homilies On the Statues, 15

Sir. 9:15
But no man is willing to give heed to the Scriptures. For if we did give heed, not only should we not be ourselves entangled by deceit, but we should also set others free who are deceived, and should draw them out of dangers. For the strong soldier is not only able to help himself, but also to protect his comrade, and to free him from the malice of the enemy. But as it is, some do not even know that there are any Scriptures. Yet the Holy Spirit indeed made so many wise provisions in order that they might be safely kept... The Apostles also wrote, even as Paul likewise said, "they were written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come." (1 Cor. 10:11) And again Christ said, "Ye do err not knowing the Scriptures" (Matt. 22:29): and again Paul said, "That through patience and comfort of the Scriptures we may have hope." (Rom. 15:4) And again, "All Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable." (2 Tim. 3:16) And "let the word of Christ dwell in you richly." (Col. iii. 16.) And the prophet, "he shall meditate in His Law day and night" (Ps. 1:2), and again in another place, "Let all thy communication be in the law of the Most High." (Sir. 9:15) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 8 on Hebrews

Did He make thy hands? Preserve them for His use, not for the devil, not putting them out for robbery and rapine, but for His commandments and for good deeds, for earnest prayers, for holding out help to the fallen. Hath He made thine ears? Give these to Him, and not to effeminate strains nor to disgraceful tales; but "let all thy communication be in the law of the Most High." (Sir. 9:15) For "stand," he says, "in the multitude of the elders, and whoever is wise, cleave unto him." (Sir. 6:34) Did he make thy mouth? Let it do nought that is displeasing to Him, but sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. "Let no corrupt speech proceed out of your mouth," says the Apostle, "but such as is good for edifying as the need may be, that it may give grace to them that hear" (Eph. 4:29); for edification and not for subversion, for fair words and not for evil speaking and plotting against other, but the very opposite. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 10 on Philippians

But he waits for him to do the work that so he may then receive the favor. For if he had said this at the beginning he might have set him free from the fear. Wherefore he not only does not so, but by the instance of leaven allows him not even a hope of return, but reserves him unto that day: "Purge out (so he says) the old leaven;" and, "let us not keep the feast with old leaven." But as soon as he had repented, he brought him in again with all earnestness. But why does he call it "old?" Either because our former life was of this sort, or because that which is old is "ready to vanish away," (Heb. 8:13) and is unsavory and foul; which is the nature of sin. For He neither simply finds fault with the old, nor simply praises the new, but with reference to the subject matter. And thus elsewhere He saith, (Sir. 9:15) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 15 on First Corinthians

Dishonor not then thy tongue, for how will it entreat for thee, when it hath lost its proper confidence? but adorn it with gentleness, with humility, make it worthy of the God who is entreated, fill it with blessing, with much almsdoing. For it is possible even with words to do alms. "For a word is a better thing than a gift," (Sir. 18:16) and "answer the poor man peaceably with meekness." (Sir.4:8) And all the rest of thy time too adorn it with the rehearsing of the laws of God; "Yea, let all thy communication be in the law of the Most High." (Sir. 9:15) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 51 on Matthew

Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 9:16
For the licentious rush readily into uncleanness, like swine rushing to that part of the hold of the ship which is depressed. Whence the Scripture most strenuously exhorts, "Introduce not every one into thy house, for the snares of the crafty are many." (Sir. 11:29) And in another place, "Let just men be thy guests, and in the fear of the Lord let thy boast remain." (Sir. 9:16) Away with fornication. "For know this well," says the apostle, "that no fornicator, or unclean person, or covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God." (Eph. 5:5) But these women delight in intercourse with the effeminate. And crowds of abominable creatures flow in, of unbridled tongue, filthy in body, filthy in language; men enough for lewd offices, ministers of adultery, giggling and whispering, and shamelessly making through their noses sounds of lewdness and fornication to provoke lust, endeavouring to please by lewd words and attitudes, inciting to laughter, the precursor of fornication. And sometimes, when inflamed by any provocation, either these fornicators, or those that follow the rabble of abominable creatures to destruction, make a sound in their nose like a frog, as if they had got anger dwelling in their nostrils. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 4
 
Sir. 9:18
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 9:20
St. John Chrysostom, Homilies On the Statues, 15
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Sirach 10-14

Sir. 10:9
Well does one of our own writers say: "the philosophers are the patriarchs of the heretics." (Tertullian, Against Hermogenes)  It is they who have stained with their perverse doctrine the spotlessness of the Church, not knowing that of human weakness it is said: "Why is earth and ashes proud?" (Sir. 10:9) So likewise the apostle: "I see another law in my members warring against the law of my mind and bringing me into captivity"; (Rom. 7:23) and again, "The good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not that I do." (Rom. 7:19) Now if Paul does what he wills not, what becomes of the assertion that a man may be without sin if he will? Given the will, how is it to have its way when the apostle tells us that he has no power to do what he wishes? Moreover if we ask them who the persons are whom they regard as sinless they seek to veil the truth by a new subterfuge. -  Bl. Jerome, Letter 133: To Ctesiphon, 2

Learn we then, from what hath been said, His kindness and gentleness; "Learn of Me, for I am meek and lowly of heart" (Matt. 11:29); and let us cast away all bitterness. If any exalt himself against us, let us be humble; if any be bold, let us wait upon him; if any bite and devour us with mocks and jests, let us not be overcome; lest in defending ourselves we destroy ourselves. For wrath is a wild beast, a wild beast keen and angry. Let us then repeat to ourselves soothing charms drawn from the holy Scripture, and say, "Thou art earth and ashes." "Why is earth and ashes proud?" (Sir. 10:9), and, "The sway of his fury shall be his destruction" (Sir 1:22): and, "The wrathful man is not comely" (Prov. 11:25); for there is nothing more shameful, nothing uglier than a visage inflamed with anger. As when you stir up mud there is an ill savor, so when a soul is disturbed by passion there is great indecency and unpleasantness. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 48 on John

How long shall we be puffed up thus ridiculously? For as we laugh, when we see children drawing themselves up, and looking haughty, or when we see them picking up stones and throwing them, thus too the haughtiness of men belongs to a puerile intellect, and an unformed mind. "Why are earth and ashes proud?" (Sir. 10:9) Art thou highminded, O man? and why? tell me what is the gain? Whence art thou highminded against those of thine own kind? Dost not thou share the same nature? the same life? Hast not thou received like honor from God? But thou art wise? Thou oughtest to be thankful, not to be puffed up. Haughtiness is the first act of ingratitude, for it denies the gift of grace.  - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 5 on Philippians

For since he had no sins to speak of, but shone with good works; having run about in every direction and found no very great handle against himself, he betakes himself to his nature; and since the name of "earth" is in some way or other one of dignity, he added to it that of "ashes." Wherefore also another saith, "Why is earth and ashes proud?" (Sir. 10:9) For tell me not of the bloom of the countenance, nor of the uplifted neck, nor of the mantle, and the horse, and the followers; but reflect where all these things do end, and put that to them. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 23 on Second Corinthians

And why do I speak of leading an army, and guiding a people, and managing households; for should he be a king, he is the most wretched of all men, and a pest to the world, and the poorest of all men. For he will feel like one of the common sort, not accounting all men's possessions to be his, but himself to be one of all; and when spoiling all men's goods, thinks himself to have less than any. For measuring the things present by his desire for those whereof he is not yet possessed, he will account the former nothing compared to the latter. Wherefore also one saith, "There is not a more wicked thing than a covetous man." (Sir. 10:9) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 80 on Matthew

Let the humble hear, "Humility goeth before glory; let the haughty hear, The spirit is exalted before a fall (Prov. 15:33; 16:18).  Let the humble hear, "Unto whom shall I have respect, but to him that is humble and quiet, and that trembleth at my words" (Is. 66:2)?  Let the haughty hear, "Why is earth and ashes proud" (Sir. 10:9)?  Let the humble hear, "God hath respect unto the things that are humble.  Let the haughty hear, And lofty things He knoweth afar off" (Ps. 137:6). - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 17

St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 18: To John

Sir. 10:12-13
He who is puffed up therefore, suffers the same punishment with the devil. "For the beginning of pride is not to know the Lord." (Sir. 10:12-13) Pride is the beginning of sin, the first impulse and movement toward evil. Perhaps indeed it is both the root and the foundation. For "the beginning" means either the first impulse towards evil, or the grounding. As if one should say, the beginning of chastity is to abstain from the sight of an improper object, that is the first impulse. But if we should say, the beginning of chastity is fasting, that is the foundation and establishment. So also pride is the beginning of sin. For every sin begins from it, and is maintained by it. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 1 on Second Thessalonians

Sir. 10:12
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 16 on John

Sir. 10:13
But when thou, who art guilty before thy Lord of the same things as they, and hast thyself offended, art displeased at the good of others, and thinkest great things, as if thou alone oughtest to be partaker of the grace, thou art guilty not only of envy and insolence, but of extreme folly, and mayest be liable to all the severest torments; for thou hast planted within thyself the root of all evils, pride. Wherefore a wise man has said, "Pride is the beginning of sin" (Sir. 10:13): that is, its root, its source, its mother. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on John

Let the humble hear, "That the Son of Man came not to be ministered unto, but to minister" (Matth. 20:28); let the haughty hear, that "The beginning of all sin is pride" (Sir. 10:13).  Let the humble hear, that "Our Redeemer humbled himself, being made obedient even unto death" (Phil. 2:8); let the haughty hear what is written concerning their head, "He is king over all the sons of pride" (Job 41:25).  The pride, therefore, of the devil became the occasion of our perdition, and the humility of God has been found the argument for our redemption.  For our enemy, having been created among all things, desired to appear exalted above all things; but our Redeemer, remaining great above all things, deigned to become little among all things. Let the humble, then, be told that, when they abase themselves, they ascend to the likeness of God; let the haughty be told that, when they exalt themselves, they fall into imitation of the apostate angel. - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 17

Sir. 10:14
Is another proud? Let him hear that "God resisteth the proud" (James 4:6); and, "Pride is the beginning of sin" (Sir. 10:14) and, "Every one that hath a high heart, is impure before the Lord." (Prov. 16:5) And in the histories, the devil, and all the rest. In a word, since it is impossible to recount all, let each choose out from the Divine Scriptures the remedies for his own hurts. So wash out, if not the whole at once, a part at any rate, part today, and part tomorrow, and then the whole.  - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 29 on Acts

Sir. 10:28
Should we have a contest with him who wears the purple, let us consider that in insulting him, we insult ourselves, for we become worthy to be disgraced. Tell me, what dost thou mean? When thou art a citizen of Heaven, and hast the Philosophy that is above, dost thou disgrace thyself with him "that mindeth earthly things"? (Phil. 3:19) For though he be in possession of countless riches, though he be in power, he does not as yet know the good that is therein. Do not in insulting him, insult thyself. Spare thyself, not him. Honor thyself, not him. Is there not some Proverb such as this, He that honoreth; honoreth himself? With good reason: for he honors not the other, but himself. Hear what a certain wise man says, "Do honor to thy soul according to the dignity thereof." (Sir. 10:28) "According to the dignity thereof," what is this? if he have defrauded (it means), do not thou defraud; if he has insulted, do not thou insult. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 25 on Hebrews

Sir. 11:1
For affliction is an unbroken bond, the increase of love, the occasion of compunction and piety. Hear the words of David, "It is good for me that I have been afflicted, that I might learn Thy statutes." (Ps. 119:71) And again another prophet, who saith, "It is good for a man that he bear the yoke in his youth." (Lam. 3:27) And again, "Blessed is the man whom Thou chastenest, O Lord." (Ps. 94:12) And another who saith, "Despise not the chastening of the Lord." (Prov. 3:11) And "if thou come near to serve the Lord, prepare thy soul for temptation." (Sir. 11:1) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 15 on Philippians

Sir. 11:2-3
David was little, and short of stature; nevertheless, one so short and little, and bare of all arms, brought down at one blow so large an army, and that tower of flesh; and this without hurling spear, or letting fly arrow, or unsheathing sword, but doing all with a small pebble! For this reason a certain one exhorts, saying, "Commend not a man for his beauty, neither abhor a man for his outward appearance. The bee is little among such as fly, but her fruit is the chief of sweet things." (Sir. 11:2-3) - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 17 

Sir. 11:2
God made thee beautiful, that He might be admired even in thy beauty, and not that He might be insulted. Do not therefore make Him so ill a return, but requite Him with modesty and chastity. God made thee beautiful, that He might increase the trials of thy modesty. For it is much harder for one that is lovely to be modest, than for one who has no such attractions, for which to be courted. Why does the Scripture tell us, that "Joseph was a goodly person, and well favored" (Gen. 39:6), but that we might the more admire his modesty coupled with beauty? Has God made thee beautiful? Why dost thou make thyself otherwise? For as though one should overlay a golden statue with a daubing of mire, so it is with those women that use paints. Thou besmearest thyself with red and white earth! But the homely, you say, may fairly have recourse to this. And why? To hide their ugliness? It is a vain attempt. For when was the natural appearance improved upon by that which is studied and artificial? And why shouldest thou be troubled at thy want of beauty, since it is no reproach? For hear the saying of the Wise Man, "Commend not a man for his beauty, neither abhor a man for his outward appearance." (Sir. 11:2) Let God be rather admired, the best Artificer, and not man, who has no merit in being made such as he is. What are the advantages, tell me, of beauty? None. It exposes its possessor to greater trials, mishaps, perils, and suspicions. She that wants it escapes suspicion; she that possesses it, except she practice a great and extraordinary reserve, incurs an evil report, and what is worse than all, the suspicion of her husband, who takes less pleasure in beholding her beauty, than he suffers pain from jealousy. And her beauty fades in his sight from familiarity, whilst she suffers in her character from the imputation of weakness, dissipation, and wantonness, and her very soul becomes degraded and full of haughtiness. To these evils personal beauty is exposed. But she who has not this attraction, escapes unmolested.  - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on First Timothy

Sir. 11:3
Let us then also seek after this beauty ourselves, and we shall be able to create it. Seek not thou at thy wife's hand, things which she is not able to possess. Seest thou that the Church had all things at her Lord's hands? By Him was made glorious, by Him was made pure, by Him made without blemish? Turn not thy back on thy wife because of her deformity. Hear the Scripture that saith, "The bee is little among such as fly, but her fruit is the chief of sweet things." (Sir. 11:3) She is of God's fashioning. Thou reproachest not her, but Him that made her; what can the woman do? Praise her not for her beauty. Praise and hatred and love based on personal beauty belong to unchastened souls. Seek thou for beauty of soul. Imitate the Bridegroom of the Church. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 20 on Ephesians

Do you not see how the bee dies upon the sting? By that animal God instructs us not to grieve our neighbors. For we ourselves receive death first. For by striking them perhaps we have pained them for a little time, but we ourselves shall not live any longer, even as that animal will not. And yet the Scripture commends it, saying that it is a worker, whose work kings and private men make use of for their health. (Sir. 11:3) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 10 on First Thessalonians

St. Basil, Letter 8: To the Caesareans

Sir. 11:4
Let us then pursue that glory, than which nothing is more venerable; and leave the glory of the world, as beyond anything worthless. "Boast not of thy clothing and raiment." (Ecclus. xi. 4.) This was the advice given of old to the simple. Indeed the dancer, the harlot, the player, are arrayed in a gayer and more costly robe than thou. And besides, this boasting were of that, which if but moths attack, they can rob thee of its enjoyment. Dost thou see what an unstable thing it is, this glory of the present life? Thou pridest thyself upon that which insects make and destroy. For Indian insects, it is said, spin those fine threads of which your robes are made. But rather seek a clothing woven from things above, an admirable and radiant vesture, raiment of real gold; of gold not dug by malefactors' hands out of the mine, but the produce of virtue. Let us clothe ourselves with a robe not the manufacture of poor men or slaves, but wrought by our Lord Himself. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on First Timothy

Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 11

Sir. 11:10
Often the care of government, when undertaken, distracts the heart in divers directions; and one is found unequal to dealing with particular things, while with confused mind divided among many.  Whence a certain wise man providently dissuades, saying, "My son, meddle not with many matters" (Sir. 11:10); because, that is, the mind is by no means collected on the plan of any single work while parted among divers. - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 1, 3

Sir. 11:15
Think of those who are very rich, who perish anyhow in war; look round on the houses, that belonged to the great and illustrious, and are now leveled to the ground. Consider how mighty they were, and now not even a memorial of them is left. For, if you will, every day you may find examples of these things--the successions of rulers,--the confiscations of rich men's goods. "Many tyrants have sat upon the ground--and he who was never thought on, has worn a diadem." (Sir. 11:15.) Do not these things happen every day? Do not our affairs resemble a kind of wheel? - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 1 on Second Thessalonians

But since thy soul is grievously upset and vexed on account of the expectation often entertained that thy husband would attain the rank of prefect, and the thought that he was untimely snatched away from that dignity consider first of all this fact, that even if this hope was a very well grounded one nevertheless it was only a human hope, which often falls to the ground; and we see many things of this kind happening in life, those which were confidently expected having remained unfulfilled, whereas those which never even entered the mind have frequently come to pass, and this we constantly see occurring everywhere in cases of governments and kingdoms, and inheritances, and marriages. Wherefore even if the opportunity were very near at hand, yet as the proverb says "between the cup and the lip there is many a slip" and the Scripture saith "from the morning until the evening the time is changed." (Sir. 18:26)  So also a king who is here to-day is dead tomorrow; and again this same wise man illustrating the reversal of men's hopes says "many tyrants have sat down upon the ground, and one that was never thought of has worn the crown." (Sir. 11:5) - St. John Chrysostom, Letter to a Young Widow

Sir. 11:25
Having found myself aground in the shallows of Fabiola's sin, I have dwelt thus long upon her penitence in order that I might open up a larger and quite unimpeded space for the description of her praises. Restored to communion before the eyes of the whole church, what did she do? In the day of prosperity she was not forgetful of affliction; (Sir. 11:25) and, having once suffered shipwreck she was unwilling again to face the risks of the sea. Instead therefore of re-embarking on her old life, she broke up and sold all that she could lay hands on of her property (it was large and suitable to her rank), and turning it into money she laid out this for the benefit of the poor. - Bl. Jerome, Letter 77: To Oceanus, 6

Sir. 11:28
That is, when those are brought into public view, who have suffered unnumbered ills, deigned to make them apostatize from the faith, and yet have not yielded, but have believed, God is glorified. Then is shown the glory of these men also. "Judge none blessed," it says, "before his death." (Sir. 11:28) On this account he says, in that day will be shown those who believed. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 3 on Second Thessalonians

Sir. 11:29
For the licentious rush readily into uncleanness, like swine rushing to that part of the hold of the ship which is depressed. Whence the Scripture most strenuously exhorts, "Introduce not every one into thy house, for the snares of the crafty are many." (Sir. 11:29) And in another place, "Let just men be thy guests, and in the fear of the Lord let thy boast remain." (Sir. 9:16) Away with fornication. "For know this well," says the apostle, "that no fornicator, or unclean person, or covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and of God." (Eph. 5:5) But these women delight in intercourse with the effeminate. And crowds of abominable creatures flow in, of unbridled tongue, filthy in body, filthy in language; men enough for lewd offices, ministers of adultery, giggling and whispering, and shamelessly making through their noses sounds of lewdness and fornication to provoke lust, endeavouring to please by lewd words and attitudes, inciting to laughter, the precursor of fornication. And sometimes, when inflamed by any provocation, either these fornicators, or those that follow the rabble of abominable creatures to destruction, make a sound in their nose like a frog, as if they had got anger dwelling in their nostrils. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 4

Sir. 11:30
But that even the powers above are, as we said, subject to change is shown by those who fell from their ranks through the fault of a corrupt will. Wherefore we ought not to think that the nature of those is unchangeable, who remain in the blessed condition in which they were created, simply because they were not in like manner led astray to choose the worse part. For it is one thing to have a nature incapable of change, and another thing for a man through the efforts of his virtue, and by guarding what is good through the grace of the unchangeable God, to be kept from change. For everything that is secured or preserved by care, can also be lost by carelessness. And so we read: "Call no man blessed before his death," (Sir. 11:30)  because so long as a man is still engaged in the struggle, and if I may use the expression, still wrestling--even though he generally conquers and carries off many prizes of victory,--yet he can never be free from fear, and from the suspicion of an uncertain issue. And therefore God alone is called unchangeable and good, as His goodness is not the result of effort, but a natural possession, and so He cannot be anything but good. No virtue then can be acquired by man without the possibility of change, but in order that when it once exists it may be continually preserved, it must be watched over with the same care and diligence with which it was acquired. - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 6: The Conference of Abbot Theodore, 16
 
Sir. 12:4
Lest they should give nothing at all to those on whom they ought to bestow something, let them hear what is written, Give to every man that asketh of thee (Luke 6:30). Lest they should give something, however little to those on whom they ought to bestow nothing at all, let them hear what is written, Give to the good man, and receive not a sinner:  do well to him that is lowly, and give not to the ungodly (Sir. 12:4).  And again, Set out thy bread and wine on the burial of the just, but eat and drink not thereof with sinners (Tob. 4:17). For he gives his bread and wine to sinners who gives assistance to the wicked for that they are wicked.  For which cause also some of the rich of this world nourish players with profuse bounties, while the poor of Christ are tormented with hunger. - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 20

Sir. 12:13
A river of fire rolls before him, the undying worm, unquenchable fire, outer darkness, gnashing of teeth. Although you should be angry with me ten thousand times for mentioning these things, I shall not cease from mentioning them. For if the prophets, though stoned, did not keep silence, much more ought we to bear with enmities, and not to discourse to you with a view to please, that we may not, for having deceived you, be ourselves cut in sunder. There is punishment, deathless, unallayed, and no one to stand up for us. "Who will pity," he says, "the charmer that is bitten by a serpent?" (Sir. 12:13) When we pity not our own selves, tell me, who will pity us? If you see a man piercing himself with a sword, will you be able to spare his life? By no means. Much more, when having it in our power to do well we do not do well, who will spare us? No one! Let us pity ourselves. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on First Thessalonians

What then can be less trustworthy than Mammon, seeing that for his sake one travels, and ventures, and is slain? "But who," it is said, "will pity a charmer that is bitten with a serpent?" (Sir. 12:13) For we ought, knowing its cruel tyranny, to flee that slavery, and destroy that grievous longing. "But how," saith one, "is this possible?" By introducing another longing, the longing for Heaven. Since he that desires the kingdom will laugh covetousness to scorn; he that is become Christ's slave is no slave of mammon, but rather his lord; for him that flieth from him, he is wont to follow, and to fly from him that pursues. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on Matthew

Sir. 13:1
You have with you one who was once your partner in the flesh but is now your partner in the spirit; once your wife but now your sister; once a woman but now a man; once an inferior but now an equal. Under the same yoke as you she hastens toward the same heavenly kingdom. A too careful management of one's income, a too near calculation of one's expenses--these are habits not easily laid aside. Yet to escape the Egyptian woman Joseph had to leave his garment with her. (Gen. 39:12) And the young man who followed Jesus having a linen cloth cast about him, when he was assailed by the servants had to throw away his earthly covering and to flee naked. (Mark 14:51-52) Elijah also when he was carried up in a chariot of fire to heaven left his mantle of sheepskin on earth. (2 Kings 2:11-13) Elisha used for sacrifice the oxen and the yokes which hitherto he had employed in his work. (1 Kings 19:21) We read in Ecclesiasticus: "he that toucheth pitch shall be defiled therewith." (Sir. 13:1) As long as we are occupied with the things of the world, as long as our soul is fettered with possessions and revenues, we cannot think freely of God. "For what fellowship hath righteousness with unrighteousness? And what communion hath light with darkness? And what concord hath Christ with Belial? Or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel?" (2 Cor. 6:14-15) - Bl. Jerome, Letter 71: To Lucinius, 3

A great work and toil it is then to keep our wayward heart from all sin, and, with the numberless allurements of pleasure to ensnare it on all sides, not to let the vigour of the mind give way to any attack.  Who "toucheth pitch, and is not defiled thereby?" (Sir. 13:1) who is not weakened by the flesh? who is not begrimed by the dust? who, lastly, is of such purity as not to be polluted by those things without which one cannot live?  For the Divine teaching commands by the Apostle's mouth that "they who have wives" should "be as though they had none:  and those that weep as though they wept not; and those that rejoice as though they rejoiced not; and those that buy as though they possessed not; and those that use this world as though they used it not; for the fashion of this world passeth away." (1 Cor. 7:29-31) - St. Leo the Great, Sermon 49, 2   

Sir. 13:2
Bl. Jerome, Letter 108: To Eustochium, 21

Sir. 13:15
Now then, come, let us examine this very question, whether sins are the effect of force and constraint, or of indolence and great carelessness. The law says, "Thou shalt not kill." What sort of force, what sort of violence, is there here? Violence indeed must one use to force himself to kill, for who amongst us would as a matter of choice plunge his sword into the throat of his neighbor, and stain his hand with blood? Not one. Thou seest then that, on the contrary, sin is more properly matter of violence and constraint. For God hath implanted in our nature a charm, which binds us to love one another. "Every beast (it saith) loveth his like, and every man loveth his neighbor." (Sir. 13:15) Seest thou that we have from our nature seeds which tend to virtue; whereas those of vice are contrary to nature? and if these latter predominate, this is but an evidence of our exceeding indolence. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Ephesians

This too St. Paul here says, calling them "covenant-breakers, without natural affection, implacable, unmerciful," and showing that they were traitors even to the gift of nature. For we have a sort of family feeling even by nature towards one another, which even beasts have got towards each other. "For every beast," it says, "loveth his like, and every man his neighbor." (Sir. 13:15) But these became more ferocious even than they. The disorder then which resulted to the world by evil doctrines, he proves to us by these witnesses, and clearly shows that the malady in either case came of the negligence of them that were disordered. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 5 on Romans

Sir. 14:1
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 14:9
Those who are contentious for the sake of money you will never persuade. They are only to be persuaded, so long as you give, and even so you will never satisfy their desires. For it is said, "The covetous man's eye is not satisfied with a portion." (Ecclus. xiv. 9.) From such then, as being incorrigible, it is right to turn away. And if he who had much obligation to fight for the truth, is advised not to engage in contention with such men, much more should we [1297] avoid it, who are in the situation of disciples. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 17 on First Timothy
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2009, 06:47:15 PM »

Sirach 15-19

Sir. 15:9
For what does it profit a man to gain the ornaments of heavenly eloquence and the most precious beauty of the Scriptures if by clinging to filthy deeds and thoughts he destroys it by burying it in the foulest ground, or defiles it by the dirty wallowing of his own lusts? For the result will be that which is an ornament to those who rightly use it, is not only unable to adorn them, but actually becomes dirty by the increased filth and mud. For "from the mouth of a sinner praise is not comely" - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 14: The First Conference of Abbot Nesteros, 16

And although, again, he conceal his natural falsehood, and pretend to speak  truth with his lips; yet are we `not ignorant of his devices,' (2 Cor. 2:11) but are able to answer him in the words spoken  by the Spirit against him; `But unto the ungodly, said God, why dost thou preach My laws?' and, `Praise is not seemly  in the mouth of a sinner.' (Ps. 1:16; Sir. 15:9) For even though he speak the truth, the deceiver is not worthy of credit. And  whereas Scripture shewed this, when relating his wicked artifices against Eve in Paradise, so the Lord also reproved  him,--first in the mount, when He laid open `the folds of his breast-plate,' (Job. 41:13) and shewed who the crafty spirit  was, and proved that it was not one of the saints, but Satan that was tempting Him. For He said, `Get thee  behind Me Satan; for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and Him only shalt thou serve.' (Matt. 4:10) - St. Athanasius, To the Bishops of Egypt, 1

Therefore, although wicked  men press forward to keep the feast, and as at a feast praise God, and intrude into the Church of the saints, yet God  expostulates, saying to the sinner, `Why dost thou talk of My ordinances?' And the gentle Spirit rebukes them, saying,  `Praise is not comely in the mouth of a sinner.' (Ps. 50:16; Sir. 15:9) Neither hath sin any place in common with the praise of God;  for the sinner has a mouth speaking perverse things, as the Proverb saith, `The mouth of the wicked answereth evil  things.' (Prov. 15:28) For how is it possible for us to praise God with an impure mouth? since things which are contrary to  each other cannot coexist. For what communion has righteousness with iniquity? or, what fellowship is there between  light and darkness? So exclaims Paul, a minister of the Gospel (2 Cor. 6:14). Thus it is that sinners, and all those who  are aliens from the Catholic Church, heretics, and schismatics, since they are excluded from glorifying (God) with  the saints, cannot properly even continue observers of the feast. But the righteous man, although he appears dying to  the world, uses boldness of speech, saying, `I shall not die, but live, and narrate all Thy marvelous deeds.' (Ps. 118:17) - St. Athanasius, Letter 7, 4

The Psalms contain all things, but the Hymns again have nothing human. When he has been instructed out of the Psalms, he will then know hymns also, as a diviner thing. For the Powers above chant hymns, not psalms. For "a hymn," saith one, "is not comely in the mouth of a sinner" (Sir. 15:9) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on Colossians

"Praise is not comely in the mouth of a sinner" (Sir. 15:9), much less from a demon. For [828] that they preach is not of men, but of the Holy Ghost. Because they did not act in a spirit of boasting. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 35 on Acts

Sir. 15:10
Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 2, 5

Sir. 15:16
For there is a spirit of meekness, and a spirit of severity. He doth not, however, choose so to call it, but from its milder aspect (apo ton chrestoteron.) And for a like reason also, God, although avenging Himself, has it often affirmed of Him that He is "gracious and long-suffering, and rich in mercy and pity:" but that He is apt to punish, once perhaps or twice, and sparingly, and that upon some urgent cause. Consider then the wisdom of Paul; holding the authority in his own hands, he leaves both his and that in the power of others, saying, "What will ye?" "The matter is at your disposal." For we too have depending on us both sides of the alternative; both falling into hell, and obtaining the kingdom:  since God hath so willed it. For, "behold," saith he, "fire and water: whichever way thou wilt, thou mayest stretch forth thine hand" (Sir 15:16) And, "If ye be willing, and will hearken unto me, ye shall eat the good of the land; (Is. 1:19) but if ye be not willing, the sword shall devour you." - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 14 on First Corinthians

