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bkovacs
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« on: September 28, 2009, 02:43:36 AM »

How many do you all have and which ones?. I have the Jordanville, but thinking of getting another to compliment it. Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2009, 04:36:00 AM »

The little red Antiochian one is popular (there's one for the WRO too).

There's also an abbreviated Horologion done by an Athonite and put out in English by Holy Myrrhbearers Monastery "A Manual of the Hours of the Orthodox Church" that's nice.
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« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2009, 09:53:10 PM »

How many do you all have and which ones?. I have the Jordanville, but thinking of getting another to compliment it. Smiley
 
You need an old Chlib Dusi.  One that is worn all around the edges. Its pages opened so frequently that it never completely closes anymore.  Then you need to get a bunch of old, faded, small paper icons and put them inside but don’t put them securely inside. You want them to fall out everywhere.  Before DL, take out your little icons in the nave and reverence them (all 30 of them).   During coffee hour, put your bifocals inside it and leave it someplace where you cannot remember (your purse/coat pocket is always a good place to lose it).   When your tea is finished, ask everyone to help you look for your it. When it is located, exclaim how amazing it was that it was inside your purse/coat pocket because you never put it there.

Memory Eternal to our grandmothers. Smiley
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Andrew21091
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« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2009, 10:49:32 PM »

I have the Jordanville prayer book in English and Slavonic, the Old Orthodox Prayer Book, the Old Rite Horologion, and the Agpeya (Coptic prayer book). Out of all of them, the Old Orthodox prayer book gets used the most. I love how the prayers are set up and it also contains the Hours (but not Compline) and a variety of canons which is really nice. It also shows where bows and prostrations are to be made during prayer also so it really gives you the feel of really traditional Orthodox worship in it's purest form. I have always spoken very highly of the Old Orthodox prayer book since in my opinion it's the best one out there. 
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bkovacs
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« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2009, 11:48:16 PM »

I have the Jordanville prayer book in English and Slavonic, the Old Orthodox Prayer Book, the Old Rite Horologion, and the Agpeya (Coptic prayer book). Out of all of them, the Old Orthodox prayer book gets used the most. I love how the prayers are set up and it also contains the Hours (but not Compline) and a variety of canons which is really nice. It also shows where bows and prostrations are to be made during prayer also so it really gives you the feel of really traditional Orthodox worship in it's purest form. I have always spoken very highly of the Old Orthodox prayer book since in my opinion it's the best one out there. 

Do you use your Agbeya. This also looks like a good little prayerbook.
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« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2009, 01:16:44 AM »

I have the UOC, OCA, Jordanville, GOA, and Antiochian prayer books. (Hey, when you ride the jurisdictional carousel, you have to be prepared!)

The UOC and Jordanville prayer books are my favorite. I also feel a certain connection with the UOC prayer book, since my Godmother grew up with the same edition.  Smiley

(Ms. Hoorah, hers is also filled with the icon cards btw.)
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« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2009, 04:17:30 PM »

How many do you all have and which ones?. I have the Jordanville, but thinking of getting another to compliment it. Smiley

All the ones I have are in electronic format, which are:

1. The old Jordanville Prayer Book (Lazaras Moore), can be viewed here or here.
2. The Antiochian Orthodox, a.k.a. the "Little Red Book", can be viewed here.
3. Transfiguration Prayer Book by Fr. Peter Gregory (not the one by HTM), looks like the Antiochian one in modern English, can be viewed here.
4. Daily Prayers For Orthodox Christians Fr. N. Michael Vaporis, can be viewed here.
5. My Orthodox Prayer Book by the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese Department of Religious Education download pdf.
6. My Prayer Book by the Attendants of Hieromonk Spyridon, New Skete, Mount Athos, Greece, download pdf.
7. And lastly the Daily Prayer Book by the Youth Department of the OCA, download pdf.

So those are the "freebies" and I think it's a good idea to see samples before buying a hard copy, but this is not always an option.

Here's a list of the other prayer books I know of (but haven't seen) based on the lists from OrthodoxWiki & Orthodox Prayer:

1. The new Jordanville Prayer Book (Lawrence Campbell) by Holy Trinity Monastery, Jordanville. I assume this is the one most of you have, this page has samples of it.
2. A Prayer Book for Orthodox Christians by Holy Transfiguration Monastery.
3. An Orthodox Prayer Book by Archimandrite Ephrem. I'm particularly interested in this one anyone seen it?
4. The Old Orthodox Prayer Book, a.k.a. "The Old Believer Prayer Book".
5. Orthodox Daily Prayers by St. Tikhon's Seminary Press.
6. A Prayer Book: An Anthology of Orthodox Prayers by Fr. Peter A. Chamberas, published by Alexander Press.
7. Orthodox Prayer Book by Holy Protection Monastery.
8. Orthodox Christian Prayerbook by the Orthodox Christian Prison Ministry, this one looks very nice.
9. Orthodox Prayers for Everyday by Maureen Girard, published by Regina Orthodox Press.
10. A Manual of Eastern Orthodox Prayers by St. Vladmir's Seminary Press.
11. Come To Me by Christ the Saviour Seminary Press.
12. Prayer Book in Accordance with the Tradition of the Eastern Orthodox Church by All Saints of Alaska Orthodox Church. This one looks very good, see pdf sample.
13. My Daily Orthodox Prayer Book by by Anthony Coniaris, published by Light and Life Publishing.

