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Author Topic: Where do Western Rite parishes get their leavened hosts?  (Read 3370 times) Average Rating: 0
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samkim
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« on: November 16, 2009, 01:50:36 PM »

Where do Western Rite parishes get their leavened hosts? Do they make them?
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« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2009, 01:58:27 PM »

Some make their own but I think there is someplace in Tennessee that makes them.
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Joseph
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2009, 01:58:56 PM »

Do any use unleavened hosts?
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« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2009, 04:49:06 PM »

Do any use unleavened hosts?
NO!
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Joseph
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« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2009, 04:58:52 PM »


They *shouldn't*, but I've heard of some that buy them from RC places.
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samkim
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« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2009, 09:10:38 PM »


LOL... I will never understand why this is a big deal.
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« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2009, 10:54:55 PM »

Where do Western Rite parishes get their leavened hosts? Do they make them?

EO's don't use the terminology "host" do they?
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samkim
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« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2009, 11:48:57 PM »

Where do Western Rite parishes get their leavened hosts? Do they make them?

EO's don't use the terminology "host" do they?

Sometimes. Near certain Western Rite-ers do.
« Last Edit: November 16, 2009, 11:49:45 PM by samkim » Logged

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ytterbiumanalyst
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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2009, 09:22:06 PM »

Where do Western Rite parishes get their leavened hosts? Do they make them?

EO's don't use the terminology "host" do they?
Not usually. Most of us call it either "prosphora" or, when referring to the Blood and Body, simply "Jesus."
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« Reply #9 on: December 01, 2009, 01:43:50 PM »

Where do Western Rite parishes get their leavened hosts? Do they make them?

EO's don't use the terminology "host" do they?
Not usually. Most of us call it either "prosphora" or, when referring to the Blood and Body, simply "Jesus."

Forgive me for intruding, but...

[pedantic]

Prosphora is what we call the bread that we give to the priest to serve the Liturgy with.  What he cuts out to consecrate into the Body is called the Host.  What is left over from the Prosphora becomes sepifka if you've taken communion, and antidoron if you've abstained.

[/pedantic]

Western Rite may not have the practice of cutting out the host - I'm not sure about that one.

So, yes, we do use the term host.  You'll find reference to the term in the rubrics of the Proskemedia service.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 01:46:06 PM by Monk Cyprian » Logged

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« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2009, 02:09:38 PM »

Don't have an Ieratikon or a Liturgikon with me, but I certainly don't recall any official liturgical book using the word "host." All rubrics I have seen usually call it the "Lamb" (amnos), or sometimes the "Holy Gifts," the "Holy Bread" or even less frequently just the "Bread" (artos).

These are all words that appear many times in the Proskomidi and in the rubrics of both the anaphora and the communion of the clergy (since it is necessary to distinguish between the two species -- and even necessary to distinguish the Lamb from the various other particles -- at that point). Once the Chalice is prepared for the laity, the rubrics just call it "Communion" and the priest, when he administers it, calls it the "Body and Blood of our Lord and God and Saviour, Jesus Christ."

Outside of liturgical books, I personally have never heard an Orthodox layperson or theologian call it the "host"... sounds very Anglo-Catholic to my ears, really, but I suppose it's a fine English word. It's not nearly as accurate as saying the "Lamb," though, since that's the specific part of the bread on the discos that is actually fractured, that a new ordinand is charged to guard, etc.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2009, 02:35:47 PM by pensateomnia » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2009, 03:02:59 PM »

You know, I may have just made a big fool of myself.  Smiley  I was just going off the top of my head from what was explained to me (many years ago now) when I converted to Orthodoxy.  The priest who chrismated me had an Anglican background, so that may account for it.  It never occured to me that it might make a difference in the terminology he used.

I googled "prosphora+host" and didn't get too many hits, however, "prosphora+lamb" has a much bigger response.  So it seems that, almost rarely, Orthodox will refer to it as a "host", but "lamb" is by far the more common term.

I was wrong.  Please forgive me.
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Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)
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« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2009, 04:43:10 PM »

You know, I may have just made a big fool of myself.  Smiley  I was just going off the top of my head from what was explained to me (many years ago now) when I converted to Orthodoxy.  The priest who chrismated me had an Anglican background, so that may account for it.  It never occured to me that it might make a difference in the terminology he used.

I googled "prosphora+host" and didn't get too many hits, however, "prosphora+lamb" has a much bigger response.  So it seems that, almost rarely, Orthodox will refer to it as a "host", but "lamb" is by far the more common term.

I was wrong.  Please forgive me.

Nobody is perfect (all of the time)!   Cheesy
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