Sir. 16:1
Few indeed had they then become in number, but rich in virtue. For say, what profit is it, that there should be hay in plenty, when there might be precious stones? The amount consists not in the sum of numbers, but in the proved worth. Elias was one: yet the whole world was not worth so much as he. And yet the world consists of myriads: but they are no myriads, when they do not even come up to that one. "Better is one that doeth the will of God, than ten thousand who are transgressors:" for the ten thousands have not yet reached to the one. "Desire not a multitude of unprofitable children." (Sir. 16:1) Such bring more blasphemy against God, than if they were not Christians. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 24 on Acts

Sir. 16:3
But you do not know how great a dignity this is, because we do not attain to it. For as now He is called the Lord of all Christians, and yet the name goes beyond our deserts: consider the greatness if He were called the God of one [person]! He who is called the God of the whole world is "not ashamed to be called" the God of three men: and with good reason: for the saints would turn the scale, I do not say against the world but against ten thousand such. "For one man who doeth the will of the Lord, is better than ten thousand transgressors." (Sir. 16:3) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 24 on Hebrews

Let us not then mind worldly things, nor seek our recompense here, nor be so beggarly. For if "the" whole "world is not worthy of" them, why dost thou seek after a part of it? And with good reason; for they are friends of God.  Now by "the world" does he mean here the people, or the creation itself? Both: for the Scripture is wont to use the word of both. If the whole creation, he would say, with the human beings that belong to it, were put in the balance, they yet would not be of equal value with these; and with reason. For as ten thousand measures of chaff and hay would not be of equal value to ten pearls, so neither they; for "better is one that doeth the will of the Lord, than ten thousand transgressors" (Sir. 16:3); meaning by "ten thousand" not [merely] many, but an infinite multitude. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 27 on Hebrews

For if we go on for ever flattering you, when shall we reclaim you? when shall we do you service? "But," saith one, "there are other sects, and people go over." This is a cold argument, "Better is one that doeth the will of the Lord, than ten thousand transgressors." (Sir. 16:3) For, what wouldest thou choose thyself, tell me; to have ten thousand servants that were runaways and thieves, or a single one that loved thee? Lo! I admonish and command you to break up both those gay deckings for the face, and such vessels as I have described, and give to the poor, and not to be so mad. Let him that likes quit me at once; let him that likes accuse me, I will not suffer it in any one. When I am about to be judged at the Tribunal of Christ, ye stand afar off, and your favor, while I am giving in my account. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 7 on Colossians

Where Christ is, there needs must Angels be, needs must Archangels also and the other Powers be there. Then ye are not alone, seeing ye have Him Who is Lord of all. Hear again the prophet also saying, "Better is one that doeth the will of the Lord, than ten thousand transgressors." (comp. Ecclus. xvi. 3.) Nothing more weak than a multitude of unrighteous men, nothing more strong than one man who lives according to the law of God. If thou hast children wake up them also, and let thy house altogether become a Church through the night: but if they be tender, and cannot endure the watching, let them stay for the first or second prayer, and then send them to rest: only stir up thyself, establish thyself in the habit. Nothing is better than that storehouse which receives such prayers as these. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 26 on Acts

One question still remains. What then is this matter? That if he does not overcome says one, by force, yet by deceitfulness. And on this account it were better that he should be destroyed. For if Job got the better of him, yet Adam was deceived and overthrown. Now if once for all he had been removed from the world, Adam would never have been overthrown. But now he remains, and is defeated indeed by one, but gets the better of many. Ten overcame him, but he himself overcomes and wrestles down ten thousand and if God took him away from the world, these ten thousand would not have perished. What then shall we say to this? That first of all they who overcame are more valuable far than they who are defeated, even if the latter be more, and the former less. "For better is one," saith he "that doeth the will of God than ten thousand transgressors." (Sir. 16:3) - St. John Chrysostom, Three Homilies Concerning the Power of Demons, 2

Sir. 16:12
Many of the more careless sort of persons, using the lovingkindness of God to increase the magnitude of their sins and the excess of their disregard, speak in this way, "There is no hell, there is no future punishment, God forgives us all sins." To stop whose mouths a wise man says, "Say not, His mercy is great, He will be pacified for the multitude of my sins; for mercy and wrath come from Him, and His indignation resteth upon sinners" (Sir 5:6): and again, "As His mercy is great, so is His correction also." (Sir 16:12) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 27 on John

Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9

Sir. 17:31
Beholdest thou, then, his beauty? Beholdest thou his greatness? Look also at the proof of his weakness! For a certain wise man, to make this plain, said, "What is brighter than the sun, yet the light thereof suffers eclipse." (Sir. 17:31) Nor is it only from this circumstance that his infirmity is to be perceived, but also in the concourse of the clouds. Often, at least, when a cloud passes underneath him, though emitting his beams, and endeavouring to pierce through it, he has not strength to do so; the cloud being too dense, and not suffering him to penetrate through it. - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 10

Sir. 18:13-14
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9

Sir. 18:13
For pity is peculiar to power. Consider that the world was established by pity, and then imitate thy Lord. "The mercy of man is toward his neighbor, but the mercy of the Lord is upon all flesh." (Sir.18:13) How "upon all flesh"? Whether you mean sinners, or just men, we all need the mercy of God; we all enjoy it, be it Paul, be it Peter, or be it John. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on Philippians

Sir. 18:15-17
And one who has the charge of these persons ought to be so long-suffering, as not only not to increase their despondency by his fits of anger, but also to remove the greater part of it by his exhortation. For as the man who has been insulted, although he is in the enjoyment of great abundance, does not feel the advantage of his wealth, on account of the blow which he has received from the insult; so on the other hand, the man who has been addressed with kindly words, and for whom the gift has been accompanied with encouragement, exults and rejoices all the more, and the thing given becomes doubled in value through the manner in which it is offered. And this I say not of myself, but borrow from him whose precept I quoted just now: "My son, blemish not thy good deeds, neither use uncomfortable words when thou givest anything. Shall not the dew assuage the heat? So is a word better than a gift. Lo! is not a word better than a gift? but both are with a gracious man." (Sir. 18:15-17) - St. John Chrysostom, Treatise on the Priesthood, 3 

Sir. 18:16
Knowest thou not how much power a word hath, both to raise up, and to cast down? "For a word," it is said, "is better than a gift." (Sir. 18:16)  Dost thou not consider that thou art thrusting the sword into thyself, and art receiving a more grievous wound, when he, being reviled, silently withdraws, with groans and many tears? Since indeed of God he is sent unto thee. Consider then, in insulting him, upon whom thou art causing the insult to pass; when God indeed sends him unto thee, and commands thee to give, but thou, so far from giving, dost even insult him on his coming. And if thou art not aware how exceedingly amiss this is, look at it as among men, and then thou wilt fully know the greatness of the sin. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 35 on Matthew

Dishonor not then thy tongue, for how will it entreat for thee, when it hath lost its proper confidence? but adorn it with gentleness, with humility, make it worthy of the God who is entreated, fill it with blessing, with much almsdoing. For it is possible even with words to do alms. "For a word is a better thing than a gift," (Sir. 18:16) and "answer the poor man peaceably with meekness." (Sir.4:8) And all the rest of thy time too adorn it with the rehearsing of the laws of God; "Yea, let all thy communication be in the law of the Most High." (Sir. 9:15) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 51 on Matthew 

Sir. 18:16-17
For therefore also hath almsgiving been enacted by God: since God might have nourished the poor as well without this, but that he might bind us together unto charity and that we might be thoroughly fervent toward each other, he commanded them to be nourished by us. Therefore one saith in another place also; "a good word is better than a gift;" and, "behold, a word is beyond a good gift." (Sir. 18:16-17)  And He Himself saith, "I will have mercy, and not sacrifice." (Matt. 9:30; Hos. 6:6) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 32 on First Corinthians

Sir. 18:17
St. Athanasius, Letter 19, 5

Sir. 18:25
Yesterday I said "Blessed be God!" and to-day again I say the very same thing. For although the evils we dreaded have passed away, we should not suffer the memory of them to disappear; not indeed that we may grieve, but that we may give thanks. For if the memory of these terrors abide with us, we shall never be overtaken by the actual experience of such terrors. For what need have we of the experience, whilst our memory acts the part of a monitor? Seeing then that God hath not permitted us to be overwhelmed in the flood of those troubles when upon us, let us not permit ourselves to become careless when these are passed away. Then, when we were sad, He consoled us, let us give thanks to Him now that we are joyful. In our agony He comforted us, and did not forsake us; therefore let us not betray ourselves in prosperity by declining into sloth. "Forget not," saith one, "the time of famine in the day of plenty." - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 12

Sir. 18:26
But since thy soul is grievously upset and vexed on account of the expectation often entertained that thy husband would attain the rank of prefect, and the thought that he was untimely snatched away from that dignity consider first of all this fact, that even if this hope was a very well grounded one nevertheless it was only a human hope, which often falls to the ground; and we see many things of this kind happening in life, those which were confidently expected having remained unfulfilled, whereas those which never even entered the mind have frequently come to pass, and this we constantly see occurring everywhere in cases of governments and kingdoms, and inheritances, and marriages. Wherefore even if the opportunity were very near at hand, yet as the proverb says "between the cup and the lip there is many a slip" and the Scripture saith "from the morning until the evening the time is changed." (Sir. 18:26)  So also a king who is here to-day is dead tomorrow; and again this same wise man illustrating the reversal of men's hopes says "many tyrants have sat down upon the ground, and one that was never thought of has worn the crown." (Sir. 11:5) - St. John Chrysostom, Letter to a Young Widow

Sir. 18:30
But how shall "he that loveth his life, lose it"? (Jn. 12:25) When he doeth its unseemly desires, when he gratifies it where he ought not. Wherefore one exhorteth us, saying, "Walk not in the desires of thy soul" (Sir 18:30); for so wilt thou destroy it since it leadeth away from the path leading to virtue; just as, on the contrary, "he that hateth it in this world, shall save it." (Jn. 12:25) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 67 on John

Alas! the devil, what proverbs hath he brought into the world, of power to overturn the whole life of such persons. See at least this self-same devilish and pernicious saying; of how much ruin it is full. For it means nothing else than these words, Have thou no regard to what is honorable; have thou no regard to what is just; let all those things be cast aside, seek one thing alone, pleasure. Though the thing stifle thee, let it be thy choice; though all that meet thee spurn thee, though they smear thy face with mire, though they drive thee away as a dog, bear all. And what else would swine say, if they had a voice? What else would filthy dogs? But perhaps not even they would have said such things, as the devil hath persuaded men to rave. Wherefore I entreat you, being conscious of the senselessness of such words as these, to flee such proverbs, and to choose out those in the Scriptures that are contrary to them.  But what are these? "Go not," it is said, "after thy lusts, and refrain thyself from thine appetites." (Sir. 18:30) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 73 on Matthew

But the experiences of those who have committed fornication, as I have already said, are types which correct our lusts. Moreover, the Pædagogue warns us most distinctly: "Go not after thy lusts, and abstain from thine appetites; (Sir. 18:30) for wine and women will remove the wise; and he that cleaves to harlots will become more daring. Corruption and the worm shall inherit him, and he shall be held up as public example to  greater shame." (Sir. 19:2-5) - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10

Sir. 18:30-31
But not only is that temperance worthy of praise which moderates food, but also that which moderates lust. Since it is written: "Go not after thy lusts, and deny thy appetite. If thou givest her desires to thy soul, thou wilt be a joy to thine enemies;" (Sir. 18:30-31) and farther on; "Wine and women make even wise men to fall away." (Sir. 19:2) So that Paul teaches temperance even in marriage itself; for he who is incontinent in marriage is a kind of adulterer, and violates the law of the Apostle. - St. Ambrose, Epistle 63

Sir. 18:32
Clement of Alexandra, The Instructor, 2, 1

Sir. 19:1
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 33

Sir. 19:2-5
But the experiences of those who have committed fornication, as I have already said, are types which correct our lusts. Moreover, the Pædagogue warns us most distinctly: "Go not after thy lusts, and abstain from thine appetites; (Sir. 18:30) for wine and women will remove the wise; and he that cleaves to harlots will become more daring. Corruption and the worm shall inherit him, and he shall be held up as public example to  greater shame." (Sir. 19:2-5) - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10

Sir. 19:2
But not only is that temperance worthy of praise which moderates food, but also that which moderates lust. Since it is written: "Go not after thy lusts, and deny thy appetite. If thou givest her desires to thy soul, thou wilt be a joy to thine enemies;" (Sir. 18:30-31) and farther on; "Wine and women make even wise men to fall away." (Sir. 19:2) So that Paul teaches temperance even in marriage itself; for he who is incontinent in marriage is a kind of adulterer, and violates the law of the Apostle. - St. Ambrose, Epistle 63

Sir. 19:10
Nay, it is sweet not to speak evil. For he that hath spoken evil is henceforth contentious; he is suspicious and he fears, repents, and gnaws his own tongue. Being timorous and trembling, lest at any time, what he said should be carried to others, and bring great peril, and useless and needless enmity, on the sayer. But he who keeps the matter to himself, will spend his days in safety, with much pleasantness. "Thou hast heard a word," we read, "let it die with thee; and be bold; it will not burst thee." (Sir. 19:10) - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 3

Sir. 19:10-11
But I know not from whence this disease has fallen upon men. We have become tattlers, nothing remains in our mind. Hear the exhortation of a wise man who says, "Hast thou heard a word? Let it die in[3] thee, be bold; it will not burst thee." (Sir. 19:10) And again, "A fool heareth a word, and travaileth, as a women in labor of a child." (Sir. 19:11.) We are ready to make accusations, prepared for condemning. Even if no other evil thing had been done by us, this were sufficient to ruin us, and to carry us away to Hell, this involves us in ten thousand evils. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 21 on Hebrews

Sir. 19:14-15
Let us therefore close up together; let us bind one another together in love, let no one separate us. If any one accuses, or is offended, let him not retain it in his mind, whether against his neighbor, or against us. This favor I ask of you, to come to us, and bring the accusation, and receive our defense. "Reprove him," it says, "lest haply he hath not said it. Reprove him, lest haply he hath not done it" (Sir. 19:14-15); and if he hath done it, that he add not thereto. For we have either defended ourselves, or being condemned have asked pardon, and henceforth endeavor not to fall into the same faults. This is expedient both for you and for us. For you indeed having accused us perhaps without reason, when you have learned the truth of the matter, will stand corrected, and we have offended unawares and are corrected. For you indeed it is not expedient. For punishment is appointed for those who utter any idle word. But we put off accusations, whether false or true. The false, by showing that they are false; the true, by not again doing the same things. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on Second Thessalonians

Sir. 19:22
Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 1, 10

Sir. 19:29-30
Rather we ought not to call such as these men, but lewd wretches (bataloi), and effeminate (gunides), whose voices are feeble, and whose clothes are womanish both in feel and dye. And such creatures are manifestly shown to be what they are from their external appearance, their clothes, shoes, form, walk, cut of their hair, look. "For from his look shall a man be known," says the Scripture, "from meeting a man the man is known: the dress of a man, the step of his foot, the laugh of his teeth, tell tales of him." (Sir. 19:29-30)  For these, for the most part, plucking out the rest of their hair, only dress that on the head, all but binding their locks with fillets like women. Lions glory in their shaggy hair, but are armed by their hair in the fight; and boars even are made imposing by their mane; the hunters are afraid of them when they see them bristling their hair. - Clement of Alexandria, 3, 3

Sir. 19:30
Bl. Jerome, Letter 107: To Laeta, 13
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Sirach 20-24

Sir. 20:5
For the only thing that is in reality shameful is wickedness, and what is done through it. In accordance with these remarks, conversation about deeds of wickedness is appropriately termed filthy [shameful] speaking, as talk about adultery and pæderasty and the like. Frivolous prating, too, is to be put to silence. "For," it is said, "in much speaking thou shalt not escape sin." (Prov. 10:19) "Sins of the tongue, therefore, shall be punished." "There is he who is silent, and is found wise; and there is he that is hated for much speech." (Sir. 20:5) But still more, the prater makes himself the object of disgust. "For he that multiplieth speech abominates his own soul." (Sir. 20:8) - Clement of Alexandria, 2, 6

Sir. 20:8
For the only thing that is in reality shameful is wickedness, and what is done through it. In accordance with these remarks, conversation about deeds of wickedness is appropriately termed filthy [shameful] speaking, as talk about adultery and pæderasty and the like. Frivolous prating, too, is to be put to silence. "For," it is said, "in much speaking thou shalt not escape sin." (Prov. 10:19) "Sins of the tongue, therefore, shall be punished." "There is he who is silent, and is found wise; and there is he that is hated for much speech." (Sir. 20:5) But still more, the prater makes himself the object of disgust. "For he that multiplieth speech abominates his own soul." (Sir. 20:8)  - Clement of Alexandria, 2, 6

Sir. 20:7
I know that most persons speak because they do not know how to keep silent. It is seldom that any one is silent even when speaking profits him nothing. He is wise, then, who knows how to keep silent. Lastly, the Wisdom of God said: "The Lord hath given to me the tongue of learning, that I should know when it is good to speak." (Is. 50:4) Justly, then, is he wise who has received of the Lord to know when he ought to speak. Wherefore the Scripture says well: "A wise man will keep silence until there is opportunity." (Sir. 20:7) Therefore the saints of the Lord loved to keep silence, because they knew that a man's voice is often the utterance of sin, and a man's speech is the beginning of human error. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 2

Sir. 20:15
Hermas, The Shepherd, Ninth Similitude, 24

Sir. 20:18
For there is no organ so convenient for him for our deception and our destruction as an unchastened tongue and an unchecked utterance. Hence come many slips on our part: hence many serious accusations against us. And the ease of these falls through the tongue a certain one showed, when he said, "Many fell by the sword, but not so many as by the tongue." (Sir. 28:22) Now the gravity of the fall the same person shows us again when he says: "To slip upon a pavement is better than to slip with the tongue." (Sir. 20:18) And what he speaks of is of this kind. Better it is, says he, that the body should fall and be crushed, than that such a word should go forth as destroys the soul; and he does not speak of falls merely; he also admonishes us that much forethought should be exercised, so that we should not be tripped up, thus saying "Make a door and bars for thy mouth," (Sir. 20:25)  not that we should prepare doors and bars, but that with much security, we should shut the tongue off from outrageous words; and again in another place, after showing that we need influence from above, both as accompanying and preceding our own effort so as to keep this wild beast within: stretching forth his hands to God, the prophet said, "Let the lifting up of my hands be an evening sacrifice, set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth, keep the door of my lips;" and he who before admonished, himself too (Ps. 142:2-3) says again "Who shall set a watch before my mouth, and a seal of wisdom upon my lips?" (Sir. 22:27) - St. John Chrysostom, Instructions to Catechumens, 1

St. Basil, Letter 260: To Optimus

Sir. 20:20
Many men, even when before sober, have often from disgraceful words gone on to disgraceful actions. For our soul is neither good nor evil by nature, but becomes both the one and the other from choice. As therefore the sail carries the ship wherever the wind may blow, or rather as the rudder moves the ship, if the wind be favorable, so also thought will sail without danger, if good words from a favorable quarter waft it. But if the contrary, often they will even overwhelm the reason. For what winds are to ships, that discourses are to souls. Wherever you will, you may move and turn it. For this reason one exhorting says, "Let thy whole discourse be in the law of the Most High." (Sir. 20:20) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Second Thessalonians

Sir. 20:25
For there is no organ so convenient for him for our deception and our destruction as an unchastened tongue and an unchecked utterance. Hence come many slips on our part: hence many serious accusations against us. And the ease of these falls through the tongue a certain one showed, when he said, "Many fell by the sword, but not so many as by the tongue." (Sir. 28:22) Now the gravity of the fall the same person shows us again when he says: "To slip upon a pavement is better than to slip with the tongue." (Sir. 20:18) And what he speaks of is of this kind. Better it is, says he, that the body should fall and be crushed, than that such a word should go forth as destroys the soul; and he does not speak of falls merely; he also admonishes us that much forethought should be exercised, so that we should not be tripped up, thus saying "Make a door and bars for thy mouth," (Sir. 20:25)  not that we should prepare doors and bars, but that with much security, we should shut the tongue off from outrageous words; and again in another place, after showing that we need influence from above, both as accompanying and preceding our own effort so as to keep this wild beast within: stretching forth his hands to God, the prophet said, "Let the lifting up of my hands be an evening sacrifice, set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth, keep the door of my lips;" and he who before admonished, himself too (Ps. 142:2-3) says again "Who shall set a watch before my mouth, and a seal of wisdom upon my lips?" (Sir. 22:27) - St. John Chrysostom, Instructions to Catechumens, 1

Sir. 20:29
But, as I said, a dreadful thing is malice, and full of hypocrisy; this hath filled the world with ten thousand evils; through this malady the law courts are filled, from this comes the desire of fame and wealth, from this the love of rule, and insolence,  through this the roads have wicked robbers and the sea pirates,  from this proceed the murders through the world, through this our race is rent asunder, and whatever evil thou mayest see, thou wilt perceive to arise from this. This hath even burst into the churches, this hath caused ten thousand dreadful things from the beginning, this is the mother of avarice, this malady hath turned all things upside down, and corrupted justice. For "gifts," It saith, "blind the eyes of the wise, and as a muzzle on the mouth turn away reproofs." (Sir. 20:29) This makes slaves of freemen, concerning this we talk every day, and no good comes of it, we become worse than wild beasts; we plunder orphans, strip widows, do wrong to the poor, join woe to woe. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 64 on John

Who then, tell me, is the rich man? he who is daily asking, and earnestly laboring to gather much together, and fears lest at any time he should fall short, or he who gathers nothing together, and is in great abundance and hath need of no one? For it is virtue and the fear of God, and not possessions which give confidence. For these even enslave. For it is said, "Gifts and presents blind the eyes of the wise, and like a muzzle on the mouth turn away reproofs." (Sir. 20:29) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 18 on Hebrews

Sir. 20:32
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 25

Sir. 21:1
Seest thou who they are whom he mourns, and whom he does not spare? Not those who have sinned, but those who have not repented, and not simply those who have not repented, but those who have been called once and again to this work, and would not be persuaded. For the expression "I have said beforehand and do now say beforehand, as if I were present the second time, and being absent I write," implies exactly that which we are afraid may take place now in our case. For although Paul is not present who then threatened the Corinthians, yet Christ is present, who was then speaking through his mouth; and if we continue obdurate, He will not spare us, but will smite us with a mighty blow, both in this world and the next. "Let us then anticipate His countenance by our confession," (Ps. 95:42) let us pour out our hearts before Him. For "thou hast sinned," we read, "do not add thereto any more, and pray on behalf of thy former deeds;" (Sir. 21:1) and again "a righteous man is his own accuser in the first instance." (Prov. 18:17) - St. John Chrysostom, An Exhortation to Theodore After His Fall, Letter 1

With these stop the mouths of the indolent, the dissolute, the slothful, the indisposed towards the labours of virtue, those who accuse their common Master. "Thou hast sinned" he saith "be still." (Gen. 4:7) "Do not add a second more grievous sin." (Sir. 21:1) It is not so grievous to sin, as after the sin to accuse the Master. Take knowledge of the cause of the sin, and thou wilt find that it is none other than thyself who hast sinned. Everywhere there is a need of a good intention. I have shewn you this not from simple reasoning only, but from the case of fellow-servants living in the world itself. Do thou also use this proof. Thus too our common master will judge us. - St. John Chrysostom, Three Homilies Concerning the Power of Demons, 3

Sir. 21:2
You see how many varieties of uncleanness there are. The woman in child-bed is unclean. Yet God made child-birth, and the seed of copulation. Why then is the woman unclean, unless something further was intimated? And what was this? He intended to produce piety in the soul, and to deter it from fornication. For if she is unclean who has borne a child, much more she who has committed fornication. If to approach his own wife is not altogether pure, much less to have intercourse with the wife of another. He who attends a funeral is unclean, much more he who has mixed in war and slaughter. And many kinds of uncleanness would be found, if it were necessary to recount them all. But these things are not now required of us. But all is transferred to the soul. For bodily things are nearer to us, from these therefore he introduced instruction. But it is not so now. For we ought not to be confined to figures, and shadows, but to adhere to the truth, and to uphold it: sin is the unclean thing. From that let us flee, from that let us abstain. "If thou comest near it, it will bite thee." (Sir. 21:2) Nothing is more unclean than covetousness. Whence is this manifest? From the facts themselves. For what does it not defile? the hands, the soul, the very house where the ill-gotten treasure is laid up. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 3 on Titus

For if He endured for thy sake to become a slave, why wonder that He upon the same ground layeth claim to the other particulars also? For He counts nothing unworthy of Himself which may be conducive to our salvation. Since then we aware of this, let us shun sin altogether, because by reason of it He is blasphemed. For it says, "flee from sin, as from the face of a serpent: if thou comest too near unto it, it will bite thee" (Sir. 21:2): for it is not it that comes to us, but we that desert to it. God has so ordered things that the Devil should not prevail over us by compulsion (Gr. tyranny): since else none would have stood against his might. And on this account He set him a distant abode, as a kind of robber and tyrant. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 8 on Romans

Sir. 21:6
At this stage some rise up, saying that the Lord, by reason of the rod, and threatening, and fear, is not good; misapprehending, as appears, the Scripture which says, "And he that feareth the Lord will turn to his heart;" (Sir. 21:6) and most of all, oblivious of His love, in that for us He became man. For more suitably to Him, the prophet prays in these words: "Remember us, for we are dust;" (Ps. 103:14) that is, Sympathize with us; for Thou knowest from personal experience of suffering the weakness of the flesh. In this respect, therefore, the Lord the Instructor is most good and unimpeachable, sympathizing as He does from the exceeding greatness of His love with the nature of each man. "For there is nothing which the Lord hates." (Wis. 11:24) - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8

Sir. 21:20
For the seemly relaxation of the countenance in a harmonious manner--as of a musical instrument--is called a smile. So also is laughter on the face of well-regulated men termed. But the discordant relaxation of countenance in the case of women is called a giggle, and is meretricious laughter; in the case of men, a guffaw, and is savage and insulting laughter. "A fool raises his voice in laughter," (Sir. 21:20)  says the Scripture; but a clever man smiles almost imperceptibly. The clever man in this case he calls wise, inasmuch as he is differently affected from the fool. But, on the other hand, one needs not be gloomy, only grave. For I certainly prefer a man to smile who has a stern countenance than the reverse; for so his laughter will be less apt to become the object of ridicule. Smiling even requires to be made the subject of discipline. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 5

Sir. 21:21
It is right, then, for men to repose confidence in their wives, and commit the charge of the household to them, as they are given to be their helpers in this. And if it is necessary for us, while engaged in public business, or discharging other avocations in the country, and often away from our wives, to seal anything for the sake of safety, He (the Word) allows us a signet for this purpose only. Other finger-rings are to be cast off, since, according to the Scripture, "instruction is a golden ornament for a wise man." (Sir. 21:21)  But women who wear gold seem to me to be afraid, lest, if one strip them of their jewellery, they should be taken for servants, without their ornaments. But the nobility of truth, discovered in the native beauty which has its seat in the soul, judges the slave not by buying and selling, but by a servile disposition. And it is incumbent on us not to seem, but to be free, trained by God, adopted by God. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 12

Sir. 22:6
I was so stupefied and dismayed that day and night I could think of nothing but the welfare of the community; it seemed as though I was sharing the captivity of the saints, and I could not open my lips until I knew something more definite; and all the while, full of anxiety, I was wavering between hope and despair, and was torturing myself with the misfortunes of other people. But when the bright light of all the world was put out, or, rather, when the Roman Empire was decapitated, and, to speak more correctly, the whole world perished in one city, "I became dumb and humbled myself, and kept silence from good words, but my grief broke out afresh, my heart glowed within me, and while I meditated the fire was kindled;" (Ps. 39:3-4) and I thought I ought not to disregard the saying,  "An untimely story is like music in a time of grief." (Sir. 22:6) - Bl. Jerome, Preface to the Commentary on Ezekiel

Bl. Jerome, Letter 118: To Julian, 1

Sir. 22:21-22
Let there be no deceit amongst us, no hollowness. For where friendship is, there nothing of the sort is found. This too another certain wise man tells us. "Though thou drewest a sword at thy friend, yet despair not: for there may be a returning again to favor. If thou hast opened thy mouth against thy friend, fear not; for there may be a reconciliation: except for upbraiding, or disclosing of secrets, or a treacherous wound: for for these things a friend will depart." (Sir. 22:21-22) For "disclosing," saith he, "of secrets." Now if we be all friends, there is no need of secrets; for as no man has any secret with himself and cannot conceal anything from himself, so neither will he from his friends. Where then no secrets exist, separation arising from this is impossible. For no other reason have we secrets, than because we have not confidence in all men. So then it is the waxing cold of love, which has produced secrets. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on Ephesians

Sir. 22:25-26
Open thy breast to a friend that he may be faithful to thee, and that thou mayest receive from him the delight of thy life. "For a faithful friend is the medicine of life and the grace of immortality." (Sir. 6:16) Give way to a friend as to an equal, and be not ashamed to be beforehand with thy friend in doing kindly duties. For friendship knows nothing of pride. So the wise man says: "Do not blush to greet a friend." (Sir. 22:25) Do not desert a friend in time of need, nor forsake him nor fail him, for friendship is the support of life. Let us then bear our burdens as the Apostle has taught: (Gal. 6:2) for he spoke to those whom the charity of the same one body had embraced together. If friends in prosperity help friends, why do they not also in times of adversity offer their support? Let us aid by giving counsel, let us offer our best endeavours, let us sympathize with them with all our heart. If necessary, let us endure for a friend even hardship. Often enmity has to be borne for the sake of a friend's innocence; oftentimes revilings, if one defends and answers for a friend who is found fault with and accused. Do not be afraid of such displeasure, for the voice of the just says: "Though evil come upon me, I will endure it for a friend's sake." (Sir. 22:26) In adversity, too, a friend is proved, for in prosperity all seem to be friends. But as in adversity patience and endurance are needed, so in prosperity strong influence is wanted to check and confute the arrogance of a friend who becomes overbearing. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 22

Sir. 22:27
For there is no organ so convenient for him for our deception and our destruction as an unchastened tongue and an unchecked utterance. Hence come many slips on our part: hence many serious accusations against us. And the ease of these falls through the tongue a certain one showed, when he said, "Many fell by the sword, but not so many as by the tongue." (Sir. 28:22) Now the gravity of the fall the same person shows us again when he says: "To slip upon a pavement is better than to slip with the tongue." (Sir. 20:18) And what he speaks of is of this kind. Better it is, says he, that the body should fall and be crushed, than that such a word should go forth as destroys the soul; and he does not speak of falls merely; he also admonishes us that much forethought should be exercised, so that we should not be tripped up, thus saying "Make a door and bars for thy mouth," (Sir. 20:25)  not that we should prepare doors and bars, but that with much security, we should shut the tongue off from outrageous words; and again in another place, after showing that we need influence from above, both as accompanying and preceding our own effort so as to keep this wild beast within: stretching forth his hands to God, the prophet said, "Let the lifting up of my hands be an evening sacrifice, set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth, keep the door of my lips;" and he who before admonished, himself too (Ps. 142:2-3) says again "Who shall set a watch before my mouth, and a seal of wisdom upon my lips?" (Sir. 22:27) - St. John Chrysostom, Instructions to Catechumens, 1

Sir. 22:31
 It gives a very great impetus to mutual love if one shows love in return to those who love us and proves that one does not love them less than oneself is loved, especially if one shows it by the proofs that a faithful friendship gives. What is so likely to win favour as gratitude? What more natural than to love one who loves us? What so implanted and so impressed on men's feelings as the wish to let another, by whom we want to be loved, know that we love him? Well does the wise man say: "Lose thy money for thy brother and thy friend." (Sir. 29:10) And again: "I will not be ashamed to defend a friend, neither will I hide myself from him." (Sir. 22:31) If, indeed, the words in Ecclesiasticus testify that the medicine of life and immortality is in a friend; (Sir. 6:16) yet none has ever doubted that it is in love that our best defence lies. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 7

But if we have found a man that by the vigour of his character, by his strength of mind and influence, stands forth above all others, and further, is better fitted by example and experience than others; that can put an end to immediate dangers, foresee future ones, point out those close at hand, can explain a subject, bring relief in time, is ready not only to give advice but also to give help,--in such a man confidence is placed, so that he who seeks advice can say: "Though evil should happen to me through him, I will bear it." (Sir. 22:31) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 8

Sir. 23:4-5
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10

Sir. 23:10
However, let us put up with that, lest we incur even worse ridicule. Well, then, let us speak to you to-day from the Old Testament. What does it tell us? "Accustom not thy mouth to swearing; neither use thyself to the naming of the Holy One." And why? "For as a servant that is continually beaten shall not be without a blue mark, so he that sweareth." (Sir. 23:10) See the discernment of this wise man. He did not say, "Accustom not to swearing" thy mind, but "thy mouth"; because being altogether an affair of the mouth, thus it is easily remedied. For at last it becomes a habit without intention; as for instance, there are many who entering the public baths, as soon as they have passed the threshold, cross themselves. This the hand has got to do, without any one's bidding, by force of habit. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 10 on Acts

Nevertheless, if it be not possible to spread before the eyes the shameful state of their soul, it may be possible to expose it to the thoughts, and to display it in its rottenness and corruption. For as it saith, "As a servant that is continually beaten will not be clear of a bruise, so he that sweareth and nameth God continually will not be purified of his sin." (Sir. 23:10) It is impossible, utterly impossible, that the mouth which is practised in swearing, should not frequently commit perjury. Therefore, I beseech you all, by laying aside this dreadful and wicked habit, to win another crown. - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 14

Sir. 23:17
Do you not see that drunkards are always thirsty? for it is a passion, not the desire of nature, but some perverted disease. Do you not see how those who are affected with bulimy, as it is called, are always hungry? For it is a passion, as the children of the physicians say, already exceeding the bounds of nature. The busy-bodies, and the over-curious, whatever they have learnt, do not stop. For it is a passion, and has no limit. (Sir. 23:17) Again, they who delight in fornication, they too cannot desist. "To a fornicator," it is said, "all bread is sweet." He will not cease, till he is devoured. For it is a passion. But they are indeed passions, not however incurable, but admitting of cure, and much more than bodily affections. For if we will, we can extinguish them. How then can a man extinguish pride? By knowing God. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 1 on Second Thessalonians

Especially let us train them in chastity, for there is the very bane of youth. For this many struggles, much attention will be necessary. Let us take wives for them early, so that their brides may receive their bodies pure and unpolluted, so their loves will be more ardent. He that is chaste before marriage, much more will he be chaste after it; and he that practiced fornication before, will practice it after marriage. "All bread," it is said, "is sweet to the fornicator." (Sir. 23:17) Garlands are wont to be worn on the heads of bridegrooms, as a symbol of victory, betokening that they approach the marriage bed unconquered by pleasure. But if captivated by pleasure he has given himself up to harlots, why does he wear the garland, since he has been subdued? Let us admonish them of these things. Let us employ sometimes advice, sometimes warnings, sometimes threatening. In children we have a great charge committed to us. Let us bestow great care upon them, and do everything that the Evil One may not rob us of them. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on First Timothy

Sir. 23:18-19
For many think such things to be pleasures only which are against nature, such as these sins of theirs. And those who are better than they, know them to be sins, but are overcome by pleasures, and darkness is the veil of their vicious practices. For he violates his marriage adulterously who uses it in a meretricious way, and hears not the voice of the Instructor, crying, "The man who ascends his bed, who says in his soul, Who seeth me? darkness is around me, and the walls are my covering, and no one sees my sins. Why do I fear lest the Highest will remember?" (Sir. 23:18-19) - Clement of Alexandria, 2, 10

Sir. 23:18
For every one that avoids the light loves darkness, seeking to be hid, though he cannot be hid from God, Who knows not only what is transacted, but also what will be thought of, both in the depths of space and in the minds of men. Thus, again, he who speaks in the book Ecclesiasticus says: "Who seeth me? The darkness hath covered me, and the walls have hidden me; whom do I fear?" (Sir. 23:18) But although lying on his bed he may think thus, he is caught where he never thought of it. "It shall be," it says, "a shame to him because he knew not what the fear of the Lord was." (Sir. 23:31) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 14

Sir. 23:29
We know a brother, whose name we would give if it would do any good, who, although he was remaining in the monastery and compelled to deliver to the steward his fixed task daily, yet for fear lest he might be led on to some larger portion of work, or put to shame by the example of one labouring more zealously, when he had seen some brother admitted into the monastery, who in the ardour of his faith wanted to make up the sale of a larger piece of work, if he found that he could not by secret persuasion check him from carrying out his purpose, he would by bad advice and whisperings persuade him to depart thence. And in order to get rid of him more easily he would pretend that he also had already been for many reasons offended, and wanted to leave, if only he could find a companion and support for the journey. And when by secretly running down the monastery he had wheedled him into consenting, and arranged with him the time at which to leave the monastery, and the place to which he should go before, and where he should wait for him, he himself, pretending that he would follow, stopped where he was. And when the other out of shame for his flight did not dare to return again to the monastery from which he had run away, the miserable author of his flight stopped behind in the monastery. It will be enough to have given this single instance of this sort of men in order to put beginners on their guard, and to show clearly what evils idleness, as Scripture says, (Sir. 23:29) can produce in the mind of a monk, and how "evil communications corrupt good manners." (1 Cor. 15:33) - St. John Cassian, The Institutes, Book 10: Of the Spirit of Accidie, 20

Sir. 23:31
For every one that avoids the light loves darkness, seeking to be hid, though he cannot be hid from God, Who knows not only what is transacted, but also what will be thought of, both in the depths of space and in the minds of men. Thus, again, he who speaks in the book Ecclesiasticus says: "Who seeth me? The darkness hath covered me, and the walls have hidden me; whom do I fear?" (Sir. 23:18) But although lying on his bed he may think thus, he is caught where he never thought of it. "It shall be," it says, "a shame to him because he knew not what the fear of the Lord was." (Sir. 23:31) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 14

Again, good-will contains also in itself fortitude. For when friendship springs from the fount of good-will it does not hesitate to endure the great dangers of life for a friend. "If evils come to me through him," it says, "I will bear them." (Sir. 23:31) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 33
 
Sir. 24:3
So, then, we cannot doubt that the Spirit is Creator, Whom we know as the Author of the Lord's Incarnation. For who can doubt when you find in the commencement of the Gospel that the generation of Jesus Christ was on this wise: "When Mary was espoused to Joseph, before they came together she was found with child of [ex] the Holy Spirit." (Matt. 1:18) For although most authorities read "de Spiritu," yet the Greek from which the Latins translated have "ech pneumatos hagiou," that is, "ex Spiritu Sancto." For that which is "of" [ex] any one is either of his substance or of his power. Of his substance, as the Son, Who says: "I came forth of the Mouth of the Most High;" (Sir. 24:3) as the Spirit, "Who proceedeth from the Father;" (John 15:20) of Whom the Son says: "He shall glorify Me, for He shall receive of Mine." (John 16:14)  - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Holy Spirit, 2, 5

If, then, we enquire into His natural pre-eminence, we find it to consist in being begotten. To deny that the Son of God is begotten [of God] is to deny that He is God's own Son, and to deny Christ to be God's own Son is to class Him with the rest of mankind, as no more a Son than any of the rest. If, however, we enquire into the distinctive property of His generation, it is this, that He came forth from God. For whilst, in our experience, to come out implies something already existent, and that which is said to come out seems to proceed forth from hidden and inward places, we, though it be presented but in short passages, observe the peculiar attribute of the Divine Generation, that the Son doth not seem to have come forth out of any place, but as God from God, a Son from a Father, nor to have had a beginning in the course of time, having come forth from the Father by being born, as He Himself Who was born said: "I came forth from the mouth of the Most High." (Sir. 24:3) - St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 1, 17   

Sir. 24:5
We say, therefore, that it is the function and exercise of His Authority that He has made us sons of God, whereas the oracles of God discover that His generation is in relation to personal attribute, for the Wisdom of God saith: "I came forth out of the mouth of the Most High," (Sir. 24:5) that is to say not of compulsion, but free, not under bond of authority, but born in a hidden birth, according to personal powers of Supreme Sovereignty and rightfulness of authority. Again, concerning the same Wisdom, Which is the Lord Jesus, the Father saith in another place: "Out of the womb I begat Thee, before the morning star." (Ps. 110:3) - St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 4, 8
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« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2009, 06:48:14 PM »

Sirach 25-29

Sir. 25:1
"Wives, be in subjection unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife, as Christ also is the head of the Church: being Himself the Saviour of the body. But as the Church is subject to Christ, so let the wives also be to their husbands in everything." (Eph. 5:22-24) A certain wise man, setting down a number of things in the rank of blessings, set down this also in the rank of a blessing, "A wife agreeing with her husband." (Sir. 25:1) And elsewhere again he sets it down among blessings, that a woman should dwell in harmony with her husband. (Sir. 40:23) And indeed from the beginning, God appears to have made special provision for this union; and discoursing of the twain as one, He said thus, "Male and female created He them" (Gen. 1:27); and again, "There is neither male nor female." (Gal. 3:28) For there is no relationship between man and man so close as that between man and wife, if they be joined together as they should be. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 20 on Ephesians

"To love their husbands."  This is the chief point of all that is good in a household, "A man and his wife that agree together." (Ecclus. xxv. 1.) For where this exists, there will be nothing that is unpleasant. For where the head is in harmony with the body, and there is no disagreement between them, how shall not all the other members be at peace? For when the rulers are at peace, who is there to divide and break up concord? as on the other hand, where these are ill disposed to each other, there will be no good order in the house. This then is a point of the highest importance, and of more consequence than wealth, or rank, or power, or aught else. Nor has he said merely to be at peace, but "to love their husbands." For where love is, no discord will find admittance, far from it, other advantages too spring up. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on Titus

After this he had in them not merely wives, but (devoted) slaves; he was beloved by them: a thing that no possession can equal: for nothing, nothing whatever, is more precious than to be thus loved by a wife and to love her. "And a wife," Scripture says, "that agrees with her husband." (Sir. 25:1) "A man and a wife that agree together." One thing this, as the Wise Man puts it, of the things for which a man is to be counted happy; for where this is, there all wealth, all prosperity abounds: as also, where it is not, there all besides profits nothing, but all goes wrong, all is mere unpleasantness and confusion. Then let us seek this before all things. He that seeks money, seeks not this. Let us seek those things which can remain fixed. Let us not seek a wife from among the rich, lest the excess of wealth on her side produce arrogance, lest that arrogance be the means of marring all. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 49 on Acts

Sir. 25:5
Just as all young men are not alike in fervour of spirit nor equally instructed in learning and good morals, so too we cannot find that all old men are equally perfect and excellent. For the true riches of old men are not to be measured by grey hairs but by their diligence in youth and the rewards of their past labours. "For," says one, "the things that thou hast not gathered in thy youth, how shalt thou find them in thy old age?" "For venerable old age is not that of long time, nor counted by the number of years: but the understanding of a man is grey hairs, and a spotless life is old age." - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 2: Second Conference of Abbot Moses, 13

Sir. 25:6
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 3

Sir. 25:9
The apostle Paul when he appeared before King Agrippa to answer the charges which were brought against him, wishing to use language intelligible to his hearers and confident of the success of his cause, began by congratulating himself in these words: "I think myself happy, King Agrippa, because I shall answer for myself this day before thee touching all the things whereof I am accused by the Jews: especially because thou art expert in all customs and questions which are among the Jews." (Acts 26:2-3) He had read the saying of Jesus [the son of Sirach]:  "Well is him that speaketh in the ears of them that will hear;" (Sir. 25:9) and he knew that a pleader only succeeds in proportion as he impresses his judge. - Bl. Jerome, Letter 57: To Pammachius, 1

St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 2, 50
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 27, 2

Sir. 25:11
If we have the fear of God, we want nothing; if we have not this, though we have royalty itself, we are the poorest of all men. Nothing is like the man that feareth the Lord. For "the fear of the Lord," it is said, "surpasseth all things." (Sir. 25:11) This let us procure; let us do all things for its sake. If need be that we lay down our lives, if our body must be mangled, let us not spare them; let us do all, to obtain this fear. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 3 on Philippians

Sir. 26:8
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2

Sir. 26:9
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 11

Sir. 26:27
If we have hope in God, we shall be in security, and have ample room, and those who bring us into these straits shall perish. For it is written, "Whoso diggeth a pit shall fall therein." (Ecclus. xxvi. 27.) Though they bind our hands and our feet, the affliction will have power to set us loose. For observe this miracle. Those whom men had bound, the fire set free. As if certain persons were delivered up to the servants of their friends, and the servants, from regard to the friendship of their master, instead of injuring them, should treat them with much respect; so the fire, when as it knew that the Three Children were the friends of its Lord, burst their fetters, set them free, and let them go, and became to them as a pavement, and was trodden under their feet. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 6 on Titus

Sir. 26:28
 For who would choose to fatigue himself in vain, if he was not to gain any good from his labor? So then he also who sows words, and tears, and confession, unless he does this with a good hope, will not be able to desist from sinning, being still held down by the evil of despair; but just as that husbandman who despairs of any crop of fruit will not in future hinder any of those things which damage the seeds, so also he who sows his confession with tears, but does not expect any advantage for this, will not be able to overthrow those things which spoil repentance. And what does spoil repentance is being again entangled in the same evils. "For there is one" we read, "who builds, and one who pulls down, what have they gained more than toil? He who is dipped in water because of contact with a dead body, and then touches it again, what has he gained by his washing?" (Sir. 34:24,25) Even so if a man fasts because of his sins, and goes his way again, and doeth the same things, who will hearken to his prayer? And again we read "if a man goes back from righteousness to sin the Lord will prepare him for the sword," (Sir. 26:28) and, "as a dog when he has returned to his vomit, and become odious, so is a fool who by his wickedness has returned to his sin." (Prov. 26:11) - St. John Chrysostom, An Exhortation to Theodore After His Fall, Letter 1

Sir. 27:5
As in good works it is God who brings them to perfection, for it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that pitieth and gives us help that we may be able to reach the goal: so in things wicked and sinful, the seeds within us give the impulse, and these are brought to maturity by the devil. When he sees that we are building upon the foundation of Christ, hay, wood, stubble, then he applies the match. Let us then build gold, silver, costly stones, and he will not venture to tempt us: although even thus there is not sure and safe possession. For the lion lurks in ambush to slay the innocent. (Sir. 27:5) "Potters' vessels are proved by the furnace, and just men by the trial of tribulation." And in another place it is written:  "My son, when thou comest to serve the Lord, prepare thyself for temptation." (Sir. 2:1) Again, the same James says: "Be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only. For if any one is a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is like unto a man beholding his natural face in a mirror: for he beholdeth himself, and goeth away, and straightway forgetteth what manner of man he was." (James 1:22) - Bl. Jerome, Against Jovinianus, 2, 3

Seest thou that for this end our eye was chiefly given? Again, he made the ear that we should entertain not blasphemous words, but saving doctrines. Wherefore you see, when it receives any thing dissonant, both our soul shudders and our very body also. "For," saith one, (Sir. 27:5) "the talk of him that sweareth much maketh the hair stand upright." And if we hear any thing cruel or merciless, again our flesh creeps; but if any thing decorous and kind, we even exult and rejoice. Again, if our mouth utter base words, it causes us to be ashamed and hide ourselves, but if grave words, it utters them with ease and all freedom. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 22 on First Corinthians

Sir. 27:11
But of those who shift about according to the character and changes of the several chances which happen to them, we read: "But a fool will change like the moon." (Sir. 27:11) For just as it is said of men who are perfect and wise: "To them that love God all things work together for good," (Rom. 8:28) so of those who are weak and foolish it is declared that "everything is against a foolish man," (Prov. 14:7) for he gets no profit out of prosperity, nor does adversity make him any better.  - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 6: The Conference of Abbot Theodore, 9

St. Basil, Hexameron, 6, 10

Sir. 27:12
Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 5, 3
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 7: To Peter, Domitian, and Elpidius

Sir. 27:25
It sometimes happens that an arrow when it is aimed at a hard object rebounds upon the bowman, wounding the would-be wounder, and thus, the words are fulfilled, "they were turned aside like a deceitful bow," (Ps. 128:57) and in another passage: "whoso casteth a stone on high casteth it on his own head." (Sir. 27:25) So when a slanderer sees anger in the countenance of his hearer who will not hear him but stops his ears that he may not hear of blood, (Is. 33:15) he becomes silent on the moment, his face turns pale, his lips stick fast, his mouth becomes parched. - Bl. Jerome, Letter 125: To Rusticus, 19

Sir. 28:3
Next not being angry with any one, not bearing malice; the forgiving all their trespasses. For, it is said, "Man retaineth wrath against man, and yet seeketh healing from the Lord." (Sir. 28:3) "Forgive that ye may be forgiven." (Mark 11:25) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on Hebrews

Why then do we imitate the mad, devouring one another, warring against our own flesh? Hear even under the Old Testament, how great regard there was for this, "The ways of revengeful men are unto death." (Prov. 12:28) One man keepeth anger against another, and doth he seek healing of God?" (Sir. 28:3) "And yet He allowed, `eye for eye,' and `tooth for tooth,' how then doth He find fault?" Because He allowed even those things, not that we should do them one to another, but that through the fear of suffering, we might abstain from the commission of crime. And besides, those acts are the fruits of a short-lived anger, but to remember injuries is the part of a soul that practises itself in evil. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 79 on Matthew

Sir. 28:6
It is not possible that a soul anxious about hell should readily sin. For hear the most excellent advice, "Remember," it says, "thy latter end" (Sir. 28:6), and thou wilt not sin for ever. A soul that is fearful of giving account cannot but be slow to transgression. For fear being vigorous in the soul does not permit anything worldly to exist in it. For if discourse raised concerning hell so humbles and brings it low, does not the reflection constantly dwelling upon the soul purify it more than any fire? Let us not remember the kingdom so much as hell. For fear has more power than the promise. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Second Thessalonians

Sir. 28:22
For there is no organ so convenient for him for our deception and our destruction as an unchastened tongue and an unchecked utterance. Hence come many slips on our part: hence many serious accusations against us. And the ease of these falls through the tongue a certain one showed, when he said, "Many fell by the sword, but not so many as by the tongue." (Sir. 28:22) Now the gravity of the fall the same person shows us again when he says: "To slip upon a pavement is better than to slip with the tongue." (Sir. 20:18) And what he speaks of is of this kind. Better it is, says he, that the body should fall and be crushed, than that such a word should go forth as destroys the soul; and he does not speak of falls merely; he also admonishes us that much forethought should be exercised, so that we should not be tripped up, thus saying "Make a door and bars for thy mouth," (Sir. 20:25)  not that we should prepare doors and bars, but that with much security, we should shut the tongue off from outrageous words; and again in another place, after showing that we need influence from above, both as accompanying and preceding our own effort so as to keep this wild beast within: stretching forth his hands to God, the prophet said, "Let the lifting up of my hands be an evening sacrifice, set a watch, O Lord, before my mouth, keep the door of my lips;" and he who before admonished, himself too (Ps. 142:2-3) says again "Who shall set a watch before my mouth, and a seal of wisdom upon my lips?" (Sir. 22:27) - St. John Chrysostom, Instructions to Catechumens, 1

Sir. 28:24-25
But for whom was it written, unless it was for each one of us: "Hedge thy possession about with thorns, and bind up thy silver and gold, and make a door and a bar for thy mouth, and a yoke and a balance for thy words"? (Sir. 28:24-25) Thy possession is thy mind, thy gold thy heart, thy silver thy speech: "The words of the Lord are pure words, as silver tried in the fire." (Ps. 12:6) A good mind is also a good possession. And, further, a pure inner life is a valuable possession. Hedge in, then, this possession of thine, enclose it with thought, guard it with thorns, that is, with pious care, lest the fierce passions of the flesh should rush upon it and lead it captive, lest strong emotions should assault it, and, overstepping their bounds, carry off its vintage. Guard thy inner self. Do not neglect or contemn it as though it were worthless, for it is a valuable possession; truly valuable indeed, for its fruit is not perishable and only for a time, but is lasting and of use for eternal salvation. Cultivate, therefore, thy possession, and let it be thy tilling ground. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 3

Sir. 28:28
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 1, 6

Sir. 29:10
 It gives a very great impetus to mutual love if one shows love in return to those who love us and proves that one does not love them less than oneself is loved, especially if one shows it by the proofs that a faithful friendship gives. What is so likely to win favour as gratitude? What more natural than to love one who loves us? What so implanted and so impressed on men's feelings as the wish to let another, by whom we want to be loved, know that we love him? Well does the wise man say: "Lose thy money for thy brother and thy friend." (Sir. 29:10) And again: "I will not be ashamed to defend a friend, neither will I hide myself from him." (Sir. 22:31) If, indeed, the words in Ecclesiasticus testify that the medicine of life and immortality is in a friend; (Sir. 6:16) yet none has ever doubted that it is in love that our best defence lies. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 7

Sir. 29:15
As to the alms which you have bestowed on the monastery of the blessed  Apostle Andrew, there is no need for me to say anything, since it is  written, Hide thine alms in the bosom of a poor man, and it shall pray  for thee (Sir. 29:15).  If then the good deed itself has its  voice in the secret ears of God, whether we cry aloud or keep silence,  this very thing which you have well done cries aloud.  - Gregory the Great, Epistles, Book 11, Epistle 44: To Rusticiana

That there are different reasons for prayer being heard in accordance with the varied and changing condition of souls the words of the gospels and of the prophets teach us... You have it in the fruits of almsgiving: "Shut up alms in the heart of the poor and it shall pray for thee in the time of tribulation." - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 9: The First Conference of Abbot Isaac, 34

As to what you say you desire to be done for you near the most sacred body of the holy apostle Peter, be assured that, though your tongue were silent, your charity bids the doing of it.  Would indeed that we were worthy to pray for you:  but that I am not worthy I have no doubt.  Still, however, there are here many worthy folk, who are being redeemed from the enemy by your offering, and serve our Creator faithfully, with regard to whom you have done what is written; Lay up alms in the bosom of the poor, and it shall pray for thee (Sir. 29:15). But, since he loves the more who presumes the more, I have some complaint against the most sweet disposition of my most glorious son the Lord Theodorus; namely that he has received from the holy Trinity the gift of genius, the gift of wealth, the gift of mercy and charity, and yet is unceasingly bound up in secular causes, is occupied in continual processions, and neglects to read daily the words of his Redeemer.  For what is sacred Scripture but a kind of epistle of Almighty God to His creature? - St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 31: To Theodorus

St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 28: To Theodore

Sir. 29:18
Aphraates, Demonstration 22
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« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2009, 06:48:42 PM »

Sirach 30-51

Sir. 30:4
St. Athanasius, Defense Against the Arians, 5

Sir. 30:7
"For whosoever will save his life shall lose it," saith He, "but whosoever shall lose his life for my sake, shall find it. For what is a man profited, if he should gain the whole world, and lose his own soul? Or what shall a man give in exchange for his soul ?" (Matt. 16:25-26) Now what He saith is like this: "not as unsparing towards you, but rather as exceedingly sparing you, I enjoin these things. For he who spares his child, ruins it; but he who spares it not, preserves." To which effect also a certain wise man said, "If thou beat thy son with a rod, he shall not die, but thou shalt deliver his soul from death." (Prov. 23:13-14) And again, "He that refresheth his son, shall bind up his wounds." (Sir. 30:7) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 55 on Matthew

Sir. 30:8
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9

Sir. 31:1
For worse than any burning does the bitterness of grief afflict our souls. And as the body, when parched and worn down by struggling against the violence of the sunbeams, is brought to a caravansary with many fountains, and the soothing of a gentle breeze, so does night hand over our soul to sleep. Yea, rather, I should say, not night nor sleep does this, but God, who knoweth our toil-worn race, has wrought this, while we have no compassion on ourselves, but, as though at enmity with ourselves, have devised a tyranny more powerful than natural want of rest--the sleeplessness which comes of wealth. For it is said, "The anxieties of wealth drive away sleep." (Sir. 31:1) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Philippians

Sir. 31:9
Prudence, therefore, works through all things, she has fellowship with all that is good. For how can she give good advice unless she have justice too, so that she may clothe herself in consistency, not fear death, be held back by no alarm, no fear, nor think it right to be turned aside from the truth by any flattery, nor shun exile, knowing that the world is the fatherland of the wise man. She fears not want, for she knows that nothing is wanting to the wise man, since the whole world of riches is his. What is greater than the man that knows not how to be excited at the thought of money, and has a contempt for riches, and looks down as from some lofty vantage-ground on the desires of men? Men think that one who acts thus is more than man: "Who is this," it says, "and we will praise him. For wonderful things hath he done in his life." (Sir. 31:9) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 14

Sir. 31:16-18
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 31:19
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2

Sir. 31:20
But the evils arising from luxurious living, how many and great they are, none can be ignorant: it is necessary, however, to mention them now. Twofold the war, in the body, and in the soul: twofold the storm: twofold the diseases; not only in this respect, but because they are both incurable, and bring with them great calamities. Not so, frugality: but here is twofold health, twofold the benefits. "Sleep of health," we read, "is in moderate eating." (Sir. 31:20) For everywhere, that which keeps measure is pleasant, that which is beyond measure, ceases to please. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 16 on Acts

Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2

Sir. 31:25
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2

Sir. 31:26
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2

Sir. 31:27
It is fitting, then, that some apply wine by way of physic, for the sake of health alone, and others for purposes of relaxation and enjoyment. For first wine makes the man who has drunk it more benignant than before, more agreeable to his boon companions, kinder to his domestics, and more pleasant to his friends. But when intoxicated, he becomes violent instead. For wine being warm, and having sweet juices when duly mixed, dissolves the foul excrementitious matters by its warmth, and mixes the acrid and base humours with the agreeable scents. It has therefore been well said, "A joy of the soul and heart was wine created from the beginning, when drunk in moderate sufficiency." (Sir. 31:27) And it is best to mix the wine with as much water as possible, and not to have recourse to it as to water, and so get enervated to drunkenness, and not pour it in as water from love of wine. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2

Sir. 31:29
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2

Sir. 31:31
Let us keep away from us jibing, the originator of insult, from which strifes and contentions and enmities burst forth. Insult, we have said, is the servant of drunkenness. A man is judged, not from his deeds alone, but from his words. "In a banquet," it is said, "reprove not thy neighbour, nor say to him a word of reproach." (Sir. 31:31) For if we are enjoined especially to associate with saints, it is a sin to jibe at a saint: "For from the mouth of the foolish," says the Scripture, "is a staff of insult," (Prov. 14:3)--meaning by staff the prop of insult, on which insult leans and rests. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 32:1
Therefore let those who preside study without intermission that in proportion as their power is seen to be great externally it be kept down within themselves internally; that it vanquish not their thought; that the heart be not carried away to delight in it; lest the mind become unable to control that which in lust of domination it submits itself to.  For, lest the heart of a ruler should be betrayed into elation by delight in personal power, it is rightly said by a certain wise man They have made thee a leader:  "lift not up thyself, but be among them as one of them" (Sir. 32:1).  Hence also Peter says, "Not as being lords over God's heritage, but being made ensamples to the flock" (1 Pet. 5:3). - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 2, 6

Sir. 32:3
 What more?  Are you living in Virginity?  Be sealed by this purification; make this the sharer and companion of your life.  Let this direct your life, your words, every member, every movement, every sense.  Honour it, that it may honour you; that it may give to your head a crown of graces, and with a crown of delights may shield you. (Sir. 32:3)  Art thou bound by wedlock?  Be bound also by the Seal; make it dwell with you as a guardian of your continence, safer than any number of eunuchs or of doorkeepers.  Art thou not yet wedded to flesh?  Fear not this consecration; thou art pure even after marriage.  I will take the risk of that.  I will join you in wedlock. I will dress the bride.  We do not dishonour marriage because we give a higher honour to virginity.  I will imitate Christ, the pure Grooms-man and Bridegroom, as He both wrought a miracle at a wedding, and honours wedlock with His Presence. - St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 40, 18

Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 32:4
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 32:8
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 32:10
If there be any one who has lost respect, if there be any vile person, that man is also a jester. To many indeed the thing appears to be even a virtue, and this truly calls for our sorrow. Just as lust by little and little drives headlong into fornication, so also does a turn for jesting. It seems to have a grace about it, yet there is nothing more graceless than this. For hear the Scripture which says, "Before the thunder goeth lightning, and before a shamefaced man shall go favor." (Sir. 32:10) Now there is nothing more shameless than the jester; so that his mouth is not full of favor, but of pain. Let us banish this custom from our tables. Yet are there some who teach it even to the poor! O monstrous! they make men in affliction play the jester. Why, where shall not this pest be found next? Already has it been brought into the Church itself. Already has it laid hold of the very Scriptures. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 17 on Ephesians

"For a contrite spirit is a sacrifice to God." (Ps. 51:17) This is the mother of wisdom. If a man have this, he will have the rest also. Hast thou seen a head such as thou hadst never seen? Wilt thou see the face too, or rather mark it? Mark then for the present its color, how ruddy, and blooming, and very engaging; and observe what are its ingredients. "Well, and what are they?" Shame-facedness and blushing. Wherefore also some one saith, "Before a shamefaced man shall go favor." (Sir. 32:10) This sheds much beauty over the other members also. Though thou mix ten thousand colors, thou wilt not produce such a bloom. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 47 on Matthew

St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 25
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 18: To John

Sir. 32:11
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7

Sir. 32:20
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 14: The First Conference of Abbot Nesteros, 16

Sir. 32:21
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9

Sir. 32:24
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 15

Sir. 33:6
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 13

Sir. 33:29
 But these proofs are (as it were) rags, from the solid piece of the gospel, which are adopted for this purpose, viz., to cover the disgrace of our idleness and shame rather than to keep us warm, and adorn us with that costly and splendid garment of virtue which that wise woman in the Proverbs, who was clothed with strength and beauty, is said to have made either for herself or for her husband; of which presently it is said: "Strength and beauty are her clothing, and she rejoices in the latter days." (Prov. 31:25) Of this evil of idleness Solomon thus makes mention again: "The ways of the idlers are strewn with thorns;" (Prov. 15:19) i.e., with these and similar faults, which the Apostle above declared to spring from idleness. And again: "Every sluggard is always in want." (Prov. 13:4) And of these the Apostle makes mention when he says, "And that you want nothing of any man's." (1 Thes. 4:11) And finally: "For idleness has been the teacher of many evils:" (Sir. 33:29) which the Apostle has clearly enumerated in the passage which he expounded above: "Working not at all, but curiously meddling." - St. John Cassian, The Institutes, Book 10: Of the Spirit of Accidie, 21

Sir. 34:11
Next there follows: "And lead us not into temptation," on which there arises no unimportant question, for if we pray that we may not be suffered to be tempted, how then will our power of endurance be proved, according to this text: "Every one who is not tempted is not proved;" (Sir. 34:11) and again: "Blessed is the man that endureth temptation?" (James 1:12) The clause then, "Lead us not into temptation," does not mean this; viz., do not permit us ever to be tempted, but do not permit us when we fall into temptation to be overcome. For Job was tempted, but was not led into temptation. For he did not ascribe folly to God nor blasphemy, nor with impious mouth did he yield to that wish of the tempter toward which he was drawn. Abraham was tempted, Joseph was tempted, but neither of them was led into temptation for neither of them yielded his consent to the tempter. Next there follows: "But deliver us from evil," i.e., do not suffer us to be tempted by the devil above that we are able, but "make with the temptation a way also of escape that we may be able to bear it." (1 Cor. 10:13) - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 9: The First Conference of Abbot Isaac, 23

Sir. 34:14-15
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8

Sir. 34:15-16
And as it is befitting, before partaking of food, that we should bless the Creator of all; so also in drinking it is suitable to praise Him on partaking of His creatures. For the psalm is a melodious and sober blessing. The apostle calls the psalm "a spiritual song." (Eph. 5:19; Col. 3:16)  Finally, before partaking of sleep, it is a sacred duty to give thanks to God, having enjoyed His grace and love, and so go straight to sleep. "And confess to Him in songs of the lips," he says, "because in His command all His good pleasure is done, and there is no deficiency in His salvation." (Sir. 34:15-16) - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 4 

Sir. 34:20
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 21

Sir. 34:22 
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 25 on Hebrews

Sir. 34:23-25
 For who would choose to fatigue himself in vain, if he was not to gain any good from his labor? So then he also who sows words, and tears, and confession, unless he does this with a good hope, will not be able to desist from sinning, being still held down by the evil of despair; but just as that husbandman who despairs of any crop of fruit will not in future hinder any of those things which damage the seeds, so also he who sows his confession with tears, but does not expect any advantage for this, will not be able to overthrow those things which spoil repentance. And what does spoil repentance is being again entangled in the same evils. "For there is one" we read, "who builds, and one who pulls down, what have they gained more than toil? He who is dipped in water because of contact with a dead body, and then touches it again, what has he gained by his washing?" (Sir. 34:24,25) Even so if a man fasts because of his sins, and goes his way again, and doeth the same things, who will hearken to his prayer? And again we read "if a man goes back from righteousness to sin the Lord will prepare him for the sword," (Sir. 26:28) and, "as a dog when he has returned to his vomit, and become odious, so is a fool who by his wickedness has returned to his sin." (Prov. 26:11) - St. John Chrysostom, An Exhortation to Theodore After His Fall, Letter 1

Sir. 34:23
For if he that hath sinned perceives that he was rebuked indeed by his father, but flattered by his brethren; he becometh more easy of mind. But when the father rebukes, be thou too angry as well, whether as concerned for thy brother or as joining in thy father's indignation; only be the earnestness thou showest great; and mourn, not that he was rebuked, but that he sinned. But if I build up and thou pull down, what profit have we had but labor? (Sir. 34:23) Yea, rather, thy loss stops not here, but thou bringest also punishment on thyself. For he that hindereth the wound from being healed is punished not less than he that inflicted it, but even more. For it is not an equal offence to wound and to hinder that which is wounded from being healed; for this indeed necessarily gendereth death, but that not necessarily. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 14 on Second Corinthians

Sir. 34:24
That we should not, then,  try to get anything with sin under pretence of almsgiving we are  plainly warned by Holy Scripture, which says, The sacrifices of the  impious are abominable which are offered of wickedness (Prov. 21:27).  For whatever in God's sacrifice is offered of wickedness  appeases not, but provokes, the anger of Almighty God.  Hence again it  is written, Honour the Lord from thy just labours (Prov. 3:9).  Whoso, then, takes evilly that he may, as he supposes, give well, it  is evident without doubt that he honours not the Lord.  Hence also it  is said through Solomon, Whoso offers a sacrifice of the substance of  the poor is as though he slew a son in his father's sight (Sir. 34:24). - Gregory the Great, Epistles, Book 9, Epistle 106: To Syagrius, Ætherius, Virgilius, and Desiderius

As then a stone cannot yield oil, so neither can cruelty produce humanity; for alms when it has such a root as this is alms no longer. Therefore I exhort that we look not to this only, that we give to those that need, but also that we give not from other men's plunder. "When one prayeth, and another curseth, whose voice will the Lord hear?" (Sir. 34:24) If we guide ourselves thus strictly, we shall be able by the grace of God to obtain much lovingkindness and mercy and pardon for what we have done amiss during all this long time, and to escape the river of fire; from which may it come to pass that we be all delivered, and ascend to the Kingdom of Heaven, through the grace and lovingkindness of our Lord Jesus Christ. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 13 on John

Sir. 34:30
Now they are in the flesh who live in carnal pleasures.  Against them  it is said, Neither shall corruption possess incorruption (1 Cor. 15:50).  But, if they say that a short season of penitence may suffice  against sin, so that one may be allowed to return again to sin,  rightly does the sentence of the first pastor hit them, when he says,  It is happened unto them according to the true proverb; The dog is  turned to his own vomit again, and the sow that was washed to her  wallowing in the mire (2 Pet. ii. 22).  For great is the efficacy of  penitence against sin; but only if one persevere in this penitence.  For it is written, He that shall persevere unto the end, the same  shall be saved (Matt. 10:22; 24:13).  Hence again it is written,  He that is baptized from a dead body, and toucheth it again, what  availeth his washing? (Sir. 34:30).  Now a dead body is  every perverse work, which draws a man to death, because he lives not  in the life of righteousness.  He, then, is baptized from a dead body,  and again touches it, who deplores the bad works which he remembers  having done, but after his tears entangles himself in the same again.  Washing, therefore, from such dead body avails not any soul that does  again what it has bemoaned, and rises not through the lamentations of  penitence to the rectitude of righteousness.  For to do penance truly  is not only to bemoan what has been committed, but also to decline  from what has been bemoaned. - St. Gregory the Great, Epistles, Book 11, Epistle 45: To Theoctista

And one who mourns past transgressions, yet forsakes them not, subjects himself to the penalty of more grievous sin, since he both despises the very pardon which he might have won by his weeping, and as it were rolls himself in miry water; because in withholding purity of life from his weeping he makes even his very tears filthy before the eyes of God.  Hence again it is written, "Repeat not a word in thy prayer" (Sir. 7:14).  For to repeat a word in prayer is, after bewailing, to commit what again requires bewailing.  Hence it is said through Isaiah, "Wash you, be ye clean" (Is. 1:16).  For he neglects being clean after washing, whosoever after tears keeps not innocency of life.  And they therefore are washed, but are in no wise clean, who cease not to bewail the things they have committed, but commit again things to be bewailed.  Hence through a certain wise man it is said, "He that is baptized from the touch of a dead body and toucheth it again, what availeth his washing" (Sir. 34:30)? - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 30

Sir. 38:1-2, 8
Rubbing one's self with ointment is entirely different from anointing one's self with ointment. The former is effeminate, while anointing with ointment is in some cases beneficial. Aristippus the philosopher, accordingly, when anointed with ointment, said "that the wretched Cinoedi deserved to perish miserably for bringing the utility of ointment into bad repute." "Honour the physician for his usefulness," says the Scripture, "for the Most High made him; and the art of healing is of the Lord." Then he adds, "And the compounder of unguents will make the mixture," (Sir. 38) since unguents have been given manifestly for use, not for voluptuousness. For we are by no means to care for the exciting properties of unguents, but to choose what is useful in them, since God hath permitted the production of oil for the mitigation of men's pains. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 8

Sir. 38:16
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 7, 1

Sir. 39:13-14
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 8

Sir. 39:16
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 23:The Third Conference of Abbot Theonas, 3

Sir. 39:26-27
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 8

Sir. 40:23
"Wives, be in subjection unto your own husbands, as unto the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife, as Christ also is the head of the Church: being Himself the Saviour of the body. But as the Church is subject to Christ, so let the wives also be to their husbands in everything." (Eph. 5:22-24) A certain wise man, setting down a number of things in the rank of blessings, set down this also in the rank of a blessing, "A wife agreeing with her husband." (Sir. 25:1) And elsewhere again he sets it down among blessings, that a woman should dwell in harmony with her husband. (Sir. 40:23) And indeed from the beginning, God appears to have made special provision for this union; and discoursing of the twain as one, He said thus, "Male and female created He them" (Gen. 1:27); and again, "There is neither male nor female." (Gal. 3:28) For there is no relationship between man and man so close as that between man and wife, if they be joined together as they should be. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 20 on Ephesians

Sir. 41:22
Hermas, The Shepherd, Ninth Similitude, 24

Sir. 42:9
St. John Chrysostom, Treatise on the Priesthood, 3

Sir. 43:11
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 8

Sir. 43:30
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 28

Sir. 44:17
St. John Chrysostom, Homilies On the Statues, 6

Sir. 45:12
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 22, 7

Sir. 47:23
St. Ambrose, Two Books Concerning Repentance, 2, 5

Sir. 49:14
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 28, 18

Sir. 50:24
At any rate, although this has nothing to do with the question raised, yet I think that I ought not to omit the fact that very often our elders used to testify that especially on these days the whole body of monks was attacked according to the ancient custom of the people opposed to them, and was more vehemently urged to forsake their homes, for this reason, because in accordance with this figure, whereby the Egyptians formerly oppressed the children of Israel with grievous afflictions, so now also the spiritual Egyptians try to bow down the true Israel, i.e., the monastic folk, with hard and vile tasks, lest by means of that peace which is dear to God, we should forsake the land of Egypt, and for our good cross to the desert of virtues, so that Pharaoh rages against us and says: "They are idle and therefore they cry saying: Let us go and sacrifice to the Lord our God. Let them be oppressed with labours, and be harassed in their works, and they shall not be harassed by vain words." (Ex. 5:8-9) For certainly their folly imagines that the holy sacrifice of the Lord, which is only offered in the desert of a pure heart, is the height of folly, for "religion is an abomination to a sinner." (Sir. 50:24) -  St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 21: The First Conference of Abbot Theonas, 28

Sir. 51:8
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Acts
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« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2009, 06:50:01 PM »

Susanna

St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 2, 64
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 41, 14
St. Ignatius, Epistle to the Magnesians, 3

Sus. 23
Holy Susanna, too, when threatened with the fear of false witness, seeing herself hard pressed on one side by danger, on the other by disgrace, preferred to avoid disgrace by a virtuous death rather than to endure and live a shameful life in the desire to save herself. (Sus. 5:23) So while she fixed her mind on virtue, she also preserved her life. But if she had preferred what seemed to her to be useful to preserve life, she would never have gained such great renown, nay, perhaps--and that would have been not only useless but even dangerous--she might even not have escaped the penalty for her crime. We note, therefore, that whatsoever is shameful cannot be useful, nor, again, can that which is virtuous be useless. For usefulness is ever the double of virtue, and virtue of usefulness. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 14

Sus. 35
If, then, we are to give account for an idle word, let us take care that we do not have to give it also for an idle silence. For there is also an active silence, such as Susanna's was, who did more by keeping silence than if she had spoken. For in keeping silence before men she spoke to God, and found no greater proof of her chastity than silence. Her conscience spoke where no word was heard, and she sought no judgment for herself at the hands of men, for she had the witness of the Lord. She therefore desired to be acquitted by Him, Who she knew could not be deceived in any way. (Sus. 5:35) - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 3

Silence, again, wherein all the other virtues rest, is the chief act of modesty. Only, if it is supposed to be a sign of a childish or proud spirit, it is accounted a reproach; if a sign of modesty, it is reckoned for praise. Susanna was silent in danger, [116] and thought the loss of modesty was worse than loss of life. She did not consider that her safety should be guarded at the risk of her chastity. To God alone she spoke, to Whom she could speak out in true modesty. She avoided looking on the face of men. For there is also modesty in the glance of the eye, which makes a woman unwilling to look upon men, or to be seen by them. - St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 18

Sus. 42
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On the Making of Man, 16, 14
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On the Making of Man, 22, 3
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On the Making of Man, 29, 1
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 4

Sus. 44-46
Daniel also, unless he had received the Spirit of God, would never have been able to discover that lustful adultery, that fraudulent lie. For when Susanna, assailed by the conspiracy of the elders, saw that the mind of the people was moved by consideration for the old men, and destitute of all help, alone amongst men, conscious of her chastity she prayed God to judge; it is written: "The Lord heard her voice, when she was being led to be put to death, and the Lord raised up the Holy Spirit of a young youth, whose name was Daniel." (Sus. 44-45) And so according to the grace of the Holy Spirit received by him, he discovered the varying evidence of the treacherous, for it was none other than the operation of divine power, that his voice should make them whose inward feelings were concealed to be known. - St. Ambrose, On the Holy Spirit, 3, 6

Susanna knelt down for punishment and triumphed over her adulterous accusers, (Sus. 45) the right hand withered which violated the gifts of Thy temple; (1 Kings 13:4) and now thy temple itself is violated; suffer not sacrilegious incest, Thou Who didst not suffer theft. Let Thy Name be now again glorified in that I who came here for shame, may go away a virgin!" Scarcely had she finished her prayer, when, lo! a man with the aspect of a terrible warrior burst in. How the virgin trembled before him to whom the trembling people gave way. But she did not forget what she had read. "Daniel," said she, "had gone to see the punishment of Susanna, and alone pronounced her guiltless, (Sus. 46) whom the people had condemned. A sheep may be hidden in the shape of this wolf. - St. Ambrose, Concerning Virgins, 2, 4

He endued with wisdom the soul of Daniel, that young as he was he should become a judge of Elders.  The chaste Susanna was condemned as a wanton; there was none to plead her cause; for who was to deliver her from the rulers?  She was led away to death, she was now in the hands of the executioners.  But her Helper was at hand, the Comforter, the Spirit who sanctifies every rational nature.  - St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 16, 31

Sus. 45
Bl. Jerome, Letter 1:To Innocent, 8

Sus. 52
St. Ignatius, Epistle to the Magnesians, 3

Sus. 56
St. Ireneaus, Against Heresies, 4, 26
St. Leo the Great, Sermon 67, 4

Sus. 63
The training of the Church is rich in this, that it has those whom it may set before others, but has none whom it rejects, and would that it never could have any! We have so spoken of virginity as not to reject widowhood, we so reverence widows as to reserve its own honour for wedlock. It is not our precepts but the divine sayings which teach this. Let us remember then how Mary, how Anna, and how Susanna are spoken of. But since not only must we celebrate their praises but also follow their manner of life, let us remember where Susanna, (Sus. 63) and Anna, (Luke 2:37) and Mary (Luke 1:28) are found, and observe how each is spoken of with her special commendation, and where each is mentioned, she that is married in the garden, the widow in the temple, the virgin in her secret chamber. - St. Ambrose, Treatise Concerning Widows, 4
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« Reply #12 on: November 17, 2009, 06:50:32 PM »

Song of the Three Children

St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 9, 2
Bl. Jerome, Letter 1:To Innocent, 9
Bl. Jerome, Letter 54:To Furia, 10
Bl. Jerome, Letter 79:To Salvina, 2
Bl. Jerome, Letter 130:To Demetrias, 10
Bl. Jerome, The Life of St. Hilarion, 14
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 12 on John
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 26 on Hebrews
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 6 on Titus
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 11 on Colossians
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on First Corinthians
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 18 on First Corinthians
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 1 on Second Corinthians
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 5 on Second Corinthians
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 26 on Second Corinthians
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 54 on Acts
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 9 on Romans
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 10 on Romans
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 20 on Romans
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 33 on Matthew
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 36 on Matthew
St. John Chrysostom, Concerning the Power of Demons, 1
St. John Chrysostom, Commentary on Rom. 12:20
St. John Chrysostom, Homily Against Publishing Errors of the Brethren
St. John Chrysostom, No Man can Harm the Man Who Does Not Harm Himself
St. John Chrysostom, Letters to Olympias, 1
St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 1
St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 4
St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 6
St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 7
St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 10
St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 18
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 1, 21
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« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2009, 06:50:59 PM »

Tobit 1-6
Tobit 1:7
In those days there was a man in Jerusalem, Joachim by name, of the tribe of Judah. He was the shepherd of his own sheep, fearing the Lord in integrity and singleness of heart. He had no other care than that of his herds, from the produce of which he supplied with food all that feared God, offering double gifts in the fear of God to all who laboured in doctrine, and who ministered unto Him. Therefore his lambs, and his sheep, and his wool, and all things whatsoever he possessed, he used to divide into three portions: one he gave to the orphans, the widows, the strangers, and the poor; the second to those that worshipped God; and the third he kept for himself and all his house. And as he did so, the Lord multiplied to him his herds, so that there was no man like him in the people of Israel. This now he began to do when he was fifteen years old. And at the age of twenty he took to wife Anna, the daughter of Achar, of his own tribe, that is, of the tribe of Judah, of the family of David. And though they had lived together for twenty years, he had by her neither sons nor daughters. - Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew, 1

Tobit 1:12-22
Where you get your lost and won at play, and thrown out unburied on the streets," I know not, unless it is from Tobias; and Tobias (as also Judith), we ought to notice, the Jews do not use. They are not even found in the Hebrew Apocrypha, as I learned from the Jews themselves." However, since the Churches use Tobias, you must know that even in the captivity some of the captives were rich and well to do. Tobias himself says, "Because I remembered God with all my heart; and the Most High gave me grace and beauty in the eyes of Nemessarus, and I was his purveyor; and I went into Media, and left in trust with Gabael, the brother of Gabrias, at Ragi, a city of Media, ten talents of silver."And he adds, as if he were a rich man, "In the days of Nemessarus I gave many alms to my brethren. I gave my bread to the hungry, and my clothes to the naked: and if I saw any of my nation dead, and cast outside the walls of Nineve, I buried him; and if king Senachereim had slain any when he came fleeing from Judea, I buried them privily (for in his wrath he killed many)." Think whether this great catalogue of Tobias's good deeds does not betoken great wealth and much property, especially when he adds, "Understanding that I was sought for to be put to death, I withdrew myself for fear, and all my goods were forcibly taken away." And another captive, Dachiacharus, the son of Ananiel, the brother of Tobias, was set over all the exchequer of the kingdom of king Acherdon; and we read, "Now Achiacharus was cup-bearer and keeper of the signet, and steward and overseer of the accounts." - Origen, Letter To Africanus, 13

Tobit 1:17-18
I am Joseph of Arimathaea, who begged from Pilate the body of the Lord Jesus for burial, and who for this cause was kept close in prison by the murderous and God-fighting Jews, who also, keeping to the law, have by Moses himself become partakers in tribulation and having provoked their Lawgiver to anger, and not knowing that He was God, crucified Him and made Him manifest to those that knew God. in those days in which they condemned the Son of God to be crucified, seven days before Christ suffered, two condemned robbers were sent from Jericho to the procurator Pilate; and their case was as follows:- The first, his name Gestas, put travellers to death, murdering them with the sword, and others he exposed naked. And he hung up women by the heels, head down, and cut off their breasts, and drank the blood of infants limbs, never having known God, not obeying the laws, being violent from the beginning, and doing such deeds. And the case of the other was as follows: He was called Demas, and was by birth a Galilaean, and kept an inn. He made attacks upon the rich, but was good to the poor-a thief like Tobit, for he buried the bodies of the poor. And he set his hand to robbing the multitude of the Jews, and stole the law itself in Jerusalem, and stripped naked the daughter of Caiaphas, who was priestess of the sanctuary, and took away from its place the mysterious deposit itself placed there by Solomon. Such were his doings. - The Narrative of Joseph, 1

Tobit 2:2
If thou seest the naked, clothe him; and despise not them of thy own seed in thy house. Then shall thy seasonable light break forth, and thy garments shall quickly arise; and righteousness shall go before thee: and the glory of God shall surround thee. Then thou shalt cry out, and God shall hear thee; while thou art yet speaking, He shall say, Here I am." Concerning this same thing in Job: "I have preserved the needy from the hand of the mighty; and I have helped the orphan, to whom there was no helper. The mouth of the widow blessed me, since I was the eye of the blind; I was also the foot of the lame, and the father of the weak." Of this same matter in Tobit: "And I said to Tobias, My son, go and bring whatever poor man thou shalt find out of our brethren, who still has God in mind with his whole heart. Bring him hither, and he shall eat my dinner together with me. Behold, I attend thee, my son, until thou come." Also in the same place: "All the days of thy life, my son, keep God in mind, and transgress not His precepts. Do justice all the days of thy life, and do not walk in the way of unrighteousness; because if thou act truly, there will be respect of thy works. Give alms of thy substance, and turn not thy face from any poor man. So shall it come to pass that the face of God shall not be turned away from thee. Even as thou hast, my son, so do: if thou hast abundant substance, give the more alms therefrom; if thou hast little, communicate even of that little. And do not fear when thou givest alms: thou layest up for thyself a good reward against the day of need; because alms delivereth from death, and does not suffer to go into darkness. Alms is a good office for all who do it in the sight of the most high God." On this same subject in Solomon in Proverbs: "He that hath pity on the poor lendeth unto the Lord.... - Cyprian, Treatise 12, Three Books of Testimonies Against the Jews, 3

Tobit 2:4-7
Tobit also clearly portrayed in his life true virtue, when he left the feast and buried the dead, and invited the needy to the meals at his own poor table. And Raguel is a still brighter example. For he, in his regard for virtue, when asked to give his daughter in marriage, was not silent regarding his daughter's faults, for fear of seeming to get the better of the suitor by silence. So when Tobit the son of Tobias asked that his daughter might be given him, he answered that, according to the law, she ought to be given him as near of kin, but that he had already given her to six men, and all of them were dead. This just man, then, feared more for others than for himself, and wished rather that his daughter should remain unmarried than that others should run risks in consequence of their union with her. How simply he settled all the questions of the philosophers! They talk about the defects of a house, whether they ought to be concealed or made known by the vendor. Raguel was quite certain that his daughter's faults ought not to be kept secret. And, indeed, he had not been eager to give her up-he was asked for her. We can have no doubt how much more nobly he acted than those philosophers, when we consider how much more important a daughter's future is than some mere money affair. - Ambrose, On the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 16

Tobit 2:7
"Let it follows not that the bodies of the departed are to be despised and flung aside, and above all of just and faithful men, which bodies as organs and vessels to all good works their spirit hath holily used. For if a father's garment and ring, and whatever such like, is the more dear to those whom they leave behind, the greater their affection is towards their parents, in no wise are the bodies themselves to be spurned, which truly we wear in more familiar and close conjunction than any of our putting on. For these pertain not to ornament or aid which is applied from without, but to the very nature of man. Whence also the funerals of the just men of old were with dutiful piety cared for, and their obsequies celebrated, and sepulture provided: and themselves while living did touching burial or even translation of their bodies give charge to their sons. Tobias also, to have by burying of the dead obtained favor with God, is by witness of an Angel commended." - Bl. Augustine, On the Care To Be Had For the Dead, 5

Tobit 2:11
"Therefore, as these which we have in our face, and call lights, when they are both healthy and open, need the help of light from without,--which being removed or not brought in, though they are sound and are open, yet they do not see,--so our mind, which is the eye of the soul, unless it be irradiated by the light of truth, and wondrously shone upon by Him who enlightens and is not enlightened, will not be able to come to wisdom nor to righteousness. For to live righteously is for us the way itself. But how can he on whom the light does not shine but stumble in the way? And hence, in such a way, we have need of seeing, in such a way it is a great thing to see. Now Tobias had the eyes in his face closed, and the son gave his hand to the father; and yet the father, by his instruction, pointed out the way to the son. - Bl. Augustine, Tractates on John, 35

Tobit 2:14
But in the world ye shall have affliction; but have confidence, for I have overcome the world." Concerning this same thing in the second Epistle to the Corinthians: "There was given to me a thorn in the flesh, a messenger of Satan to buffet me, that I should not be exalted. For which thing I thrice besought the Lord, that it should depart from me. And He said unto me, My grace is sufficient for thee; for strength is perfected in weakness." Concerning this same thing to the Romans: "We glory in hope of the glory of God. And not only so, but we also glory in afflictions: knowing that affliction worketh patience; and patience, experience; and experience, hope: and hope does not confound; because the love of God is infused in our hearts by the Holy Spirit, which is given unto us." On this same subject, according to Matthew: "How broad and spacious is the way which leadeth unto death, and many there are who go in thereby: how straight and narrow is the way that leadeth to life, and few there are that find it!"Of this same thing in Tobias: "Where are thy righteousnesses? behold what thou sufferest."Also in the Wisdom of Solomon: "In the places of the wicked the righteous groan; but at their ruin the righteous will abound." - Cyprian, Treatise 12, Three Books of Testimonies Against the Jews, 3

Tobit 2:14
If we have received good from the hand of the Lord, why shall we not suffer evil? In all these things which befell him, Job sinned not with his lips in the sight of the Lord." Therefore the Lord God gives him a testimony, saying, "Hast thou considered my servant Job? for there is none like him in all the earth, a man without complaint, a true worshipper of God." And Tobias, after his excellent works, after the many and glorious illustrations of his merciful spirit, having suffered the loss of his sight, fearing and blessing God in his adversity, by his very bodily affliction increased in praise; and even him also his wife tried to pervert, saying, "Where are thy righteousnesses? Behold what thou sufferest!" But he, stedfast and firm in respect of the fear of God, and armed by the faith of his religion to all endurance of suffering, yielded not to the temptation of his weak wife in his trouble, but rather deserved better from God by his greater patience; and afterwards Raphael the angel praises him, saying, "It is honourable to show forth and to confess the works of God. For when thou didst pray, and Sara thy daughter-in-law, I did offer the remembrance of your prayer in the presence of the glory of God. And when thou didst bury the dead in singleness of heart, and because thou didst not delay to rise up and leave thy dinner, and wentest and didst bury the dead, I was sent to make proof of thee. And God again hath sent me to heal thee and Sara thy daughter-in-law. For I am Raphael, one of the seven holy angels, who are present, and go in and out before the glory of God." - Cyprian, Treatise 7, On the Mortality, 10

Tobit 2:14
"Now what thing more precious can we have than the eye made whole? They rejoice who see this created light which shines from heaven, or even that which is given out from a lamp. And how wretched do they seem, who cannot see this light? But wherefore do I speak, and talk of all these things, but to exhort you all to "cry out," when Jesus 'passeth by.' I hold up this light which perhaps ye do not see as an object of love to you, Holy Brethren. Believe, whilst as yet ye see not; and "cry out" that ye may see. How great is thought to be the unhappiness of men, who do not see this bodily light? Does any one become blind; immediately it is said; 'God is angry with him, he has committed some wicked deed.' So said Tobias' wife to her husband. He cried out because of the kid, lest it had come of theft; he did not like to hear the sound of any stolen thing in his house; and she, maintaining what she had done, reproached her husband; and when he said, 'Restore it if it be stolen;' she answered insultingly, "Where are thy righteous deeds?" How great was her blindness who maintained the theft; and how clear a light he saw, who commanded the stolen thing to be restored! She rejoiced outwardly in the light of the sun; he inwardly in the light of Righteousness. Which of them was in the better light?"- Bl. Augustine, Sermon 38 on the Harmony of the Gospels, 15

Tobit 3:17
"He shows also, that when Susannah prayed to God, and was heard, the angel was sent then to help her, just as was the case in the instance of Tobias and Sara. For when they prayed, the supplication of both of them was heard in the same day and the same hour, and the angel Raphael was sent to heal them both." - Hippolytus, Exegetical Fragments, 6

Tobit 4
"And how is He King of all the earth, who appeared in one part of the earth, in Jerusalem, in Judea,walking among men, born, sucking the breast, growing, eating, drinking, waking, sleeping, sitting at a well, wearied; laid hold of, scourged, spat upon ,crowned with thorns, hanged on a tree, wounded with a spear, dead, buried? How then King of all the earth? What was seen locally was flesh, to carnal eyes only flesh was visible; the immortal majesty was concealed in mortal flesh. And with what eyes shall we be able to behold the immortal majesty, after penetrating through the structure of the flesh? There is another eye, there is an inner eye. Tobias, for example, was not without eyes, when, blind in his bodily eyes, he was giving precepts of life to his son." - Bl. Augustine, Tractate 13 on John

Tobit 4:3-19
"As yet the punishments of the lower places have not come, as yet fire everlasting hath not come: let him that is growing in God compare himself now with an ungodly man, a blind heart with an enlightened heart: compare ye two men, one seeing and one not seeing in the flesh. And what so great thing is vision of the flesh? Did Tobias by any means have fleshly eyes? His own son had, and he had not; and the way of life a blind man to one seeing did show. Therefore when ye see that punishment, rejoice, because in it ye are not. Therefore saith the Scripture, 'The just man shall rejoice when he shall have seen vengeance'. Not that future punishment; for see what followeth: 'his hands he shall wash in the blood of the sinner.'" - Bl. Augustine, Commentary on Psalm 58

Tobit 4:5-11
"'Even as thou hast, my son, so do: if thou hast abundant substance, give the more alms therefrom; if thou hast little, communicate even of that little. And do not fear when thou givest alms: thou layest up for thyself a good reward against the day of need; because alms delivereth from death, and does not suffer to go into darkness. Alms is a good office for all who do it in the sight of the most high God.' On this same subject in Solomon in Proverbs: 'He that hath pity on the poor lendeth unto the Lord.' Also in the same place: 'He that giveth to the poor shall never want; but he who turns away his eye shall be in much penury.' Also in the same place: 'Sins are purged away by alms-giving and faith.'" - Cyprian, Treatise 12, Three Books of Testimonies Against the Jews, 3

Tobit 4:5-11
"Be rather such a father to your children as was Tobias. Give useful and saving precepts to your pledges, such as he gave to his son; command your children what he also commanded his son, saying: 'And now, my son, I command thee, serve God in truth, and do before Him that which pleaseth Him; and command thy sons, that they exercise righteousness and alms, and be mindful of God, and bless His name always.' And again: 'All the days of thy life, most dear son, have God in your mind, and be not willing to transgress His commandments. Do righteousness all the days of thy life, and be not willing to walk in the way of iniquity; because if thou deal truly, there will be respect of thy works. Give alms of thy substance, and turn not away thy face from any poor man. So shall it be, that neither shall the face of God be turned away from thee. As thou hast, my son, so do. If thy substance is abundant, give alms of it the more. If thou hast little, communicate of that little. And fear not when thou doest alms; for thou layest up a good reward for thyself against the day of necessity, because that alms do deliver from death, and suffereth not to come into Gehenna. Alms is a good gift to all that give it, in the sight of the most high God.'" - Cyprian, Treatise 8, On Works and Alms, 20

Tobit 4:7
"For 'almsgiving wipes out sin' kills death, and extinguishes the punishment of perpetual fire.  But he who has not been fruitful therein, shall have no indulgence from the great Recompenser, as Solomon says, 'He that closeth his ears lest he should hear the weak, shall himself call upon the Lord, and there shall be none to hear him'  And hence Tobias also, while instructing his son in the precepts of godliness, says, 'Give alms of
thy substance, and turn not thy face from any poor man:  so shall it come to pass that the face of God shall not be turned from thee.' This virtue makes all virtues profitable; for by its presence it gives life to that very faith, by which 'the just lives,' and which is said to be 'dead without works': because as the reason for works consists in faith, so the strength of faith consists in works. 'While we have time therefore,' as the Apostle says, 'let us do that which is good to all men, and especially to them that are of the household of faith'." - St. Leo the Great, Sermon 10

Tobit 4:9
"And yet I rejoice with your benignity that you carefully attend to and observe what the Truth says; Give alms, and behold, all things are clean unto you; and this which is written, Even as water quencheth fire, so alms quench sin. Paul the apostle also says, Let your abundance supply their want, that their abundance also may be a supply to your want. Tobias admonishes his son, saying, If thou hast much, give abundantly; but if thou hast little, of that little impart willingly. You therefore observe all these precepts: but we beg you to pray for us, lest we should dispense the fruits of your labours indiscreetly, and not as need requires; lest from that whereby you diminish sins we should heap up sins." - Gregory the Great, Epistles, 7, 28

Tobit 4:9
"Give alms, and behold, all things are clean unto you; and this which is written, Even as water quencheth fire, so alms quench sin. Paul the apostle also says, Let your abundance supply their want, that their abundance also may be a supply to your want.  Tobias admonishes his son, saying, If thou hast much, give abundantly; but if thou hast little, of that little impart willingly.  You therefore observe all these precepts:  but we beg you to pray for us, lest we should dispense the fruits of your labours indiscreetly, and not as need requires; lest from that whereby you diminish sins we should heap up sins." - Gregory the Great, Epistle 28

Tobit 4:10
"But I wonder that some are so obstinate as to think that repentance is not to be granted to the lapsed, or to suppose that pardon is to be denied to the penitent, when it is written, 'Remember whence thou art fallen, and repent, and do the first works,' which certainly is said to him who evidently has fallen, and whom the Lord exhorts to rise up again by his works, because it is written, 'Alms do deliver from death,' and not, assuredly, from that death which once the blood of Christ extinguished, and from which the saving grace of baptism and of our Redeemer has delivered us, but from that which subsequently creeps in through sins." - Cyprian, Epistle 51, 22

Tobit 4:10
"Stand fast, therefore, in these things, and follow the example of the Lord, being firm and unchangeable in the faith, loving the brotherhood, and being attached to one another, joined together in the truth, exhibiting the meekness of the Lord in your intercourse with one another, and despising no one. When you can do good, defer it not, because 'alms delivers from death.' Be all of you subject one to another having your conduct blameless among the Gentiles, that ye may both receive praise for your good works, and the Lord may not be blasphemed through you. But woe to him by whom the name of the Lord is blasphemed! Teach, therefore, sobriety to all, and manifest it also in your own conduct." - Polycarp, Epistle to the Philippians, 10

Tobit 4:10
"It is to the love of this light that I would exhort you, Beloved; that ye would cry out by your works, when the Lord "passeth by;" let the voice of faith sound out, that "Jesus standing still," that is, the Unchangeable, Abiding Wisdom of God, and the Majesty of the Word of God, "by which all things were made," may open your eyes. The same Tobias in giving advice to his son, instructed him to this, to cry out; that is, he instructed him to good works. He told him to give to the poor, charged him to give alms to the needy, and taught him, saying, "My son, alms suffereth not to come into darkness." The blind gave counsel for receiving and gaining light. "Alms," saith he, "suffereth not to come into darkness." Had his son in astonishment answered him, "What then, father, hast thou not given alms, that thou now speakest to me in blindness; art not thou in darkness, and yet thou dost say to me, "Alms suffereth not to come into darkness." But no, he knew well what the light was, concerning which he gave his son instruction, he knew well what he saw in the inner man. The son held out his hand to his father, to enable him to walk on earth; and the father to the son, to enable him to dwell in heaven." - Bl. Augustine, Sermon 38 on the Harmony of the Gospels, 16

Tobit 4:12
"In Tobias: 'Take a wife from the seed of thy parents, and take not a strange woman who is not of the tribe of thy parents.' Also in Genesis, Abraham sends his servant to take from his seed Rebecca, for his son Isaac. Also in Esdras, it was not sufficient for God when the Jews were laid waste, unless they forsook their foreign wives, with the children also whom they had begotten of them. Also in the first Epistle of Paul to the Corinthians: 'The woman is bound so long as her husband liveth; but if he die, she is freed to marry whom she will, only in the Lord. But she will be happier if she abide thus.' And again: 'Know ye not that your bodies are the members of Christ? Shall I take the members of Christ, and make them the members of an harlot? Far be it from me. Or know ye not that he who is joined together with an harlot is one body? for two shall be in one flesh. But he who is joined to the Lord is one spirit.' Also in the second to the Corinthians: 'Be not joined together with unbelievers. For what participation is there between righteousness and unrighteousness? or what communication hath light with darkness?' Also concerning Solomon in the third book of Kings: 'And foreign wives turned away his heart after their gods.'" - Cyprian, Treatise 12, Three Books of Testimonies Against the Jews, 3

Tobit 4:15
"Plato ranks marriage among outward good things, providing for the perpetuity of our race, and handing down as a torch a certain perpetuity to children's children. Democritus repudiates marriage and the procreation of children, on account of the many annoyances thence arising, and abstractions from more necessary things. Epicurus agrees, and those who place good in pleasure, and in the absence of trouble and pain. According to the opinion of the Stoics, marriage and the rearing of children are a thing indifferent; and according to the Peripatetics, a good. In a word, these, following out their dogmas in words, became enslaved to pleasures; some using concubines, some mistresses, and the most youths. And that wise quaternion in the garden with a mistress, honoured pleasure by their acts. Those, then, will not escape the curse of yoking an ass with an ox, who, judging certain things not to suit them, command others to do them, or the reverse. This Scripture has briefly showed, when it says, 'What thou hatest, thou shalt not do to another.'" - Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 2, 23

Tobit 4:15
"The words which we have sung must be rather hearkened to by us, than proclaimed. For to all men as it were in an assemblage of mankind, the Truth crieth, "If truly indeed justice ye speak, judge right things, ye sons of men" (ver. 1). For to what unjust man is it not an easy thing to speak justice? or what man if questioned about justice, when he hath not a cause, would not easily answer what is just? Inasmuch as the hand of our Maker in our very hearts hath written this truth, "That which to thyself thou wouldest not have done, do not thou to another." [2163] Of this truth, even before that the Law was given, no one was suffered to be ignorant, in order that there might be some rule whereby might be judged even those to whom Law had not been given. [2164] But lest men should complain that something had been wanting for them, there hath been written also in tables that which in their hearts they read not. For it was not that they had it not written, but read it they would not. - Bl. Augustine, Commentary on Psalm 58

Tobit 4:15
"The innocent man, while he believes easily, falls readily; but though he falls, he rises; and the shuffler, with all his arts, goes headlong to ruin, whence he can never rise or escape. Therefore let every one weigh well his words, and let him not say to another what he would not say to himself. Whence the sacred Scripture says well: 'Do not that to another which thou wouldest not have done to thyself.' For we need time to do anything perfectly (maturius); and let us not be precipitate in our counsels or our works, neither let us violate order. But if any one has fallen in anything, let us not consign him to ruin; but let us reprove him with brotherly affection, as the blessed apostle says: 'If a man be overtaken in any fault, ye which are spiritual restore such an one in the spirit of meekness; considering thyself, test thou also be tempted.'" - Epistles of Pope Callistus, 2, 5

Tobit 4:17
"For the mind should first be prepared for patience, and then either much or all be bestowed in bounty, lest, the inroad of want being borne with but little equanimity, both the reward of previous bounty be lost, and subsequent murmuring bring worse ruin on the soul. Lest they should give nothing at all to those on whom they ought to bestow something, let them hear what is written, Give to every man that asketh of thee. Lest they should give something, however little to those on whom they ought to bestow nothing at all, let them hear what is written. Give to the good man, and receive not a sinner: do well to him that is lowly, and give not to the ungodly. And again, Set out thy bread and wine on the burial of the just, but eat and drink not thereof with sinners." - Gregory the Great, The Book of Pastoral Rule, 20

Tobit 4:18
"Now then, I would also meet the other and only remaining objection of my accuser. He says, the building was not completed, and prayer ought not to have been made there. But the Lord said, `But thou, when thou prayest, enter into thy closet, and shut the .' What then will the accuser answer? or rather what will all prudent and true Christians say? Let your Majesty ask the opinion of such: for it is written of the other, `The foolish person will speak foolishness;' but of these, `Ask counsel of all that are wise.'" - Athanasius, Defense Before Constantius, 17
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2009, 06:51:27 PM »

Tobit 7-14
Tobit 7:11
"Tobit also clearly portrayed in his life true virtue, when he left the feast and buried the dead, and invited the needy to the meals at his own poor table. And Raguel is a still brighter example. For he, in his regard for virtue, when asked to give his daughter in marriage, was not silent regarding his daughter's faults, for fear of seeming to get the better of the suitor by silence. So when Tobit the son of Tobias asked that his daughter might be given him, he answered that, according to the law, she ought to be given him as near of kin, but that he had already given her to six men, and all of them were dead. This just man, then, feared more for others than for himself, and wished rather that his daughter should remain unmarried than that others should run risks in consequence of their union with her." - Ambrose, On the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 16

Tobit 8:7-8
"Then appeared to Jacob an angel of the Lord, saying, Two children shall Rachel bear; for she hath refused company with her husband, and hath chosen continency. And had not Leah my mother given up the two apples for the sake of his company, she would have borne eight sons; and for this thing she bare six, and Rachel two: because on account of the mandrakes the Lord visited her. For He knew that for the sake of children she wished to company with Jacob, and not for lust of pleasure. For she went further, and on the morrow too gave up Jacob that she might receive also the other mandrake. Therefore the Lord hearkened to Rachel because of the mandrakes: for though she desired them, she ate them not, but brought them to the priest of the Most High who was at that time, and offered them up in the house of the Lord." - Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs, 5, The Testament of Issachar Concerning Simplicity, 2

Tobit 9:3
"But if thou dost not accept the truth of His mission according to the flesh, as the Apostle spoke of it, and dost raise out of a mere word a decision against it, to enable thee to say that inferiors are wont to be sent by superiors; what answer wilt thou give to the fact that the Son was sent to men? For if thou dost think that he who is sent is inferior to him by whom he is sent, thou must learn also that an inferior has sent a superior, and that superiors have been sent to inferiors. For Tobias sent Raphael the archangel, and an angel was sent to Balsam, and the Son of God to the Jews." - Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 5, 7

Tobit 12:7
"And they are not ashamed to parade the sacred mysteries before Catechumens, and worse than that, even before heathens: whereas, they ought to attend to what is written, `It is good to keep close the secret of a king;' and as the Lord has charged us, `Give not that which is holy unto the dogs, neither cast ye your pearls before swine.'" - Athanasius, Defense Against the Arians, 1, 11

Tobit 12:7
"Then, knowing that there was a secret and mystical meaning in the passage, as was becoming in one who was leaving, in his Epistles, to those who were to come after him words full of significance, he subjoins the following, 'Behold, I show you a mystery;' which is his usual style in introducing matters of a profounder and more mystical nature, and such as are fittingly concealed from the multitude, as is written in the book of Tobit: 'It is good to keep close the secret of a king, but honourable to reveal the works of God,' in a way consistent with truth and God's glory, and so as to be to the advantage of the multitude." - Origen, Against Celcus, 5, 19

Tobit 12:7
"But on these subjects much, and that of a mystical kind, might be said; in keeping with which is the following: 'It is good to keep close the secret of a king,' in order that the doctrine of the entrance of souls into bodies (not, however, that of the transmigration from one body into another) may not be thrown before the common understanding, nor what is holy given to the dogs, nor pearls be cast before swine. For such a procedure would be impious, being equivalent to a betrayal of the mysterious declarations of God's wisdom. of which it has been well said: 'Into a malicious soul wisdom shall not enter, nor dwell in a body subject to sin.' It is sufficient, however, to represent in the style of a historic narrative what is intended to convey a secret meaning in the garb of history, that those who have the capacity may work out for themselves all that relates to the subject. (The narrative, then, may be understood as follows.)" - Origen, Against Celcus, 5, 29

Tobit 12:8
"And first he will ask forgiveness of sins; and after, that he may sin no more; and further, the power of well-doing and of comprehending the whole creation and administration by the Lord, that, becoming pure in heart through the knowledge, which is by the Son of God, he may be initiated into the beatific vision face to face, having heard the Scripture which says, 'Fasting with prayer is a good thing.'" - Clement of Alexandria, The Stromata, 6, 12

Tobit 12:8-9
"And what is the intention of the Scripture which teaches us that Peter fasted, and that the revelation concerning the baptism of Gentiles was made to him when fasting and praying, except to show that the Saints themselves advance when they fast. Finally, Moses received the Law when he was fasting; and so Peter when fasting was taught the grace of the New Testament. Daniel too by virtue of his fast stopped the mouths of the lions and saw the events of future times. And what safety can there be for us unless we wash away our sins by fasting, since ScriptUre says that fasting and alms do away sin?" - Ambrose, Epistle 63, 16

Tobit 12:8-9
"Remembering which precepts, Daniel, when king Nebuchodonosor was in anxiety, being frightened by an adverse dream, gave him, for the turning away of evils, a remedy to obtain the divine help, saying, 'Wherefore, O king, let my counsel be acceptable to thee; and redeem thy sins by almsgivings, and thine unrighteousness by mercies to the poor, and God will be patient to thy sins.' And as the king did not obey him, he underwent the misfortunes and mischiefs which he had seen, and which he might have escaped and avoided had he redeemed his sins by almsgiving. Raphael the angel also witnesses the like, and exhorts that alms should be freely and liberally bestowed, saying, 'Prayer is good, with fasting and alms; because alms doth deliver from death, and it purgeth away sins.' He shows that our prayers and fastings are of less avail, unless they are aided by almsgiving; that entreaties alone are of little force to obtain what they seek, unless they be made sufficient by the addition of deeds and good works. The angel reveals, and manifests, and certifies that our petitions become efficacious by almsgiving, that life is redeemed from dangers by almsgiving, that souls are delivered from death by almsgiving. Neither, beloved brethren, are we so bringing forward these things, as that we should not prove what Raphael the angel said, by the testimony of the truth. In the Acts of the Apostles the faith of the fact is established; and that souls are delivered by almsgiving not only from the second, but from the first death, is discovered by the evidence of a matter accomplished and completed." - Cyprian, Treatise 8, On Works and Alms, 5-6

Tobit 12:8-9
"Wherefore, brethren, having received no small occasion for repentance, while we have the opportunity, let us turn unto God that called us, while we still have Him as One that receiveth us. For if we renounce these enjoyments and conquer our soul in not doing these its evil desires, we shall partake of the mercy of Jesus. But ye know that the day of judgment even now 'cometh as a burning oven,' and some 'of the heavens shall melt,' and all the earth shall be as lead melting on the fire, and then the hidden and open works of men shall appear. Almsgiving therefore is a good thing, as repentance from sin; fasting is better than prayer, but almsgiving than both; 'but love covereth a multitude of sins.' But prayer out of a good conscience delivereth from death. Blessed is every one that is found full of these; for alms-giving lighteneth the burden of sin." - Pseudo-Clement, 2 Corinthians, 16

Tobit 12:9
"Stand fast, therefore, in these things, and follow the example of the Lord, being firm and unchangeable in the faith, loving the brotherhood, and being attached to one another, joined together in the truth, exhibiting the meekness of the Lord in your intercourse with one another, and despising no one. When you can do good, defer it not, because 'alms delivers from death.' Be all of you subject one to another having your conduct blameless among the Gentiles, that ye may both receive praise for your good works, and the Lord may not be blasphemed through you. But woe to him by whom the name of the Lord is blasphemed! Teach, therefore, sobriety to all, and manifest it also in your own conduct." - Polycarp, Epistle to the Philippians, 10

Tobit 12:11-15
"And Tobias, after his excellent works, after the many and glorious illustrations of his merciful spirit, having suffered the loss of his sight, fearing and blessing God in his adversity, by his very bodily affliction increased in praise; and even him also his wife tried to pervert, saying, 'Where are thy righteousnesses? Behold what thou sufferest!' But he, stedfast and firm in respect of the fear of God, and armed by the faith of his religion to all endurance of suffering, yielded not to the temptation of his weak wife in his trouble, but rather deserved better from God by his greater patience; and afterwards Raphael the angel praises him, saying, 'It is honourable to show forth and to confess the works of God. For when thou didst pray, and Sara thy daughter-in-law, I did offer the remembrance of your prayer in the presence of the glory of God. And when thou didst bury the dead in singleness of heart, and because thou didst not delay to rise up and leave thy dinner, and wentest and didst bury the dead, I was sent to make proof of thee. And God again hath sent me to heal thee and Sara thy daughter-in-law. For I am Raphael, one of the seven holy angels, who are present, and go in and out before the glory of God.'" - Cyprian, Treatise 7, On The Mortality, 10

Tobit 12:12
"If, on the one hand, it is irreverent to sit under the eye, and over against the eye, of him whom you most of all revere and venerate; how much more, on the other hand, is that deed most irreligious under the eye of the living God, while the angel Of prayer is still standing by unless we are upbraiding God that prayer has wearied us!" - Tertullian, On prayer, 16

Tobit 12:12
"Let it follows not that the bodies of the departed are to be despised and flung aside, and above all of just and faithful men, which bodies as organs and vessels to all good works their spirit hath holily used. For if a father's garment and ring, and whatever such like, is the more dear to those whom they leave behind, the greater their affection is towards their parents, in no wise are the bodies themselves to be spurned, which truly we wear in more familiar and close conjunction than any of our putting on. For these pertain not to ornament or aid which is applied from without, but to the very nature of man. Whence also the funerals of the just men of old were with dutiful piety cared for, and their obsequies celebrated, and sepulture provided: and themselves while living did touching burial or even translation of their bodies give charge to their sons. Tobias also, to have by burying of the dead obtained favor with God, is by witness of an Angel commended." - Bl. Augustine, On the Care To Be Had For the Dead, 5

Tobit 12:12
Nevertheless the bodies of the dead are not on this account to be despised and left unburied; least of all the bodies of the righteous and faithful, which have been used by the Holy Spirit as His organs and instruments for all good works.  For if the dress of a father, or his ring, or anything he wore, be precious to his children, in proportion to the love they bore him, with how much more reason ought we to care for the bodies of those we love, which they wore far more closely and intimately than any clothing!  For the body is not an extraneous ornament or aid, but a part of man's very nature.  And therefore to the righteous of ancient times the last offices were piously rendered, and sepulchres provided for them, and obsequies celebrated; and they themselves, while yet alive, gave commandment to their sons about the burial, and, on occasion, even about the removal of their bodies to some favorite place. And Tobit, according to the angel's testimony, is commended, and is said to have pleased God by burying the dead." - Bl. Augustine, City of God, 1, 13

Tobit 12:12-15
"Moreover, those who pray should not come to God with fruitless or naked prayers. Petition is ineffectual when it is a barren entreaty that beseeches God. For as every tree that bringeth not forth fruit is cut down and cast into the fire; assuredly also, words that do not bear fruit cannot deserve anything of God, because they are fruitful in no result. And thus Holy Scripture instructs us, saying, 'Prayer. is good with fasting and almsgiving.' For He who will give us in the day of judgment a reward for our labours and alms, is even in this life a merciful hearer of one who comes to Him in prayer associated with good works." - Cyprian, Treatise 4, On the Lord's Prayer, 32

Tobit 12:12-15
"Those prayers quickly ascend to God which the merits of our labours urge upon God. Thus also Raphael the angel was a witness to the constant prayer and the constant good works of Tobias, saying, 'It is honourable to reveal and confess the works of God. For when thou didst pray, and Sarah, I did bring the remembrance of your prayers before the holiness of God. And when thou didst bury the dead in simplicity, and because thou didst not delay to rise up and to leave thy dinner, but didst go out and cover the dead, I was sent to prove thee; and again God has sent me to heal thee, and Sarah thy daughter-in-law. For I am Raphael, one of the seven holy angels which stand and go in and out before the glory of God.'" - Cyprian, Treatise 4, On the Lord's Prayer, 33

Tobit 12:16
"But it is alleged that the future resurrection of the body is a proof that the soul was after death absolutely without a body. This is not, however, an unanswerable objection, for the angels, who are like our souls invisible, have at times desired to appear in bodily forms and be seen, and (whatever might be the form of body worthy to be assumed by these spirits) they have appeared, for example, to Abraham and to Tobias. Therefore it is quite possible that the resurrection of the body may, as we assuredly believe, take place, and yet that the soul may be reunited to it without its being found to have been at any moment wholly devoid of some kind of body." - Bl. Augustine, Letter 158

Tobit 13:2
"He who is compelled to climb the rock of fasting against his will cannot fail to be dragged down by his desire and thrown headlong into eating in secret. And so, as he nibbles, he becomes, I think, food for the evil one, for fasting is a divien law and those who presume to transgress  it are seized by the devil, who flogs them like an executioner. If this does not happen immediately or quickly it is because God is patient with us and accepts our penitence. Yet we shall not altogether 'escape his hand' (Tob. 13:2) either in this life or in the world to come, if we persist in sin without repenting thereof." - St. Symeon the New Theologian, The Discourses, 11 (On Fasting), §3

Tobit 13:6
"And Daniel, devoted to God, and filled with the Holy Spirit, exclaims and says: 'I worship nothing but the Lord my God, who founded the heaven and the earth.' Tobias also, although under a royal and tyrannical slavery, yet in feeling and spirit free, maintains his confession to God, and sublimely announces both the divine power and majesty, saying: 'In the land of my captivity I confess to Him, and I show forth His power in a sinful nation.' What, indeed, do we find in the Maccabees of seven brethren, equals alike in their lot of birth and virtues, filling up the number seven in the sacrament of a perfected completion? Seven brethren were thus associating in martyrdom." - Cyprian, Treatise 11, Exhortation to Martyrdom, 11

Tobit 14:10-11
"Be rather such a father to your children as was Tobias. Give useful and saving precepts to your pledges, such as he gave to his son; command your children what he also commanded his son, saying: 'And now, my son, I command thee, serve God in truth, and do before Him that which pleaseth Him; and command thy sons, that they exercise righteousness and alms, and be mindful of God, and bless His name always.' And again: 'All the days of thy life, most dear son, have God in your mind, and be not willing to transgress His commandments. Do righteousness all the days of thy life, and be not willing to walk in the way of iniquity; because if thou deal truly, there will be respect of thy works. Give alms of thy substance, and turn not away thy face from any poor man. So shall it be, that neither shall the face of God be turned away from thee. As thou hast, my son, so do. If thy substance is abundant, give alms of it the more. If thou hast little, communicate of that little. And fear not when thou doest alms; for thou layest up a good reward for thyself against the day of necessity, because that alms do deliver from death, and suffereth not to come into Gehenna. Alms is a good gift to all that give it, in the sight of the most high God.'" - Cyprian, Treatise 8, On Works and Alms, 20
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Justin Kissel
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« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2009, 06:52:12 PM »

Wisdom of Solomon

Wis. 1:4
So the  soul whose life is in God will find her pleasure in no single one of those things which make a beauteous show to  deceive her. If she were, in some fit of weakness, to admit the defilement to her heart, she would herself have  broken the covenant of her spiritual marriage; and, as the Scripture tells us, "into the malicious soul Wisdom cannot  come." (Wis. 1:4) - St. Gregory of Nyssa, On Virginity, 15

No one envies such an one when he is in prosperity, no one tramples upon him when he is in adversity, but all rejoice with him when he does well, and grieve with him in misfortune. Whereas whenever a bitter man fares prosperously, one and all lament it, as though some evil thing happened; but if he is unfortunate, one and all rejoice. Let us then pity them, for they have common enemies all over the world. Jacob was a guileless man, yet he overcame the treacherous Esau. "For into a malicious soul wisdom shall not enter." (Wis. 1:4) "Let all bitterness be put away from you." Let not even a remnant remain, for it will be sure, if stirred, as if from a smouldering brand, to turn all within to an entire blaze.  - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 15 on Ephesians

Wis. 1:4-5
Whoever then would arrive at this theoretical knowledge must first pursue practical knowledge with all his might and main. For this practical knowledge can be acquired without theoretical, but theoretical cannot possibly be gained without practical. For there are certain stages, so distinct, and arranged in such a way that man's humility may be able to mount on high; and if these follow each other in turn in the order of which we have spoken, man can attain to a height to which he could not fly, if the first step were wanting. In vain then does one strive for the vision of God, who does not shun the stains of sins: "For the spirit of God hates deception, and dwells not in a body subject to sins." - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 14:The First Conference of Abbot Nesteros, 2

Wis. 1:5
Wherefore we must cast out all wickedness from our souls, and never more contrive any deceit; for, saith one, "To the perverse God sendeth crooked paths" (Prov. 21:8); and, "The holy spirit of discipline will flee deceit, and remove from thoughts that are without understanding." (Wis. 1:5) For nothing maketh men so foolish as wickedness; since when a man is treacherous, unfair, ungrateful, (these are different forms of wickedness,) when without having been wronged he grieves another, when he weaves deceits, how shall he not exhibit an example of excessive folly? Again, nothing maketh men so wise as virtue; it rendereth them thankful and fair-minded, merciful, mild, gentle, and candid; it is wont to be the mother of all other blessings. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 41 on John

Let the insincere hear what is written, He that walketh in simplicity walketh surely (Prov. 10:9).  For indeed simplicity of conduct is an assurance of great security.  Let them hear what is said by the mouth of the wise man, The holy spirit of discipline will flee deceit (Wis. 1:5).  Let them hear what is again affirmed by the witness of Scripture, His communing is with the simple (Prov. 3:32).  For God's communing is His revealing of secrets to human minds by the illumination of His presence.  He is therefore said to commune with the simple, because He illuminates with the ray of His visitation concerning supernal mysteries the minds of those whom no shade of duplicity obscures.  But it is a special evil of the double-minded, that, while they deceive others by their crooked and double conduct, they glory as though they were surpassingly prudent beyond others; and, since they consider not the strictness of retribution, they exult, miserable men that they are, in their own losses. - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 11

Wis. 1:7
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 23

Wis. 1:11
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 53: To John

Wis. 1:13
And so far do all who perish, perish against the will of God, that God cannot be said to have made death, as Scripture itself testifies: "For God made not death, neither rejoiceth in the destruction of the living." (Wis. 1:13)  And hence it comes that for the most part when instead of good things we ask for the opposite, our prayer is either heard but tardily or not at all; and again the Lord vouchsafes to bring upon us even against our will, like some most beneficent physician, for our good what we think is opposed to it, and sometimes He delays and hinders our injurious purposes and deadly attempts from having their horrible effects, and, while we are rushing headlong towards death, draws us back to salvation, and rescues us without our knowing it from the jaws of hell. - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 13:The Third Conference of Abbot Chæremon, 7

Of things that are not in our hands some have their beginning or cause in those that are in our power, that is to say, the recompenses of our actions both in the present and in the age to come, but all the rest are dependent on the divine will. For the origin of all things is from God, but their destruction has been introduced by our wickedness for our punishment or benefit. For God did not create death, neither does He take delight in the destruction of living things (Wis. 1:13). But death is the work rather of man, that is, its origin is in Adam's transgression, in like manner as all other punishments. But all other things must be referred to God. - St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 2, 28

Wis. 1:14
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on Philippians

Wis. 2:12
Epistle of Barnabas, 6
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 5, 14

Wis. 2:15
But, as I said, the light is hateful to the thief, and the mere sight of the just man is odious to sinners; "for he is grievous unto us even to behold." (Wisdom of Solomon ii. 15.) For they cannot bear his radiance, even as diseased eyes cannot bear the sun's. But to many of the wicked he is grievous not to behold only, but even to hear of. And therefore that polluted and all-polluted woman, the procuress of her girl, yea rather her murderess, although she had never seen him nor heard his voice, rushed on to his slaughter; and prepareth her whom she brought up in lasciviousnss to proceed also to murder, so extravagantly did she fear him. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 28 on Second Corinthians

And there is a gain to the wicked from their mixing with the good. They feel confusion, they are ashamed, they blush in their presence; and even if they do not abstain from evil, yet nevertheless they dare what they dare with secrecy. And this is no small thing not to have transgression publicly committed. For the life of the others becomes the accuser of the wickedness of these. Hear at least what they say about the righteous man. "He is grievous to us, even when beheld," (Wis. 2:15) and it is no small beginning of amendment to be tormented at his presence. For if the sight of the righteous man did not torment them, this word would not have been uttered. But to be stung, and pinched in conscience at his presence, would be no little hindrance to indulging in wickedness with pleasure, Dost thou see how great is the gain both to the good from the wicked, and to the wicked from the good? On this account God has not set them apart, but allowed them to be mingled together. - St. John Chrysostom, Concerning the Power of Demons, 3 

Wis. 2:16
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 15

Wis. 2:22, 25
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 12

Wis. 2:23
Further, the Son of God became man, in order that He might again bestow on man that favour for the sake of which He created him. For He created him after His own image, endowed with intellect and free-will, and after His own likeness, that is to say, perfect in all virtue so far as it is possible for man's nature to attain perfection. For the following properties are, so to speak, marks of the divine nature: viz. absence of care and distraction and guile, goodness, wisdom, justice, freedom from all vice. So then, after He had placed man in communion with Himself (for having made him for incorruption (Wis. 2:23) , He led him up through communion with Himself to incorruption), and when moreover, through the transgression of the command we had confused and obliterated the marks of the divine image, and had become evil, we were stripped of our communion with God (for what communion hath light with darkness? (2 Cor. 6:14)): and having been shut out from life we became subject to the corruption of death: yea, since He gave us to share in the better part, and we did not keep it secure, He shares in the inferior part, I mean our own nature, in order that through Himself and in Himself He might renew that which was made after His image and likeness, and might teach us, too, the conduct of a virtuous life, making through Himself the way thither easy for us, and might by the communication of life deliver us from corruption, becoming Himself the firstfruits of our resurrection, and might renovate the useless and worn vessel calling us to the knowledge of God that He might redeem us from the tyranny of the devil, and might strengthen and teach us how to overthrow the tyrant through patience and humility. - St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 4, 4

Wis. 2:24
Such was the lot of Job:  such at first sight his history.  In reality it was a contest between virtue and envy: (Wis. 2:24) the one straining every nerve to overcome the good, the other enduring everything, that it might abide unsubdued; the one striving to smooth the way for vice, by means of the chastisement of the upright, the other to retain its hold upon the good, even if they do exceed others in misfortunes. - St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 21, 18

But He first trained him in many ways and called him back, by groans and trembling, by the deluge of water, and the utter destruction of almost the whole race (Gen. 6:13), by confusion and diversity of tongues (Gen. 6:7), by the rule of angels (Gen. 18:1), by the burning of cities (Gen. 19:1), by figurative manifestations of God, by wars and victories and defeats, by signs and wonders, by manifold faculties, by the law and the prophets: for by all these means God earnestly strove to emancipate man from the wide-spread and enslaving bonds of sin, which had made life such a mass of iniquity, and to effect man's return to a life of happiness. For it was sin that brought death like a wild and savage beast into the world (Wis. 2:24) to the ruin of the human life. But it behoved the Redeemer to be without sin, and not made liable through sin to death, and further, that His nature should be strengthened and renewed, and trained by labour and taught the way of virtue which leads away from corruption to the life eternal and, in the end, is revealed the mighty ocean of love to man that is about Him. - St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 3, 1

Nothing is worse than envy and malice; through these death entered into the world. For when the devil saw man honored, he endured not his prosperity, but used every means to destroy him. (Wis. 2:24) And from the same root one may everywhere see this same fruit produced. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 48 on John

For if man, made after the image and likeness of God, had retained the dignity of his own nature, and had not been deceived by the devil's wiles into transgressing through lust the law laid down for him, the Creator of the world would not have become a Creature, the Eternal would not have entered the sphere of time, nor God the Son, Who is equal with God the Father, have assumed the form of a slave and the likeness of sinful flesh.  But because "by the devil's malice death entered into the world," (Wis. 2:24) and captive humanity could not otherwise be set free without His undertaking our cause, Who without loss of His majesty should both become true Man, and alone have no taint of sin, the mercy of the Trinity divided for Itself the work of our restoration in such a way that the Father should be propitiated, the Son should propitiate, and the Holy Ghost enkindle. - St. Leo the Great, Sermon 77, 2

It is, then, too shameful not to act up to what we are.  Those things, in fact, are ours which we love in others, even though we cannot follow them; and what things are loved in us become theirs that love them. Hence, then, let the envious consider of how great power is charity, which makes ours without labour works of labour not our own.  The envious are therefore to be told that, when they fail to keep themselves from spite, they are being sunk into the old wickedness of the wily foe.  For of him it is written, But by envy of the devil death entered into the world (Wis. 2:24).  For, because he had himself lost heaven, he envied it to created man, and, being himself ruined, by ruining others he heaped up his own damnation. - St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 10

St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 3

Wis. 3:1
The divine Scripture likewise saith that the souls of the just are in God's hand (Wis. 3:1) and death cannot lay hold of them. For death is rather the sleep of the saints than their death. For they travailed in this life and shall to the end (Ps. 40:9-10), and Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of His saints (Ps. 116:15). What then, is more precious than to be in the hand of God? For God is Life and Light, and those who are in God's hand are in life and light. - St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 4, 15

How will He require the blood of man at the hand of every beast, unless because the bodies of dead men will rise again? For not for man will the beasts die. And again to Moses, I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob: God is not the God of the dead (that is, those who are dead and will be no more), but of the living [2731] , whose souls indeed live in His hand [2732] , but whose bodies will again come to life through the resurrection. - St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 4, 27

For if in bodies this were impossible, and one could not make a man's body become that of an ass; much more were this impossible in the invisible soul; neither could one transform it into the substance of an evil spirit. So that these are the sayings of besotted old wives, and spectres to frighten children. Nor indeed is it possible for a soul, torn away from the body, to wander here any more. For "the souls of the righteous are in the hand of God;" (Wis. 3:1) and if of the righteous, then those children's souls also; for neither are they wicked: and the souls too of sinners are straightway led away hence. And it is evident from Lazarus and the rich man; and elsewhere too Christ saith, "This day they require thy soul of thee." (Lk. 12:20) And it may not be that a soul, when it is gone forth from the body, should wander here; nor is the reason hard to see. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 28 on Matthew

Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4, 11

Wis. 3:2-8
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4, 16

Wis. 3:7
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 7: To Peter, Domitian, and Elpidius

Wis. 3:9
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 14

Wis. 3:14
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 14

Wis. 4:8-9
Just as all young men are not alike in fervour of spirit nor equally instructed in learning and good morals, so too we cannot find that all old men are equally perfect and excellent. For the true riches of old men are not to be measured by grey hairs but by their diligence in youth and the rewards of their past labours. "For," says one, "the things that thou hast not gathered in thy youth, how shalt thou find them in thy old age?" "For venerable old age is not that of long time, nor counted by the number of years: but the understanding of a man is grey hairs, and a spotless life is old age." - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 2: Second Conference of Abbot Moses, 13

And indeed if a young man insult [him], he immediately puts forward his gray hairs. Reverence them first thyself; if however thou dost not reverence thy own even when old, how canst thou demand of the young to reverence them? Thou dost not reverence the gray hairs, but puttest them to shame. God hath honored thee with whiteness of hairs: He hath given thee high dignity. Why dost thou betray the honor? How shall the young man reverence thee, when thou art more wanton than he? For the hoary head is then venerable, when it acts worthily of the gray head; but when it plays youth, it will be more ridiculous than the young. How then will you old men be able to give these exhortations to the young man when you are intoxicated by your disorderliness? I say not these things as accusing the old, but the young. For in my judgment they who act thus even if they have come to their hundredth year, are young; just as the young if they be but little children, yet if they are sober-minded, are better than the old. And this doctrine is not my own, but Scripture also recognizes the same distinction. "For," it says, "honorable age is not that which standeth in length of time, and an unspotted life is old age." (Wis. 4:8-9) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 7 on Hebrews

Wis. 4:11-14
Bl. Jerome, Letter 79:To Salvina, 2

Wis. 4:13
Bl. Jerome, Letter 54:To Furia, 2

Wis. 4:17
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 14

Wis. 5:3-5
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 14

Wis. 5:3
For tell me, if a traveler having got before his servants, were sitting a little space in the inn waiting for them, and then the innkeeper, or some travelers, should behave rudely to him, and revile him, would he not laugh at the other's ignorance? would not their mistake rather give him pleasure? would he not feel a satisfaction as though not he but some one else were insulted? Let us too behave thus. We too sit in an inn, waiting for our friends who travel the same road; when we are all collected, then they shall know whom they insult. These men then shall hang their heads; then they shall say, "This is he whom we" fools "had in derision." (Wis. 5:3) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 79 on John

Wis. 6:7
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 16

Wis. 6:10
First, that they stumble in reference to the highest of things--namely, the mind's free choice. "For they," it is said, "who keep holy holy things, shall be made holy; and those who have been taught will find an answer." (Wis. 6:10) For the Gnostic alone will do holily, in accordance with reason all that has to be done, as he hath learned through the Lord's teaching, received through men. Again, on the other hand, we may hear: "For in His hand, that is, in His power and wisdom, are both we and our words, and all wisdom and skill in works; for God loves nothing but the man that dwells with wisdom." (Wis. 7:16) And again, they have not read what is said by Solomon; for, treating of the construction of the temple, he says expressly, "And it was Wisdom as artificer that framed it; and Thy providence, O Father, governs throughout." (Wis. 14:2-3) And how irrational, to regard philosophy as inferior to architecture and shipbuilding! - Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 11

Wis. 6:12-15
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 15

Wis. 6:16
A mighty ally and protector, therefore, have we from God; a great Teacher of the Church, a mighty Champion on our behalf.  Let us not be afraid of the demons, nor of the devil; for mightier is He who fighteth for us.  Only let us open to Him our doors; for He goeth about seeking such as are worthy (Wis. 6:16)  and searching on whom He may confer His gifts. - St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 16, 19

Wis. 6:17-18
He who eats of this meal, the best of all, shall possess the kingdom of God, fixing his regards here on the holy assembly of love, the heavenly Church. Love, then, is something pure and worthy of God, and its work is communication. "And the care of discipline is love," as Wisdom says; "and love is the keeping of the law." (Wis. 6:17-18) And these joys have an inspiration of love from the public nutriment, which accustoms to everlasting dainties. Love , then, is not a supper. But let the entertainment depend on love. For it is said, "Let the children whom Thou hast loved, O Lord, learn that it is not the products of fruits that nourish man; but it is Thy word which preserves those who believe on Thee." (Wis. 16:26) - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 1

Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 15

Wis. 7:1
But what was it? It was, that we might not say, when exhorted to the same virtue, that they were partakers of another nature, or were not men. On this account, a certain one speaking of the great Elias, says, "Elias was a man of like passions with us." (James 5:17) Do you perceive, that he shows from a communion of suffering, that he was the same kind of man that we are? And again, "I too am a man of like passions with you." (Wis. 7:1) And this guarantees a community of nature. - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies on the Statues, 1

St. John Cassian, The Institutes, Book 12: Of the Pride of Spirit

Wis. 7:10
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10

Wis. 7:16
First, that they stumble in reference to the highest of things--namely, the mind's free choice. "For they," it is said, "who keep holy holy things, shall be made holy; and those who have been taught will find an answer." (Wis. 6:10) For the Gnostic alone will do holily, in accordance with reason all that has to be done, as he hath learned through the Lord's teaching, received through men. Again, on the other hand, we may hear: "For in His hand, that is, in His power and wisdom, are both we and our words, and all wisdom and skill in works; for God loves nothing but the man that dwells with wisdom." (Wis. 7:16) And again, they have not read what is said by Solomon; for, treating of the construction of the temple, he says expressly, "And it was Wisdom as artificer that framed it; and Thy providence, O Father, governs throughout." (Wis. 14:2-3) And how irrational, to regard philosophy as inferior to architecture and shipbuilding! - Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 11

Wis. 7:17-22
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2, 2
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 8

Wis. 7:24
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 5, 14

Wis. 8:7
Bl. Jerome, Letter 64:To Pammachius, 3

Wis. 9:13, 17
But if those who are perfect do not yet understand the very things in their hands, and at their feet, and before their eyes, and on the earth, and especially the rule followed with respect to the hairs of their head, how can we believe them regarding things spiritual, and super-celestial, (Wis. 9:13, 17) and those which, with a vain confidence, they assert to be above God? - Ireneaus, Against Heresies, 2, 28

Wis. 9:14
And I know indeed that what now has been said cannot by many be comprehended, and therefore it is that in many places we avoid agitating questions of human reasonings, because the rest of the people cannot follow such arguments, and if they could, still they have nothing firm or sure in them. "For the thoughts of mortal men are miserable, and our devices are but uncertain." (Wis. 9:14) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on John

Wis. 9:15
And so the nous, i.e., the mind, is... ever shifting and very shifting: as it is thus described in the so called wisdom of Solomon... "And the earthly tabernacle weigheth down the mind that museth on many things." (Wis. 9:15) This then in accordance with its nature can never remain idle, but unless provision is made where it may exercise its motions and have what will continually occupy it, it must by its own fickleness wander about and stray over all kinds of things until, accustomed by long practice and daily use--in which you say that you have toiled without result--it tries and learns what food for the memory it ought to prepare, toward which it may bring back its unwearied flight and acquire strength for remaining, and thus may succeed in driving away the hostile suggestion of the enemy by which it is distracted, and in persisting in that state and condition which it yearns for. - St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 7: First Conference of Abbot Serenus, 4

St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 7: To Peter, Domitian, and Elpidius

Wis. 10:1
Bl. Jerome, Letter 144:From Augustine to Optatus, 5
St. John Cassian, The Institutes, Book 12: Of the Pride of Spirit

Wis. 10:7
Bl. jerome, Letter 122:To Rusticus, 1

Wis. 10:8
St. John Chrysostom, Homily 18 on Second Corinthians

Wis. 11:20
St. Basil, On the Spirit, 17

Wis. 11:23
See, how many maimed are there! and this is sufficient to lead us to pity. Nothing so much pleases God as mercy. Wherefore with this the priests were anointed, and the kings, and the prophets, for they had, in oil, a type of God's love to man; and they further learnt, that rulers should have a greater share of mercy. It showed that the Spirit is to come to men through mercy, since God pities and is kind to man. For, "Thou hast mercy upon all," it is written, "for Thou canst do all things." (Wis. 11:23) For this cause they were anointed with oil: and indeed it was from mercy He appointed the priesthood. And kings were anointed with oil; and would one praise a ruler, he can make mention of nothing so becoming him as mercy. For pity is peculiar to power. Consider that the world was established by pity, and then imitate thy Lord. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on Philippians

Wis. 11:24
 In this respect, therefore, the Lord the Instructor is most good and unimpeachable, sympathizing as He does from the exceeding greatness of His love with the nature of each man. "For there is nothing which the Lord hates." (Wis. 11:24) For assuredly He does not hate anything, and yet wish that which He hates to exist. Nor does He wish anything not to exist, and yet become the cause of existence to that which He wishes not to exist. Nor does He wish anything not to exist which yet exists. If, then, the Word hates anything, He does not wish it to exist. But nothing exists, the cause of whose existence is not supplied by God. Nothing, then, is hated by God, nor yet by the Word. - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8

St. John Chrysostom, Homily 4 on Philippians

Wis. 12:5
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 1, 13

Wis. 12:12
He established all things, and by His word He can overthrow them. "Who shall say unto Him, What hast thou done? or, Who shall resist the power of His strength?" (Wis. 12:12; 11:22) When and as He pleases He will do all things, and none of the things determined by Him shall pass away. All things are open before Him, and nothing can be hidden from His counsel. "The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament showeth His handy-work. Day unto day uttereth speech, and night unto night showeth knowledge. And there are no words or speeches of which the voices are not heard." (Ps. 19:1-3) - St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 27
   

Wis. 13:5
The Divine Nature then it is impossible to see with eyes of flesh:  but from the works, which are Divine, it is possible to attain to some conception of His power, according to Solomon, who says, For by the greatness and beauty of the creatures proportionably the Maker of them is seen. (Wis. 13:5)  He said not that from the creatures the Maker is seen, but added proportionably.  For God appears the greater to every man in proportion as he has grasped a larger survey of the creatures:  and when his heart is uplifted by that larger survey, he gains withal a greater conception of God. - St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 9, 2

These points my discourse has now treated at large, having left out many, yea, ten thousand other things, and especially things incorporeal and invisible, that thou mayest abhor those who blaspheme the wise and good Artificer, and from what is spoken and read, and whatever thou canst thyself discover or conceive, from the greatness and beauty of the creatures mayest proportionably see the maker of them, (Wis. 13:5) and bending the knee with godly reverence to the Maker of the worlds, the worlds, I mean, of sense and thought, both visible and invisible, thou mayest with a grateful and holy tongue, with unwearied lips and heart, praise God and say, How wonderful are Thy works, O Lord; in wisdom hast Thou made them all. (Ps. 104:24)  - St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 9, 16

The Devil then is acknowledged, as I said, to be evil by all. What shall we say about this beautiful and wondrous creation? Pray is the creation too, wicked? and who is so corrupt, who so dull, and demented as to accuse the creation? what then shall we say about this? For it is not wicked, but is both beautiful and a token of the wisdom and power and lovingkindness of God. Hear at least how the prophet marvels at it, saying, "How are thy works magnified O Lord! in wisdom Thou hast made them all." (Ps. 104:24) He did go through them one by one, but withdrew before the incomprehensible wisdom of God. And that he has made it thus beautiful and vast hear a certain one saying, "From the vastness and beauty of the creatures, the originator of them is proportionably seen." (Wis. 13:5) - St. John Chrysostom, Concerning the Power of Demons, 2

But what he means is just this, He hath placed His Creation in the midst, before the eyes of all men; in order that they may guess at the Creator from His works; which, indeed, another writer has referred to; "For from the greatness and beauty of the creatures, proportionably the Maker of them is seen." (Wis. 13:5) Seest thou the greatness? Marvel at the power of Him that made it! Seest thou the beauty? be astonished at the wisdom which adorned it! - St. John Chrysostom, Homilies On the Statues, 9

St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 1, 7
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 1, 1

Wis. 14:2-3
First, that they stumble in reference to the highest of things--namely, the mind's free choice. "For they," it is said, "who keep holy holy things, shall be made holy; and those who have been taught will find an answer." (Wis. 6:10) For the Gnostic alone will do holily, in accordance with reason all that has to be done, as he hath learned through the Lord's teaching, received through men. Again, on the other hand, we may hear: "For in His hand, that is, in His power and wisdom, are both we and our words, and all wisdom and skill in works; for God loves nothing but the man that dwells with wisdom." (Wis. 7:16) And again, they have not read what is said by Solomon; for, treating of the construction of the temple, he says expressly, "And it was Wisdom as artificer that framed it; and Thy providence, O Father, governs throughout." (Wis. 14:2-3) And how irrational, to regard philosophy as inferior to architecture and shipbuilding! - Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 11

Wis. 14:16
We will examine, if you please, whence idolatry took its rise. A certain wise man (Wis. 14:16) tells us, that a certain rich man afflicted with untimely mourning for his son, and having no consolation for his sorrow, consoled his passion in this way: having made a lifeless image of the dead, and constantly gazing at it, he seemed through the image to have his departed one still; whilst certain flatterers, "whose God was their belly" (Phil. 3:19), treating the image with reverence in order to do him honor, carried on the custom into idolatry. So then it took its rise from weakness of soul, from a senseless custom, from extravagance. But not so covetousness: from weakness of soul indeed it is, only that it is from a worse weakness. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 18 on Ephesians

Wis. 16:26
He who eats of this meal, the best of all, shall possess the kingdom of God, fixing his regards here on the holy assembly of love, the heavenly Church. Love, then, is something pure and worthy of God, and its work is communication. "And the care of discipline is love," as Wisdom says; "and love is the keeping of the law." (Wis. 6:17-18) And these joys have an inspiration of love from the public nutriment, which accustoms to everlasting dainties. Love , then, is not a supper. But let the entertainment depend on love. For it is said, "Let the children whom Thou hast loved, O Lord, learn that it is not the products of fruits that nourish man; but it is Thy word which preserves those who believe on Thee." (Wis. 16:26) - Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 1

Wis. 17:26
The Apostle calls Christ the image of the Father, and Arius says that He is unlike the Father. Why, then, is He called an image, if He hath no likeness? Men will not have their portraits unlike them, and Arius contends that the Father is unlike the Son, and would have it that the Father has begotten one unlike Himself, as though unable to generate His like. The prophets say: "In Thy light we shall see light;" (Ps. 36:9) and again: "Wisdom is the brightness of everlasting light, and the spotless mirror of God's majesty, the image of His goodness." (Wis. 17:26) - St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 1, 7

Wis. 18:15
But be not thou weary, beloved, for if any one were describing a visible war, and trophies, and victories, wouldest thou feel no satiety at all; nay, thou wouldest not prefer either drink or meat to this history. But if that kind of narrative be welcome, much more this. For consider what a thing it is to hear, how on the one side God from Heaven, arising "out of the royal thrones, leaped down" unto the earth, and even unto hell itself, and stood in the battle array; and how the devil on the other hand set himself in array against Him; or rather not against God unveiled, but God hidden in man's nature. - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 2 on Matthew

Wis. 19:20
And when we fall into perplexity, then are we delivered, even though we come to death itself, even though our condition be desperate. For what else was left [for them]? They were unarmed, compassed about by the Egyptians and the sea; and they must either be drowned if they fled, or fall into the hands of the Egyptians. But nevertheless [He] saved them from impossibilities. That which was spread under the one as land, overwhelmed the others as sea. In the former case it forgot its nature: in the latter it even armed itself against them. (cf Wis. 10:20) - St. John Chrysostom, Homily 27 on Hebrews
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« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2009, 09:55:54 AM »

You're awesome and I love you. You can't believe how much of a help this is. Smiley
Don't let your current knowledhe get wasted, even if you're not an Orthodox. Consider becoming a scholar. Wink
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« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2009, 04:09:23 PM »

Thanks for putting this here, Asteriktos.

Obviously the Church Fathers didn't get Luther's memo that this stuff should have been excised from the Scriptures.
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« Reply #18 on: January 07, 2010, 04:41:38 PM »

Don't forget, the only scritpural warrant for Hanukkah is Maccabees, Sirach was commented on in the Talmud.
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« Reply #19 on: January 07, 2010, 08:03:01 PM »

Thanks for putting this here, Asteriktos.

Obviously the Church Fathers didn't get Luther's memo that this stuff should have been excised from the Scriptures.
Grin Love it.
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« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2011, 01:19:15 PM »

I finished sorting through some of the quotes and references from above to verify whether they were actual quotations or not, and added some other references as well. I've done up till around the time of the First Ecumenical Council...


St. Clement of Rome (1st century)
St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 55 - Judith 8 - Discusses the actions of Judith
St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 3 - Wis. 2:24 - possible allusion
St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 27 - Wis. 12:12 - possible quote
St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 34 - Sir. 4:29 - possible quote

Didache (c. 100)
Didache, 4 - Sir. 4:31 - quotes it

St. Ignatius of Antioch (c. 50-107)
St. Ignatius, Epistle to the Magnesians, 3 - Sus. 52 - possible allusion

Pseudo-Barnabas (2nd Century)
Pseudo-Barnabas, Epistle of Barnabas, 6 - Wis. 2:12 - introduced a combined quote of Is. 3:9 and Wis. 2:12 with the phrase “the prophet speaks against Israel”, but is probably confused about the origin of the Wisdom quote, but it does show that he knew of Wisdom and had read it enough to quote from memory
Pseudo-Barnabas, Epistle of Barnabas, 19 - Sir. 4:31 - quotes it

St. Polycarp (c. 69-155)
St. Polycarp, Epistle to the Philippians, 10 - seems to quote Tobit 4:10 and/or 12:9

Tatian (c. 120-180)
Tatian, Address to the Greeks, 7 - alludes to Wis. 2:23

St. Irenaeus (c. 125-202)
St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 4, 5, 2 - Bel and the Dragon (Daniel 12:4-5) - quotes it as being written by Daniel
St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 4, 26, 3 - Sus. 56 - quotes it and says it is “found in Daniel the prophet”
St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 5, 35, 1 - Bar. 4:36-5:9 - talks about it as being by “Jeremiah the prophet” and quotes at length
St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 2, 28, 9 - Wis. 9:17 - possible allusion
St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 4, 20, 4 - Baruch 3:38 - possible allusion
St. Irenaeus, Demonstration of the Apostolic Preaching, 97 - quotes Bar. 3:29-4:1 - introduces the quote by saying “Jeremiah saith concerning her”
St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 4, 38, 3 - Wis. 6:19 - possible allusion

St. Clement of Alexandria (c. 150-215)
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 1, 4 - Sir. 1:1 - quotes it as from the Wisdom of Jesus
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 1, 10 - Sir. 19:22 - quotes it as from the Wisdom of Jesus
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 1, 21 - Bel and the Dragon - quotes as though an authentic part of Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2, 2 - Wis. 7:17-22 - quotes as from the “book of Wisdom”
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2, 5 - Sir. 15:10 - quotes but misattributes to Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2, 5 - Sir. 6:33 - quotes but misattributes to Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2, 7 - Judith 8:27 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2, 15 - Sir. 1:27 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2, 23 - Tobit 4:15 - quotes passage as “Scripture”
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4, 11 - Wis. 3:1 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4, 16 - Wis. 3:2-8 - quotes passage and introduces with “the divine Wisdom says of the  martyrs”
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 4, 19- Judith - mentions her as an example of faith
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 5, 3 - Sir. 27:12 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 5, 14 - Wis. 2:12 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 5, 14 - Wis. 7:24 - quotes passage as from book of Wisdom
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 8 - Wis. 7:17-22 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 11 - Wis. 6:10 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 11 - Wis. 7:16 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 11 - Wis. 14:2-3 - quotes passage as from Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 12 - Tobit 12:8 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 12 - Wis. 2:22, 25 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 14 - Wis. 3:9 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 14 - Wis. 3:14 - quotes passage as from Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 14 - Wis. 4:17 - quotes passage and attributes to Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 14 - Wis. 5:3-5 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 15 - Wis. 2:16 - quotes passage as from Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 15 - Wis. 6:12-15 - quotes passage as from Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 6, 15 - Wis. 6:17-18 - quotes passage as from Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8 - Sir. 1:18 - quotes passage as from the book of Wisdom
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8 - Sir. 1:22 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8 - Sir. 16:12 - quotes passage as from the book of Wisdom
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8 - Sir. 21:6 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8 - Sir. 22:6-8 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8 - Sir. 34:14-15 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 8 - Wis. 11:24 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9 - Sir. 7:23-24 - quotes passage as from book of Wisdom
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9 - Sir. 16:12 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9 - Sir. 18:13-14 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9 - Sir. 30:8 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 9 - Sir. 32:21 - quotes passage and misattributes to Solomon
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1, 13 - Sir. 33:6 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 1 - Sir. 18:32 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 1 - Wis. 6:17-18 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 1 - Wis. 16:26 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2 - Sir. 26:8 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 2 - Sir. 31:19-29 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 3 - Bar. 3:16-19 - quotes passage and called it Divine Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 4 - Sir. 34:15-16 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 5 - Sir. 21:20 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 6 - Sir. 20:5-8 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7 - Sir. 14:1 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7 - Sir. 9:9 - quotes passage as from Wisdom
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7 - Sir. 9:15 - quotes passage as from Wisdom
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7 - Sir. 9:18 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7 - Sir. 31:16-18 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7 - Sir. 31:31 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7 - Sir. 32:3-8 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 7 - Sir. 32:11 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 8 - Sir. 38:1-2, 8 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 8 - Sir. 39:13-14 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 8 - Sir. 39:26-27 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10 - Sir. 18:30 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10 - Sir. 19:2-5 -  quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10 - Sir. 23:4-6 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10 - Sir. 23:18-19 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 10 - Wis. 7:10 - possible allusion to passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2, 11 - Sir. 11:4 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 3 - Sir. 25:6 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 4 - Sir. 9:16 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 4 - Sir. 11:29 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 11 - Sir. 9:8 - quotes passage as Scripture
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 11 - Sir. 26:9 - quotes passage
Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 3, 11 - Sir. 21:21 - quotes passage as Scripture

Tertullian (c. 160-220)
Tertullian, On Prayer, 16 - Tobit 12:12 - May refer to Tob. 12:12, or it may refer to other Scriptures (Lk. 1:11; Rev. 8:3-4)
Tertullian, Antidote for the Scorpion’s Sting - Bar. 6:3-5 - quotes of the book and attributes the words to Jeremiah
Tertullian, On Monogamy, 17 - mentions Judith
Tertullian, Against the Valentinians, 2 - Wis. 1:1 - quotes and says it is by Solomon
Tertullian, Against Marcion, 3, 22 - Wis. 2:12 - quotes it
Tertullian, Prescription Against the Heretics, 7 - Wis. 1:1 quotes it as coming from “the porch of Solomon”
Tertullian, On Fasting, 7 - Bel 31-39 - mentions passage as though an authentic part of Daniel

St. Hippolytus (?-236)
St. Hippolytus, Exegetical Fragments, On Susannah - did commentary on Susannah from Daniel, in which he also mentions Tobias, Sarah and Raphael from Tobit (Exegetical Fragments, On Susannah, 55)
St. Hippolytus, Exegetical Fragments, On Daniel, 3 - mentions 1 Maccabees

Pope Callixtus (3rd century)
Pope Callixtus, Epistles, 2, 5 - Tobit 4:15 - quotes it and introduces it as “sacred scripture”

Origen (c. 185-254)
Origen, Letter To Africanus, 13 - Tobit 1:12-22 - quotes it, says the Jews do not use it or have it in their canon, but that “the Churches use” the book
Origen, Letter To Africanus, 7 - Mentions the story of Susanna
Origen, Against Celcus, 5, 19 - Tobit 12:7 - quotes the book by name
Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of John, 2, 16 - Judith 9:2 - alludes to passage
Origen, Against Celcus, 5, 29 - Wis. 10:5 and Wis. 1:4 - quotes them and says that they are from the “treatise of Solomon”
Origen, Against Celcus, 3, 60 - Wis. 1:4 - quotes passage
Origen, Against Celcus, 7, 8 - Wis. 1:5 - quotes passage
Origen, Against Celcus, 4, 5 - Wis. 1:7 - quotes passage
Origen, First Principles, 3, 1 - Wis. 7:16 - quotes passage and calls it Scripture
Origen, First Principles, 1, 2 - Wis. 7:25 and again Wis. 7:25-26 - quotes passage as coming from Wisdom of Solomon
Origen, Against Celcus, 3, 72 - Wis. 7:25-26 - quotes passage and introduces it as “the word of God”
Origen, Against Celcus, 8, 14 - Wis. 7:25-26 - quotes passage as establishing “who the Son of God is”
Origen, Against Celcus, 6, 13 - Wis. 9:6 - quotes passage
Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew, 10, 19 - Wis. 9:6 - quotes passage
Origen, First Principles, 4, 33 - Wis. 11:17 - quotes passage as from Wisdom of Solomon, but says that it is “a work which is certainly not esteemed authoritative by all,” and seems to indicate that he doesn’t consider it part of the Bible canon
Origen, First Principles, 2, 9 - Wis. 11:20 - quotes passage as Scripture
Origen, Against Celcus, 4, 28 - Wis. 11:26-12:1-2 - quotes passage
Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of John, 6, 36 - Wis. 17:1 - quotes passage
Origen, First Principles, 2, 3 - Wis. 18:24 - quotes is as being found in Wisdom of Solomon
Origen, First Principles, 2, 8 - Sir. 6:4 - quotes as though part of “holy Scripture”
Origen, Against Celcus, 8, 50 - Sir. 10:19 - quotes with the introduction “the divine word says”
Origen, First Principles, 4, 26 - Sir. 16:21 - possible allusion
Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of John, 6, 20 - Sir. 18:7 - quotes as Sirach
Origen, Against Celcus, 4, 28 - Sir. 18:13 - quotes passage
Origen, Commentary on Matthew, 12, 22 - Sir. 18:30 - quotes passage
Origen, Against Celcus, 6, 7 - Sir. 21:18 - quotes passage as part of “holy Scripture”
Origen, Against Celcus, 7, 12 - Sir. 21:18 - quotes passage
Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew, 13, 4 - Sir. 27:11 - quotes passage as in the “Book of Wisdom”
Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew, 11, 12 - Sir. 28:25 - alludes to the passage
Origen, Against Celcus, 4, 75 - Sir. 39:16-17, 21 - quotes passage but doesn’t know the origin, introducing it thus: “one of our own wise men says somewhere”
Origen, First Principles, 2, 8 - Sir. 43:20 - quotes passage as “holy Scripture” and coming from “the book of Wisdom”
Origen, First Principles, 2, 1 - 2 Macc. 7:28 - calls Maccabees by name “Holy Scripture”
Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of John, 1, 18 - 2 Macc. 7:28 - alludes to passage

Anonymous (c. 255)
Anonymous, A Treatise Against the Heretic Novatian: That the Hope of Pardon Should Not Be Denied to the Lapsed, 18 - quotes Sir. 2:10-11 as having divine authority or inspiration

St. Cyprian of Carthage (c. 208-258)
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 1 - Tob. 2:2 and Tob. 4:5-11 - quotes as from Tobit
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 6 - Tobit 2:14 - quotes passage by name
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 62 - Tobit 4:12 - quotes passage by name
St. Cyprian, Treatise 7, 10 - Tobit 2:14 - quotes passage
St. Cyprian, Treatise 7, 10 - Tobit 12:11-15 - quotes passage and speaks as though they are the authentic words of the Archangel Raphael
St. Cyprian, Treatise 8, 5 - Tobit 12:8-9 - quotes and says that they are the words of “Raphael the angel” and speaks as though they are authentic
St. Cyprian, Treatise 8, 20 - Tob. 4:5-11 and Tob. 14:10-11 - Quotes it as being from Tobit
St. Cyprian, Treatise 4, 33 - Tobit 12:12-15 - Quotes as being from Tobit and being spoken by “Raphael the angel”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 4, 32 - Tob. 20:8 - quotes as “Holy Scripture”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 11, 11 - Tobit 13:6 - quotes and attributes to Tobit
St. Cyprian, Epistle 51, 22 - Tob. 4:10 - quoted and introduced as being from the “Lord”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 4 - 1 Macc. 2:62-63 and 2 Macc. 9:12 - quotes and says they are “in the Maccabees”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 11, 11 - 2 Macc. 6:30 and 2 Macc. 7:9-27 - quotes passage
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 15 - 1 Macc. 2:52 - quotes as being in the Maccabees
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 17 - 2 Macc. 6:30 and 2 Macc. 7:9-19 - quotes as being from the Maccabees
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 53 - 1 Macc. 2:60 - quoted as from the Maccabees
St. Cyprian, Epistle 54, 3 - 1 Macc. 2:62-63 - quotes as part of “Holy Scripture”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 8, 5 - Sir. 29:12 - quotes and attributes to Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 8, 2 - Sir. 3:30 - quotes and introduces it with the words (along with a previous text) “The Holy Spirit speaks in the Sacred Scripture”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 9, 17 - Sir. 2:4-5 - quotes passage
St. Cyprian, Treatise 11, 9 - Sir. 27:5 - quotes and attributes to Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 2, 1 - Sir. 24:7 - quotes passage
Treatise 12, Book 3, 1 - quotes Sir. 3:30 as though it’s part of Proverbs, but a short time later quotes Sir. 14:11 and Sir. 29:12 as being in Sirach
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 20 - Sir. 1:14 - quotes but seems to misattribute it to the Wisdom of Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 6 - Sir. 27:5 - quotes and attributes to Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 12 - Sir. 23:11 - quotes and attributes to Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 35 - Sir. 5:4 - quotes and introduces it as “In Solomon, in Ecclesiasticus”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book, 51 - Sir. 10:26 - Quotes with the introduction “In Solomon, in Ecclesiasticus”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 53 - Sir. 3:21 - quoted and attributed to Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 53 - Sir. 7:17 - quoted and attributed to Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 95 - Sir. 9:16 - quotes as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 95 - Sir. 6:16 - quotes as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 95 - Sir. 9:13 - quotes as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 95 - Sir. 25:9 -  quotes as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 95 - Sir. 28:24 - quotes as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 96 - Sir. 4:29 - quoted as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 97 - Sir. 5:7 - quoted as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 109 - Sir. 7:39 - quoted as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 110 - Sir. 28:15 - quoted as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 111 - Sir. 34:19 - quoted as from Ecclesiasticus by Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 113 - Sir. 4:10 - quoted as from Solomon
St. Cyprian, Epistle 68, 7 - Sir. 28:24 - quotes passage
St. Cyprian, Epistle 54, 21 - Sir. 28:24 - quoted being introduced as “the Holy Spirit speaks through Solomon”
St. Cyprian, Epistle 64, 2 - Sir. 7:29, 31 - quoted and introduced with “Solomon, established in the Holy Spirit, testifies and teaches”
St. Cyprian, Epistle 70, 1 - Sir. 34:25 - quotes it as valid for establishing doctrine
Seventh Council of Carthage (258) - quotes Sir. 34:25 and says it is “written in Solomon”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 11, 11 - Bel 5 - quotes and introduces with the words: “Daniel, devoted to God, and filled with the Holy Spirit, exclaims and says”
St. Cyprian, Epistle 55, 5 - Bel 5 - quotes passage
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 20 - Sus. 1-3 - quotes as being in Daniel
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 20 - Song of the Three Children 14-19 - quotes as being in Daniel
St. Cyprian, Treatise 4, 5 - Bar. 6:6 - quotes it and introduces the passage by saying: “The Holy Spirit, moreover, suggests these same things by Jeremiah, and teaches, saying”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 7, 23 - Wis. 4:11 - quotes and introduces it as “the Holy Spirit teaches by Solomon”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 10, 4 - Wis. 2:24 - quotes passage
St. Cyprian, Treatise 11, 1 - Wis. 15:15-17 - quotes passage as coming from Wisdom of Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 11, 1 - Wis. 13:1-4 - quotes passage and attributes to Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 11, 12 - Wis. 3:4-8 - quotes passage and introduces it by saying “The Holy Spirit shows and predicts by Solomon, saying”
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, 2, 14 - Wis. 2:12-22 - quotes as from the Wisdom of Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 15 - Wis. 3:4-8 - quotes as Wisdom of Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 16 - Wis. 5:1-9 - quotes it but attributes it to Proverbs
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 53 - Wis. 1:1 - quoted and attributed to Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 58 - Wis. 4:11, 14 - quotes as being from the Wisdom of Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 59 - Wis. 15:15-17 - quotes as from Wisdom of Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 59 - Wis. 13:1-4 - quotes passage
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 66 - Wis. 3:11 - quoted as from Wisdom of Solomon
St. Cyprian, Treatise 12, Book 3, 112 - Wis. 6:6 - quoted as being from Solomon
St. Cyprian, Epistle 51, 22 - Wis. 1:13 - quoted as though through divine revelation
St. Cyprian, Epistle 61, 1 - Wis. 3:11 - quotes passage
St. Cyrian, Epistle 80, 2 - Wis. 3:4-8 - quoted and introduced as “sacred Scripture”

St. Dionysius of Alexandria (c. 200-265)
St. Dionysius of Alexandria, (Fragments) Books on Nature, 3 - Sir. 16:24-25 - quotes passage with the introduction “listen to the divine oracles”
St. Dionysius of Alexandria, (Fragments) Books on Nature, 5 - Sir. 16:27-28 - quotes passage
St. Dionysius of Alexandria, (Fragments) Epistle to Bishop Dionysius of Rome, 4 - Wis. 7:25 - quotes passage
St. Dionysius of Alexandria, (Fragments) Epistle 10: Against Bishop Germanus, 4 - Tob. 12:7 - alludes to passage

Archelaus (3rd Century)
Archelaus, The Acts of the Disputation With the Heresiarch Manes, 29 - Wis. 1:13 - quotes passage

St. Victorinus (c. ?-304)
St. Victorinus, On the Creation of the World - 1 Macc. 2:31-41 - alluded to

St. Methodius of Olympus (c. ?-311)
St. Methodius of Olympus, (Extracts From) Work on Things Created, 9 - Sir. 1:2 - quotes passage as from Sirach
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Marcella, 1 - Sir. 6:36 - may allude to passage
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Thallousa, 4 - Sir. 6:36 - may allude to passage
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Marcella, 3 - Sir. 19:2 - quotes passage
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Marcella, 3 - Sir. 23: 1, 4, 6 - quotes passage
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Thekla, 3 - Bar. 3:14-15 - quotes passage as by Jeremiah
St. Methodius of Olympus, Oration Concerning Simeon and Anna, 10 - Bar. 3:24-25 - possible allusion, attributed to an “illustrious prophet”
St. Methodius of Olympus, Discourse on the Resurrection, 1, 8 - Wis. 1:14 - quoted passage as from the “Book of Wisdom”
St. Methodius of Olympus, Discourse on the Resurrection, 1, 11 - Wis. 2:23 - quoted passage as from the “Book of Wisdom”
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Theophila, 3 - Wis. 3:16 - quoted as Scripture
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Marcella, 3 - Wis. 4:1-2 - passage quoted and introduce with the words: “And in the Book of Wisdom, a book full of all virtue, the Holy Spirit, now openly drawing his hearers to continence and chastity, since on this wise”
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Theopatra, 5 - Wis. 4:2 - passage quoted
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Agathe, 5 - Wis. 4:2 - alludes to passage
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Marcella, 3 - Wis. 4:3 - passage quoted
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Theophila, 6 - Wis. 4:6 - quotes passage
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Arete, 1 - Wis. 7:9 - quotes passage
St. Methodius of Olympus, (Other Fragments), 5 - Wis. 12:1 - quoted as by Solomon
St. Methodius of Olympus, Oration Concerning Simeon and Anna, 6 - Wis. 15:3 - quotes passage
St. Methodius of Olympus, Concerning Chastity, Theophila, 7 - Wis. 15:10-11 - quotes passage and introduces it with the words “And those artificers who, to the destruction of men, make images in human form, not perceiving and knowing their own Maker, are blamed by the Word, which says, in the Book of Wisdom, a book full of all virtue”

St. Peter of Alexandria (c. 260-311)
St. Peter of Alexandria, Fragments, 5 - Sir. 20:18 - quotes passage

St. Alexander of Alexandria (c. ?-328)
St. Alexander of Alexandria, Epistles on the Arian Heresy, 1, 5 - Sir. 1:2 - quotes passage
St. Alexander of Alexandria, Epistles on the Arian Heresy, 1, 5 - Sir. 3:20 - quotes passage

Lactantius (c. 260-330)
Lactantius, The Divine Institutes, 4, 16 - Wis. 2:12-22 - quotes passage and attributes to Solomon
Lactantius, The Divine Institutes, 4, 13 - Bar. 3:35-37 - quotes passage as by Jeremiah
Lactantius, The Divine Institutes, 4, 8 - Sir. 24:5-7 - quotes passage as by Solomon
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ialmisry
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« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2011, 02:42:08 PM »

My, someone has been busy. Thanks.
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« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2011, 05:17:12 PM »

A great job! This is a great list of references.
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« Reply #23 on: March 10, 2011, 04:12:01 PM »

I finished up through St. Gregory of Nyssa. Next are the somewhat longer Sts. Jerome and Ambrose, and then the big one: St. John Chrysostom, who will probably take me twice as long as the writers from the first 3-4 centuries put together.

Aphraates (c. 270-345)
Aphraates, Demonstration 5: Of Wars - 2 Macc. 5:26-27 - mentions content from book
Aphraates, Demonstration 5: Of Wars - 2 Macc. 6:2-31 - mentions content from book
Aphraates, Demonstration 21: Of Persecution - 2 Macc. 6:2-31 - mentions content from book
Aphraates, Demonstration 21: Of Persecution - 2 Macc. 7 - mentions content from book
Aphraates, Demonstration 5: Of Wars - 2 Macc. 7 - mentions content from book
Aphraates, Demonstration 5: Of Wars - 2 Macc. 9:5-28 - mentions content from book
Aphraates, Demonstration 22 - Sir. 29:18 - quotes passage

St. Hilary of Poitiers (c. 300-368)
St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 1, 7 - Wis. 13:5 - quotes passage as by a prophet
St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 4, 16 - 2 Macc. 7 - quotes passage as by a prophet
St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 4, 42 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes passage as by Jeremiah
St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 5, 39 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes passage as by Jeremiah

St. Athanasius of Alexander (c. 293-373)
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 4 - Sus. 42 - alludes to passage
St. Athanasius, Letter 4, 2 - Judith 13 - mentions passage
St. Athanasius, Defense of the Nicene Definition, 3 - Bar. 3:12 - quotes passage as being by “the Word”
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 13 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes as by Baruch
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 19 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes as by Baruch
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 4 - Bar. 4:20-22 - quotes as by Baruch
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 22 - Sir. 1:9-10
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 1 - Sir. 4:24 - quotes as from “Wisdom”
St. Athanasius, Defense Against the Arians, 6 - Sir. 4:28 - alludes to passage
St. Athanasius, Defense Before Constantius, 2 - Sir. 7:5 - alludes to or quotes passage as though divinely inspired
St. Athanasius, History of the Arians, 7 - Sir. 7:5 - quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 14 - Sir. 12:14 - misattributes to Solomon and Ecclesiastes
St. Athanasius, To the Bishops of Egypt, 1 - Sir. 15:9 - alludes to passage
St. Athanasius, Letter 7, 4 - Sir. 15:9 - alludes to passage
St. Athanasius, Letter 19, 5 - Sir. 18:17 - quotes passage but misattributes to Samuel
St. Athanasius, Defense Against the Arians, 5 - Sir. 30:4 - quotes passage with the introduction: “the Scripture somewhere says…”
St. Athanasius, Defense Before Constantius, 17 - Tobit 4:18 - quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Defense Against the Arians, 11 - Tobit 12:7 - quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Festal Letter 3, 4 - Wis. 1:5 - quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Defense Before Constantius, 5 - Wis. 1:11 - quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Defense Against the Arians, 3 - Wis. 1:11 - may quote passage
St. Athanasius, History of the Arians, 71 - Wis. 2:21 - may allude to passage
St. Athanasius, On the Incarnation, 5 - Wis. 2:23 - quotes passage as by “Wisdom”
St. Athanasius, Defense of His Flight, 19 - Wis. 3:57 - quotes as from Wisdom
St. Athanasius, On the Incarnation, 4 - Wis. 6:18 - quotes passage as from Wisdom, but implies that it is not Scripture
St. Athanasius, Defense of Dionysius, 9 - Wis. 7:25 - quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Festal Letter, 1, 1 Wis. 7:27 - alludes to or quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Festal Letter, 10, 4 Wis. 7:27 - alludes to or quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Against the Heathen, 44 - Wis. 13:5 - quotes passage as though it is divinely inspired
St. Athanasius, Four Discourses Against the Arians, 32 - Wis. 13:5 - quotes passage
St. Athanasius, Against the Heathen, 9 - Wis. 14:12 - quotes passage with the introduction: “the wisdom of God testifies…”
St. Athanasius, Against the Heathen, 11 - Wis. 14:12-21 - quotes passage as from Scripture
St. Athanasius, Against the Heathen, 14 - Wis. 14:21 - Alludes to passage

St. Basil the Great (330-379)
St. Basil, Letter 6: To the Wife of Nektarius - 2 Macc. 7 - mentions passage
St. Basil, Letter 42: To Chilo - Bel. 39 - alludes to passage
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 6 - Bar. 3:3 - quotes as by Baruch
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 8 - Judith 9:5-6 - quotes passage
St. Basil, Letter 8: To the Caesareans - Sir. 11:3 - quotes as by Solomon
St. Basil, Letter 260: To Optimus - Sir. 20:18 - quotes passage
St. Basil, Hexameron, 6, 10 - Sir. 27:11 - quotes as part of Scripture
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 28 - Sir. 43:30 - quotes as from the book of Wisdom
St. Basil, Letter 8: To the Caesareans - Wis. 1:4 - alludes to passage
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 9 - Wis. 1:7 - alludes to passage
St. Basil, Letter 8: To the Caesareans - Wis. 1:7 - quotes passage
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 23 - Wis. 1:7 - alludes to or quotes passage
St. Basil, Letter 38: To Gregory - Wis. 7:26 - quotes but misattributes to St. Paul
St. Basil, On the Holy Spirit, 17 - Wis. 11:20 - alludes to passage
St. Basil, Letter 219: To the Clergy of Samosata - Wis. 11:20 - quotes passage

St. Cyril of Jerusalem (c. 313-386)
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 9, 2 - Song of the Three Children - quotes passage
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 14, 25  - Bel. 33 - alludes to passage
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 16, 31 - Sus. 45 - quotes passage
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 11, 15 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes passage as by a prophet
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 11, 19 - Sir. 3:22 - quotes passage
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 6, 4 - Sir. 3:21-22 - quotes passage
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 13, 8 - Sir. 4:31 - alludes to passage
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 16, 19 - Wis. 6:16 - quotes passage
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 9, 2 - Wis. 13:5 - quotes passage as by Solomon
St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 9, 16 - Wis. 13:5 - quotes passage

St. Gregory the Theologian (c. 329-390)
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 43, 74 - 2 Macc. 7 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 18, 30 - Bel. 33 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 2, 64 - Susanna - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 41, 14 - Susanna - mentions Susanna
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 30, 13 - Bar. 3:35-38 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Epistle 102: The Second Letter to Cledonius - Bar. 3:35-38
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 45, 15 - Judith 5:6 - quotes passage as from Scripture
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 32, 8 - Sir. 1:2 - possible allusion
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 41, 14 - Wis. 1:6 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 28, 8 - Wis. 1:7 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 21, 18 - Wis. 2:24 - possibly alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 7, 14 - Wis. 3:15 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 43, 23 - Wis. 4:8 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 42, 6 - Wis. 5:9-10 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 7, 19 - Wis. 5:9-10 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 29, 17 - Wis. 7:26 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 16, 15 - Wis. 9:15 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 2, 116 - Sir. 3:9 - quotes or alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 37, 18 - Sir. 3:10 - quotes or alludes to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 37, 6 - Sir. 3:11 - possible allusion to passage
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 2, 50 - Sir. 25:9 - doubtful allusion
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 27, 2 - Sir. 25:9 - doubtful allusion
St. Gregory the Theologian, Oration 7, 1 - Sir. 38:16 - doubtful allusion

St. Gregory of Nyssa (c. 335-395)
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On the Making of Man, 16, 14 - Sus. 42 - quotes with the introduction “as the prophetical writing says…”
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On the Making of Man, 22, 4 - Sus. 42 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On the Making of Man, 29, 1 - Sus. 42 - quotes passage
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 2, 1 - Bar. 3:35-38 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 5, 3 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes passage
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 6, 1 - Bar. 3:35-38 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 6, 4 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes passage as by a prophet
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On Virginity, 15 - Wis. 1:4 - quotes passage as from Scripture
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 8, 5 - Wis. 7:18 - quotes passage
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 2, 9 - Wis. 7:25 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 8, 4 - Wis. 7:25 - alludes to passage
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Against Eunomius, Book 5, 1 - Wis. 13 - possible allusion
St. Gregory of Nyssa, Answer to Eunomius’ Second Book - Wis. 13:5 - quotes passage three times, as from the Wisdom of Solomon
St. Gregory of Nyssa, On the Holy Spirit - Wis. 16:14 - quotes or alludes to passage
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« Reply #24 on: March 31, 2011, 02:45:17 AM »

St. Ambrose of Milan (c. 340-397)
St. Ambrose, On the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 16 - Tobit 2:4-7 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, On the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 16 - Tobit 7:11 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 5, 7 - Tobit 9:3 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Epistle 63, 16 - Tobit 12:8-9 - alludes to passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 14 - Judith - mentions Judith
St. Ambrose, Treatise Concerning Widows, 7 - Judith 8-10 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books Concerning Virginity, 2, 4 - Judith 10 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 13 - Judith 12:20 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Epistle 63: To Limeneus - Judith - mentions Judith
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 13 - Judith 15 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, On the Holy Spirit, 3, 11 - Wis. 1:4 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, On the Holy Spirit, 3, 17 - Wis. 1:4 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, On the Holy Spirit, 1, 7 - Wis. 1:7 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, On the Death of His Brother Satyrus, 2, 47 - Wis. 1:13 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Concerning Virgins, 1, 7 - Wis. 3:13 - quotes as by a prophet
St. Ambrose, On the Death of His Brother Satyrus, 1, 30 - Wis. 4:11 - quotes as from Scripture
St. Ambrose, On the Death of His Brother Satyrus, 2, 31 - Wis. 7:7, 17 - possible allusion to passage as by Solomon
St. Ambrose, On the Holy Spirit, 3, 18 - Wis. 7:22 - quotes as from the Scriptures
St. Ambrose, On the Holy Spirit, 3, 6 - Wis. 7:22-23 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 1, 7 - Wis. 7:26 - quotes as by a prophet
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 4, 11 - Wis. 7:27 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, On the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 13 - Wis. 7:29-30 - alludes to passage
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 4, 11 - Wis. 7:30 - quotes as by Solomon
St. Ambrose, Concerning Widows, 10 - Wis. 8:2 - quotes or alludes to passage
St. Ambrose, On the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 13 - Wis. 8:7 - quotes passage as from Scripture
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 3, 3 - Wis. 8:13 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Two Books Concerning Repentance, 1, 9 - Bar. 3:1-2 - quotes as though divinely inspired
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 2, 9 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Two Books Concerning Repentance, 1, 9 - Bar. 5:1 - quotes as though divinely inspired
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 14 - Sus. 23 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 3 - Sus. 35 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 18 - Sus. 35 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, On the Holy Spirit, 3, 6 - Sus. 44-46 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Concerning Virgins, 2, 4 - Sus. 44-46 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Treatise Concerning Widows, 4 - Sus. 63 - mentions Susannah
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 35 - Bel. 39 - alludes to passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 4 - Bel. 39 - alludes to passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 11 - Bel. 39 - alludes to passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 9 - Bel. 44 - alludes to passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 40 - 1 Macc. 2 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Letter 40:To Theodosius - 1 Macc. 2:7 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 40 - 1 Macc. 6:43 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 41 - 1 Macc. 9:8 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 41 - 1 Macc. 11:68 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 17 - 2 Macc. 1-2 - discussions passage at length
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 29 - 2 Macc. 3 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Letter 42: To Eugenius - 2 Macc. 4 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 41 - 2 Macc. 7 - mentions passage
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 5, 19 - Sir. 3:22 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 31 - Sir. 3:31 - alludes to passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 16 - Sir. 4:9 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 7 - Sir. 6:16 - mentions passage as from Ecclesiasticus
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 22 - Sir. 6:16 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books Concerning Virgins, 3, 3 - Sir. 9:5 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Epistle 63 - Sir. 18:30-31 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Epistle 63 - Sir. 19:2 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 2 - Sir. 20:7 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 3, 22 - Sir. 22:25-26 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 7 - Sir. 22:31 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 8 - Sir. 22:31 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 14 - Sir. 23:18 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 14 - Sir. 23:31 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 33 - Sir. 23:31 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Holy Spirit, 2, 5 - Sir. 24:3 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 1, 17 - Sir. 24:3 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 4, 8 - Sir. 24:5 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 1, 3 - Sir. 28:24-25 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Exposition of the Christian Faith, 1, 6 - Sir. 28:28 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 7 - Sir. 29:10 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Three Books on the Duties of the Clergy, 2, 14 - Sir. 31:9 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose, Two Books Concerning Repentance, 2, 5 - Sir. 47:23 - alludes to passage

Bl. Jerome (c. 347-420)
Bl. Jerome, Letter 7:To Chromatius, Jovinus, and Eusebius, 5 - 2 Macc. 7 - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 1:To Innocent, 9 - Song of the Three Children - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 79:To Salvina, 10 - Song of the Three Children - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 130:To Demetrias, 10 - Song of the Three Children - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 22:To Eustochium, 9 - Bel. 33-39 - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 3: To Rufinus, 1 - Bel. 33-36 - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 77:To Oceanus, 5 - Bar. 5:5 - quotes as by Baruch
Bl. Jerome, Letter 31:To Eustochium, 2 - Bar. 6 - quotes as by Baruch
Bl. Jerome, Letter 22:To Eustochium, 21 - Judith 13 - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 79:To Salvina, 10 - Judith 13 - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 54:To Furia, 16 - Judith 13 - mentions passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 118: To Julian, 4 - Sir. 2:1 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Against Jovinianus, 2, 3 - Sir. 2:1 - quotes pasage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 66: To Pammachius, 5 - Sir. 3:30 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 79: To Salvina, 4-5 - Sir. 3:30 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 108: To Eustochium, 16 - Sir. 3:30 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 66: To Pammachius, 6 - Sir. 4:25 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 127: To Principia, 6 - Sir. 7:36 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 133: To Ctesiphon, 2 - Sir. 10:9 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 77: To Oceanus, 6 - Sir. 11:25 - alludes to passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 71: To Lucinius, 3 - Sir. 13:1 - quotes as from Ecclesiasticus
Bl. Jerome, Letter 108: To Eustochium, 21 - Sir. 13:2 - quotes as from Scripture
Bl. Jerome, Preface to the Commentary on Ezekiel - Sir. 22:6 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 118: To Julian, 1 - Sir. 22:6 - quotes as from Scripture
Bl. Jerome, Letter 57: To Pammachius, 1 - Sir. 25:9 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Against Jovinianus, 2, 3 - Sir. 27:5 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 125: To Rusticus, 19 - Sir. 27:25 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 14: To Heliodorus, 6 - Wis. 1:11 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Against Jovinianus, 2, 31 - Wis. 1:11 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 51: From Epiphanius to John - Wis. 2:23 - quotes passage as by Solomon
Bl. Jerome, Letter 108: To Eustochium, 18 - Wis. 2:24 - alludes to passage
Bl. Jerome, Against the Pelagians, 1, 3 - Wis. 3:21 - quotes passage as from the Book of Wisdom
Bl. Jerome, Letter 58: To Paulinus, 1 - Wis. 4:9 - quotes as from Solomon
Bl. Jerome, Letter 60: To Heliodorus, 10 - Wis. 4:9 - alludes to passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 79: To Salvina, 6 - Wis. 4:9 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 39: To Paula, 3 - Wis. 4:11, 14 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 60: To Heliodorus, 2 - Wis. 4:11, 14 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 79:To Salvina, 2 - Wis. 4:11, 13-14 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 75: To Theodora, 2 - Wis. 4:11-14 - quotes as from the book of Wisdom
Bl. Jerome, Letter 54:To Furia, 2 - Wis. 4:13 - alludes to passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 23: To Marcella, 3 - Wis. 5:4 - possible allusion to passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 14: To Heliodorus, 9 - Wis. 6:6 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 64: To Pammachius, 3 - Wis. 8:7 - possible allusion
Bl. Jerome, Letter 108: To Eustochium, 23 - Wis. 9:15 - quotes passage
Bl. Jerome, Letter 144: From Augustine to Optatus, 5 - Wis. 10:1 - possible allusion
Bl. Jerome, Letter 122: To Rusticus, 1 - Wis. 10:7 - quotes passage
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« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2011, 03:55:23 AM »

Asteriktos
This is great. Thank you very much and God bless you.
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« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2011, 12:36:19 PM »

These are keepers. Thank you very much!
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« Reply #27 on: April 02, 2011, 11:36:32 PM »

It'd be nice if someday there was something like this based on a larger collection of works by the Church Fathers (e.g. Migne), but for now I'm stuck with the Philip Schaff collection.
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« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2012, 06:24:23 AM »

Sulpicius Severus (c. 363-425)
Sulpitius Severus, The Sacred History, 2, 14-16 - Judith - discusses story of Judith at length (cf The Sacred History, 2, 12)

St. John Cassian (360-435)
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, 5: Conference of Abbot Serapion, 12 - Bar. 3:11 - quotes as by a prophet
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, 7: Conference of Abbot Serenus, 5 - Bar. 3:11 - quotes as by a prophet
St. John Cassian, On the Incarnation of the Lord (Against Nestorius), 4, 9 - Bar. 3:35-38 - misattributes to Jeremiah
St. John Cassian, On the Incarnation of the Lord (Against Nestorius), 4, 13 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes as by a prophet
St. John Cassian, On the Incarnation of the Lord (Against Nestorius), 5, 5 - Bar. 3:35-38 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 7: The First Conference of Abbot Serenus, 25 - Sir. 2:5 - possible quotation
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 20: Conference of Abbot Pinufius, 8 - Sir. 3:33 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 6: The Conference of Abbot Theodore, 16 - Sir. 11:30 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 14: The First Conference of Abbot Nesteros, 16 - Sir. 15:9 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Institutes, Book 10: Of the Spirit of Accidie, 20 - Sir. 23:29 - possible allusion to passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 2: Second Conference of Abbot Moses, 13 - Sir. 25:5 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 6: The Conference of Abbot Theodore, 9 - Sir. 27:11 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 9: The First Conference of Abbot Isaac, 34 - Sir. 29:15 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 14: The First Conference of Abbot Nesteros, 16 - Sir. 32:20 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Institutes, Book 10: Of the Spirit of Accidie, 21 - Sir. 33:29 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 9: The First Conference of Abbot Isaac, 23 - Sir. 34:11 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 23:The Third Conference of Abbot Theonas, 3 - Sir. 39:16 - possible quotation
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 21: The First Conference of Abbot Theonas, 28 - Sir. 50:24 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 14:The First Conference of Abbot Nesteros, 2 - Wis. 1:4-5 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 14: The First Conference of Abbot Nesteros, 16 - Wis. 1:4-5 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 17: The Second Conference of Abbot Joseph, 15 - Wis. 1:11 - quotes as from a prophet
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 13:The Third Conference of Abbot Chæremon, 7 - Wis. 1:13 - quotes as from Scripture
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 18: Conference of Abbot Piamun, 16 - Wis. 2:24-25 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 2: Second Conference of Abbot Moses, 13 - Wis. 4:8-9 - quotes passage
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 8: The Second Conference of Abbot Serenus, 21 - Wis. 7:17-21 - quotes as through divine inspiration
St. John Cassian, The Conferences, Book 7: First Conference of Abbot Serenus, 4 - Wis. 9:15 - quotes as from the "so-called Wisdom of Solomon"

St. Vincent of Lerins (?-445)
St. Vincent of Lerins, The Commonitory, 38 - Sir. 2:1 - Quotes as from Scripture
St. Vincent of Lerins, The Commonitory, 21 - Sir. 8:14 - Quotes as by a divine Oracle
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« Reply #29 on: August 09, 2012, 03:06:34 AM »

Pope Leo the Great (400-461)
St. Leo the Great, Sermon 67, 4 - Sus. 56 - quotes passage
St. Leo the Great, Sermon 39, 3 - Sir. 2:1 - quotes passage as by Solomon
St. Leo the Great, Sermon 10, 4 - Sir. 3:30 - quotes passage
St. Leo the Great, Sermon 49, 2 - Sir. 13:1 - quotes passage
St. Leo the Great, Sermon 10 - Tobit 4:7 - quotes passage
St. Leo the Great, Sermon 77, 2 - Wis. 2:24 - quotes passage
St. Leo the Great, Sermon 49, 3 - Wis. 2:24 - alludes to passage

Pope Gregory the Great (c. 540-604)
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 28: To Theodore - Sir. 3:33 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 18: To John - Sir. 6:6 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 30 - Sir. 7:14 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 17 - Sir. 10:9 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 18: To John - Sir. 10:9 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 17 - Sir. 10:13 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 1, 3 - Sir. 11:10 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 20 - Sir. 12:4 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 33 - Sir. 19:1 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 25 - Sir. 20:32 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 7: To Peter, Domitian, and Elpidius - Sir. 27:12 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 31: To Theodorus - Sir. 29:15 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 28: To Theodore - Sir. 29:15 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 2, 6 - Sir. 32:1 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 25 - Sir. 32:10 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 18: To John - Sir. 32:10 - quotes passage as by Solomon
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 15 - Sir. 32:24 - quotes as by Solomon
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 21 - Sir. 34:20 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 30 - Sir. 34:30 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 28 - Tobit 4:9 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, The Book of Pastoral Rule, 20 - Tobit 4:17 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 11 - Wis. 1:5 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 53: To John - Wis. 1:11 - quotes passage as from Scripture
St. Gregory the Great, Book of the Pastoral Rule, 3, 10 - Wis. 2:24 - quotes passage
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 7: To Peter, Domitian, and Elpidius - Wis. 3:7 - possible quotation
St. Gregory the Great, Epistle 7: To Peter, Domitian, and Elpidius - Wis. 9:15 - quotes passage

John of Damascus (676-749)
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 1, 13 - Bar. 3:35-38 - possible allusion
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 2, 28 - Wis. 1:13 - possible allusion
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 4, 4 - Wis. 2:23 - possible allusion
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 3, 1 - Wis. 2:24 - quotes passage
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 4, 15 - Wis. 3:1 - quotes as from divine Scripture
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 4, 27 - Wis. 3:1 - quotes passage
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 1, 13 - Wis. 12:5 - quotes passage
St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 1, 1 - Wis. 13:5 - quotes passage
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« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2012, 03:58:12 AM »

Except for Sts. John Chrysostom and Augustine I've completed the Church Fathers from the ANF and NPNF collection. Those two will take quite a while to get through, but I thought I'd post some preliminary observations on the Fathers I've posted so far. The potential problems here are many: incomplete data, working with translations and not the original languages, my own ability to muck things up, etc. So if I say something that seems off please let me know!  Anyway, I'm going to divide this into two parts, one dealing with issue that muddies the waters, and the second with usage of the deuterocanonicals.

Muddying of the Waters
Some problems we have is that we find that sometimes a writer calls something "scripture" or attributes divine inspiration to it, or attributes it to a canonical author, when they don't necessarily mean to imply that a book is canonical. And sometimes there is just overall confusion as to what an author believed.

I'll start with Origen, who, although condemned, was nonetheless important in telling us in various places what the early Church was doing and saying. Eusebius [1] says that Origen rejected nearly all the deuterocanonicals, except perhaps 1 and 2 Maccabees. The actual writings of Origen (that I've used) doesn't make this at all clear, however. In On First Principles Origen seems to side with those who consider Wisdom of Solomon "a work which is certainly not esteemed authoritative by all." [2] And in another place [3] Origen mentions that Tobit is not used by the Jews, nor in the Jewish canon, though he does say that "the Churches use" the book. Elsewhere Origen sometimes confuses who he is quoting, such as when he attributes a passage from Sirach to the Wisdom of Solomon [4], or in another place when he quotes a passage from Sirach from memory, introducing it with the words: "one of our own wise men says somewhere" [5] Nonetheless, Origen refers to Wisdom of Solomon as Scripture [6] and the "word of God" [7]. He also calls 2 Maccabees "Holy Scripture" [8], in addition to Sirach also being called "holy Scripture" [9] and "the divine word." [10]

We also find such problems in the Church Fathers. St. Irenaeus quotes the additions to Daniel as though written by Daniel [11], and (making a common mistake) refers to Baruch as though written by Jeremiah. [12] St. Athanasius begins a quote from Sirach with the words "as the Holy Scripture somewhere says," [13] even though St. Athanasius clearly excluded Sirach from his canon. [14]  St. John of Damascus beings a quote from Wisdom of Solomon with the words "the divine Scripture likewise says," [15] despite excluding that book from his biblical canon just two chapters later. [16] And in the west we find St. Hilary of Poitiers falling into the same problem, [17] as well as even St. Jerome. [18]

There was also, of course, the problem of not everyone agreeing on what books were canonical to begin with. Eusebius, for example, says that "the so-called epistle of James" is "among the disputed writings, which are nevertheless recognized by many," [19] and that James, the bishop of Jerusalem, "is said to be the author of the first of the so-called catholic epistles. But it is to be observed that it is disputed; at least, not many of the ancients have mentioned it... Nevertheless we know that [James] also, with the rest, have been read publicly in very many churches." [20] Elsewhere Eusebius unhesitatingly calls the Epistle of James "scripture" and says that it was written by "the holy apostle". [21]

Going further into the fourth century we find the Council of Laodicea (c. 364) accepting Baruch but no other Deuterocanonical books. [22] Writing three years later St. Athanasius says that Baruch is canonical, that Esther is not, and that some of the other books may be read for edification. [23] St. Cyril of Jerusalem accepts only Baruch [24] and St. Gregory the Theologian [25] and St. Amphilocius of Iconium [26] accept none of the deuterocanonical books. The Apostolic Canons accepts 1-3 Maccabees and says that Sirach may be read. [27] The Council of Hippo of 393 [28] and the 3rd Council of Carthage of 397 [29]  both accept the seven deuterocanonical books currently in the Roman Catholic canon.

And I could go on, but the point is that there were disagreements. This gets an exclamation point at the Council of Trullo in c. 690--reckoned of Ecumenical authority by Orthodox Christians--which accepts multiple scriptural canons. [30] None of this is meant to make people unsure of their faith. It is exactly faith which we need, not reliance on perfection, which humans can never give us. Certainly we should look to expressions of individual Fathers for edification and enlightnement, but none of them individually are infallible.

Usage of the Deuterocanonicals in the Early Fathers
St. Clement of Rome mentioned Judish, [31] but past that we have nothing certain, though he perhaps quotes or alludes to Wisdom of Solomon and/or Sirach [32], but these are long shots. Other possible quotations or allusions can be found in St. Ignatius, [33] St. Polycarp [34], and Tatian. [35] In the Epistle of Barnabas we find a quote from Sirach, [36] and another from Wisdom of Solomon (mistakenly attribted to Isaiah). [37] In the Didache we find a quote of Sirach. [38]

Toward the end of the 2nd and into the 3rd centuries we still have a bit of a mixed bag, with St. Melito of Sardis rejecting almost all the deuterocanonical books, [39] but with St. Irenaeus using the books a bit more than earlier authors, quoting or alluding to Baruch [40], additions in Daniel [41] and Wisdom of Solomon. [42] Tertullian quotes Baruch, [43] Bel and the Dragon, [44] Judith, [45] and perhaps mentioned Tobit, [46] though he could be referring to other Scriptures with this latter example. He also quotes Wisdom of Solomon several times, and attributes the work to Solomon [47] Pope Callixtus quotes Tobit as "sacred Scripture." [48]  As for Sirach, St. Clement quotes it four dozen times in just the Stromata and The Instructor, calling it Scripture many times [53]. He quotes Wisdom of Solomon nearly two dozen times, calling it scripture once [54], preferring instead preferring to introduce the passages as from Solomon or "the divine Wisdom". [55] Origen also quotes from the deuterocanonicals often, despite the muddy waters mentioned above, as can be seen in this post.

St. Cyprian of Carthage also quoted frequently from the deuterocanonical books. Tobit is quoted quite frequently, being referred to as "Holy Scripture" [56] and from the Lord, [57] and St. Cyprian also accepts the words attributed to the Archangel Raphael as authentic. [58] St. Cyprian also considers the books of the Macabees to be "Holy Scripture" [59] and quotes them multiple times, in addition to also quoting Bel and the Dragon, Susanna, and the Song of the Three Children. [60] In one place he introduces the story of Bel and the Dragon with the word: "Daniel, devoted to God, and filled with the Holy Spirit, exclaims and says…" [61]; likewise concerning Baruch, he introduces a quotation with the words: "The Holy Spirit, moreover, suggests these same things by Jeremiah, and teaches, saying..." [62] St. Cyprian seemed to think that Solomon wrote Sirach [63] and considers is a book inspired by the Holy Spirit [64] and "sacred scripture." [65] Regarding Wisdom of Solomon, St. Cyprian prefers to introduce his dozens of quotations from this book as being by Solomon, saying things like: "the Holy Spirit teaches by Solomon," [66] and "The Holy Spirit shows and predicts by Solomon, saying…" [67]; However, he does say in an epistle that it is "sacred scripture." [68]

The deuterocanonicals were not neglected by other ecclesiastical writers, being quoted for example by St. Dionysius of Alexandria several times, [69] who also introduces one passage from Sirach with the words: "listen to the divine oracles" [70]. Other third century authors to quote or allude to the books in question include Achelaus [71] and St. Victorinus [72]. Early in the fourth century we find quotes from the deuterocanonicals in St. Peter of Alexandria, [73] St. Alexander of Alexandria, [74] Lactantius, [75] and St. Methodius. [76]

Footnotes
[1] Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History, 6.25
[2] Origen, On First Principles, 4.33
[3] Origen, Letter To Africanus, 13
[4] Origen, Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew, 13.4
[5] Origen, Against Celcus, 4.75
[6] Origen, On First Principles, 2.9; 3.1
[7] Origen, Against Celcus, 3.72
[8] Origen, On First Principles, 2.1
[9] Origen, On First Principles, 2.8; Against Celcus, 6.7
[10] Origen, Against Celcus, 8.50
[11] St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 4.5.2 and 4.26.3
[12] St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies 5.35.1; Demonstration of the Apostolic Preaching, 97
[13] St. Athanasius, Defense Against the Arians, 5
[14] St. Athanasius, Epistle 39 (from 367)
[15] St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 4.15
[16] St. John of Damascus, An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, 4.17
[17] St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 1.7; 4.16; 4.42; 5.39
[18] St. Jerome, Letter 118: To Julian, 1; Letter 108: To Eustochium, 21
[19] Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History, 3.25
[20] Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History, 2.23
[21] Eusebius, Commentary in the Psalms, 56.2; 100.5
[22] Council of Laodicea, Canons 59-60
[23] St. Athanasius, Letter 39
[24] St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures, 4
[25] St. Gregory the Theologian, Metre Poems
[26] St. Amphilocius of Iconium, Iambics
[27] Apostolic Canons, 85
[28] Council of Hippo of 393, Canon 36
[29] Council of Carthage of 397, Canon 24
[30] Council of Trullo, Canon 2
[31] St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 55
[32] St. Clement of Rome, Epistle to the Corinthians, 3 (cf Wis 2:24); 27 (cf Wis. 12:12); 34 (cf Sir. 4:29)
[33] St. Ignatius of Antioch, Epistle to the Magnesians, 3 (cf Susanna 52)
[34] St. Polycarp, Epistle to the Philippians, 10 (cf Tob. 4:10 and/or 12:9)
[35] Tatian, Address to the Greeks, 7 (cf Wis. 2:23)
[36] Epistle of Barnabas, 19 (cf Sir. 4:31)
[37] Epistle of Barnabas, 6 (cf Wis. 2:12)
[38] Didache, 4 (cf Sir. 4:31)
[39] According to Eusebius in Ecclestiastical History, 4.26
[40] St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 5.35.1 (cf Bar. 4:36-5:9); Against Heresies, 4.20.4 (cf Baruch 3:38); Demonstration of the Apostolic Preaching, 97 (cf Bar. 3:29-4:1)
[41] St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 4.5.2 (cf Dan. 12:4-5)
[42] St. Irenaeus, Against Heresies, 2.28.9 (cf Wis. 9:17); Against Heresies, 4.38.3 (cf Wis. 6:19)
[43] Tertullian, Antidote for the Scorpion’s Sting
[44] Tertullian, On Fasting, 7
[45] Tertullian, On Monogamy, 17
[46] Tertullian, On Prayer, 16 (cf Tob. 12:12)
[47] Tertullian, Against the Valentinians, 2; Against Marcion, 3, 22; Prescription Against the Heretics, 7
[48] Pope Callixtus I, Epistles, 2, 5 (cf Tob. 4:15)
[49] St. Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 1.21
[50] St. Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2.7; cf Stromata 4.19
[51] St. Clement of Alexandria, Stromata, 2.23; 6.12
[52] St. Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 2.3
[53] St. Clement of Alexandria, The Instructor, 1.8; 2.5; 2.8; 3.3; 3.4; 3.11; etc.
[54] St. Clement of Alexandria, Stromata 5.14
[55] St. Clement of Alexandria, Stromata 4.16; 6.11; 6.14; 6.15; etc.
[56] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Treatise 4.32
[57] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Epistle 51.22
[58] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Treatise 4.33; 7.10; 8.5
[59] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Epistle 54.3
[60] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Epistle 55.5; Treatise 12.3.20
[61] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Treatise 11.11
[62] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Treatise 4.5
[63] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Epistle 54.21; Treatise 12.3.53; 12.3.95; 12.3.113
[64] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Epistle 64.2
[65] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Treatise 8.2
[66] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Treatise 7.23
[67] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Treatise 11. 12
[68] St. Cyprian of Carthage, Epistle 80.2
[69] St. Dionysius of Alexandria, Books on Nature, 5; Epistle to Bishop Dionysius of Rome, 4; Epistle 10: Against Bishop Germanus, 4
[70] St. Dionysius of Alexandria, Books on Nature, 3
[71] Achelaus, The Acts of the Disputation With the Heresiarch Manes, 29
[72] St. Victorinus, On the Creation of the World
[73] St. Peter of Alexandria, Fragments, 5
[74] St. Alexander of Alexandria, Epistles on the Arian Heresy, 1, 5
[75] Lancantius, The Divine Institutes, 4.8; 4.13; 4.16
[76] St. Methodius, Concerning Chastity, Theophila, 3; Concerning Chastity, Marcella, 3
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« Reply #31 on: December 28, 2012, 12:41:06 AM »

I know, I know, TL;DR, right?  Cheesy
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« Reply #32 on: December 28, 2012, 07:09:04 AM »

Wut am I reading?
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« Reply #33 on: December 28, 2012, 07:30:16 AM »

Wut am I reading?

A list of references of the times that the early Church Fathers quoted or alluded to the deuterocanonical books. So, for example, this:

Quote
St. Hilary of Poitiers, On the Trinity, 1, 7 - Wis. 13:5 - quotes passage as by a prophet

... means that St. Hilary directly quoted Wis. 13:5 and speaks of the verse as being by a "prophet".

Early in the thread the approach was to list quotes according to deuterocanonical book. So, for example, if you wanted to know about who quoted Wis. 3 you could look that up. The later part of the thread is a list of where and what specific Church Fathers quoted. Neither list is complete, due to my having to work solely in English, but it's a start.
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« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2012, 07:14:41 AM »

Would they quote them as authoritatively as they might other books? Those quotes that specifically imply these are definietly scripture would be of teh most use, when discussing with protestants primarily.
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« Reply #35 on: January 08, 2013, 11:33:39 PM »

Would they quote them as authoritatively as they might other books? Those quotes that specifically imply these are definietly scripture would be of teh most use, when discussing with protestants primarily.

Sometimes they did, and sometimes they didn't. Also, sometimes they quotes something from memory and called it Scripture even though they technically excluded it from their Bible canon.
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« Reply #36 on: November 21, 2013, 01:50:39 AM »

I'm going to start looking at the rest of the Fathers/references available (to me), though they will come in smaller chunks than what was in the above posts...

St. Irenaeus (c. 125-202)
St. Irenaeus, The Demonstration of the Apostolic Preaching, 16 - Wis. 2:24 - possible allusion
St. Irenaeus, The Demonstration of the Apostolic Preaching, 62 - Wis. 9:15 - possible reference
St. Irenaeus, The Demonstration of the Apostolic Preaching, 97 - Bar. 3:29-4:1 - a lengthy reference, said to be by Jeremiah

Origen (c. 185-254)
Origen, The Philocalia, 22.8 - Wis. 1:4 - quotes passage
Origen, The Philocalia, 21.13 - Wis. 7:16 - quotes passage
Origen, The Philocalia, 22.7 - Wis. 10:5 - quotes passage as from "the book entitled 'The Wisdom of Solomon'"
Origen, The Philocalia, 1.29 - Wis. 17:1 - quotes passage
Origen, The Philocalia, 20.11 - Sir. 16:27 - possible allusion
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« Reply #37 on: November 21, 2013, 08:20:15 PM »

St. Ambrose of Milan (340-397)
St. Ambrose of Milan, Letter 16.5 - Wis. 4:9 - alludes to passage
St. Ambrose of Milan, Letter 18.7 - Wis. 4:9 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose of Milan, Letter 29.17 - Wis. 9:15 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose of Milan, Letter 2.18 - Sir. 19:23-24 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose of Milan, Letter 15.11 - Sir. 44:15 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose of Milan, Letter 15.4 - Bar. 3:24-25 - quotes passage
St. Ambrose of Milan, Letter 19.5 - Tob. 4:21 - mentions as coming from Tobit
St. Ambrose of Milan, Letter 57.9 - 2 Macc. 4:18 - quotes passage
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« Reply #38 on: November 22, 2013, 11:35:36 PM »

Asterius of Amasea (c. 350-410)
Asterius of Amasea, Sermon 3: Against Covetousness - Bel and the Dragon - mentions part of it in passing

St. John Chrysostom (c. 347-407)
St. John Chrysostom, On The Parable of The Rich Man And Lazarus, 2.4 - Sir. 4:1 - possible reference of passage
St. John Chrysostom, On The Parable of The Rich Man And Lazarus, 2.6 - Sir. 4:3 - quotes passage
St. John Chrysostom, On The Parable of The Rich Man And Lazarus, 2.3 - Sir. 7:36 - quotes passage
St. John Chrysostom, On The Parable of The Rich Man And Lazarus, 3.1 - Sir. 9:13 - quotes passage as if from Scripture

St. Jerome (347-420)
St. Jerome, Commentary on Daniel, 11 - 1 Macc. - mentions activities found in the work
St. Jerome, Commentary on Daniel, 12 - 1 Macc. - mentions activities found in the work
St. Jerome, Commentary on Daniel, 8 - Tobit - mentions activities found in the work
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« Reply #39 on: November 24, 2013, 12:22:17 PM »

St. Augustine (354-430)
St. Augustine, Enchiridion: On Faith, Hope, and Love, 19 - Sir. 15:20 - quotes or paraphrases passage
St. Augustine, Enchiridion: On Faith, Hope, and Love, 18 - Sir. 27:5 - quotes passage
St. Augustine, Enchiridion: On Faith, Hope, and Love, 20 - Sir. 30:24 - apparently quotes passage(?)
St. Augustine, Enchiridion: On Faith, Hope, and Love, 17 - Sir. 40:1 - quotes as from Scripture
St. Augustine, Enchiridion: On Faith, Hope, and Love, 1 - Wis. 6:24 - quotes passage
St. Augustine, Enchiridion: On Faith, Hope, and Love, 9 - Wis. 11:20 - quotes passage
St. Augustine, Enchiridion: On Faith, Hope, and Love, 31 - Wis. 11:20 - quotes passage
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« Reply #40 on: December 26, 2013, 05:41:20 PM »

Would they quote them as authoritatively as they might other books? Those quotes that specifically imply these are definietly scripture would be of teh most use, when discussing with protestants primarily.

Sometimes they did, and sometimes they didn't. Also, sometimes they quotes something from memory and called it Scripture even though they technically excluded it from their Bible canon.

What do you think about this Catholic article? http://matt1618.freeyellow.com/deut.html  It shows that although the Fathers generally excluded most of the deuterocanonicals from their canon, they still considered them as Scripture and used them to prove doctrine. Except for St. Jerome that is, who seems to be either inconsistent when he calls the deuterocanonicals Scripture and yet when he lists the canon he excludes the deuterocanonicals and says we can't use them to prove doctrine, or we are just misunderstanding him.
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« Reply #41 on: December 26, 2013, 10:48:22 PM »

While I mentioned some tentative thoughts above, for example...

Some problems we have is that we find that sometimes a writer calls something "scripture" or attributes divine inspiration to it, or attributes it to a canonical author, when they don't necessarily mean to imply that a book is canonical. And sometimes there is just overall confusion as to what an author believed.

I have come to wonder how much of this is my own confusion and/or that of others. I have not read the article you linked to though, so I am not meaning to speak of that in particular. But in general... the very concept of a canon as many of us conceive it seems to not necessarily match what writers in, say, the 5th century believed, let alone the 2nd or 1st centuries. It's a rule, or guide, or whatever term you want to use, but it'd not a set-in-stone thing necessarily. I think there was confusion on the part of the authors at times. I know there was, actually, as they attributed passages to wrong authors, combined texts without realizing it, and so forth (and understandably so, given what they were working with.)  But maybe it goes well beyond that, and it simply wasn't that important, in that canon was not necessarily tied at the hip with authority. With the trinity, or Christology, or some other things, these were important enough to argue over and wage war over (spiritually or otherwise) and be exact and rigid and such. Yet with the Bible, which would seem to be very important, while people sometimes spoke in fairly certain-sounding ways, they had to realize that others in the Church disagreed, in both theory and in actual practice, and didn't usually make a big stink about that. But as I said, I haven't had a chance to read what you mention yet; maybe this weekend...
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« Reply #42 on: January 23, 2014, 12:06:37 AM »

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« Reply #43 on: February 11, 2014, 12:30:44 AM »

What do you think about this Catholic article?

I would still like to give this article another shot... but that formatting and coloring...
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« Reply #44 on: February 21, 2014, 03:33:20 AM »

Palladius of Galatia (364-425)
Palladius of Galatia, The Lausiac History, Prologue - Sir. 8:9 - quotes passage
Palladius of Galatia, The Lausiac History, Prologue - Sir. 19:30 - quotes passage, adding "as Wisdom says"
Palladius of Galatia, The Lausiac History, 38.1 - Wis. 4:13 - quotes passage as from Scripture
Palladius of Galatia, Life of St. John Chrysostom, 12 - Sir. 8:9 - quotes passage
Palladius of Galatia, Life of St. John Chrysostom, 12 - Sir. 11:29 - quotes passage
Palladius of Galatia, Life of St. John Chrysostom, 17 - Sir. 21:15 - paraphrases passage
Palladius of Galatia, Life of St. John Chrysostom, 20 - Sir. 2:14 - quotes passage as from "the word"
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