And finally these two interesting and Orthodox friendly Melkite Catholic Prayer Books:

14. Publicans Prayer Book by Sophia Press. The Melkite equivalent to the Jordanville Prayer Book, with two crucial differences:

1) it's in modern English not "KJVish English"
2) instead of the Divine Liturgy it contains the complete Menaion

Review: http://byzantineramblings.blogspot.com/2009/05/of-prayer-books-ii.html

And:

15. A Book for Prayer by the Melkite Eparchy of Newton, MA. The Melkite equivalent of the "Little Red Book" but in modern English.

Review: http://byzantineramblings.blogspot.com/2009/05/of-prayer-books-v-book-for-prayer.html

As for which prayer book would make the best compliment for the Jordanville Prayer Book, since the Jordanville Prayer Book is quite comprehensive I think a similar prayer book like the HTM, All Saints of Alaska or Publicans Prayer Book would make the best compliment.



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« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2009, 06:24:49 PM »

I also feel a certain connection with the UOC prayer book, since my Godmother grew up with the same edition.

Purchase link?
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« Reply #8 on: September 29, 2009, 06:40:31 PM »

There's also an abbreviated Horologion done by an Athonite and put out in English by Holy Myrrhbearers Monastery "A Manual of the Hours of the Orthodox Church" that's nice.

Is this going to be more helpful than the Hours included in the Old Orthodox Prayer Book?  How is it different, assuming you are familiar with the Old Rite book?
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« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2009, 11:39:14 PM »

I have the Jordanville prayer book in English and Slavonic, the Old Orthodox Prayer Book, the Old Rite Horologion, and the Agpeya (Coptic prayer book). Out of all of them, the Old Orthodox prayer book gets used the most. I love how the prayers are set up and it also contains the Hours (but not Compline) and a variety of canons which is really nice. It also shows where bows and prostrations are to be made during prayer also so it really gives you the feel of really traditional Orthodox worship in it's purest form. I have always spoken very highly of the Old Orthodox prayer book since in my opinion it's the best one out there. 

Do you use your Agbeya. This also looks like a good little prayerbook.

Yeah, I use it every once in a while and I love it.


Here is a good translation online: http://www.copticchurch.org/agpeya
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« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2009, 08:26:03 AM »

I have the Jordanville prayer book in English and Slavonic, the Old Orthodox Prayer Book, the Old Rite Horologion, and the Agpeya (Coptic prayer book). Out of all of them, the Old Orthodox prayer book gets used the most. I love how the prayers are set up and it also contains the Hours (but not Compline) and a variety of canons which is really nice. It also shows where bows and prostrations are to be made during prayer also so it really gives you the feel of really traditional Orthodox worship in it's purest form. I have always spoken very highly of the Old Orthodox prayer book since in my opinion it's the best one out there. 

Do you use your Agbeya. This also looks like a good little prayerbook.

Yeah, I use it every once in a while and I love it.


Here is a good translation online: http://www.copticchurch.org/agpeya

I have a few translations of the Agpeya myself, it's my favourite Orthodox prayer book so far because of it's simplicity. This is my favourite Agpeya translation: http://www.coepaonline.org/downDetails.php?nav=downloads&cat_id=1&subcat_id=23&thrdcat_id=29 (top of the page).

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« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2009, 09:08:07 AM »

I have the Jordanville prayer book in English and Slavonic, the Old Orthodox Prayer Book, the Old Rite Horologion, and the Agpeya (Coptic prayer book). Out of all of them, the Old Orthodox prayer book gets used the most. I love how the prayers are set up and it also contains the Hours (but not Compline) and a variety of canons which is really nice. It also shows where bows and prostrations are to be made during prayer also so it really gives you the feel of really traditional Orthodox worship in it's purest form. I have always spoken very highly of the Old Orthodox prayer book since in my opinion it's the best one out there. 

Do you use your Agbeya. This also looks like a good little prayerbook.

Yeah, I use it every once in a while and I love it.


Here is a good translation online: http://www.copticchurch.org/agpeya

I have a few translations of the Agpeya myself, it's my favourite Orthodox prayer book so far because of it's simplicity. This is my favourite Agpeya translation: http://www.coepaonline.org/downDetails.php?nav=downloads&cat_id=1&subcat_id=23&thrdcat_id=29 (top of the page).



That is nice also and it's about the same traslation as the hard copy that I have but I have one on the way that is similar to the translation on the website I posted which has the older type language which I prefer.
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« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2009, 01:55:21 AM »

I have the UOC, OCA, Jordanville, GOA, and Antiochian prayer books.

What prayer book does the OCA publish?
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« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2009, 02:05:02 AM »

Orthodox Prayer Book by Holy Protection Monastery.

Can anyone fill me in on this prayer book a bit more?  Are there any PDF samples anywhere?
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« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2009, 05:21:43 PM »

Orthodox Prayer Book by Holy Protection Monastery.

Can anyone fill me in on this prayer book a bit more?  Are there any PDF samples anywhere?

No PDF samples unfortunately, but you can get in it here or here, and here's the table of contents:

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« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2009, 06:19:58 PM »

Well... I've been given several: UOC prayerbook (by my godfather, a Ukrainian priest), the Antiochian prayerbook (Little Red Prayerbook) and the Antiochian service book, the Jordanville Prayerbook, the Old Believers (Erie) Prayerbook, the Holy Transfiguration Prayerbook, My Daily Orthodox Prayerbook, A Manual of the Hours of the Orthodox Church, Orthodox Prayers for Everyday and my all-time favorite: Prayerbook and Common Discipline (from the Fellowship of St Philip the Evangelist).

Years ago I was given the last prayerbook (from the Fellowship of St Philip) and the words which were prayed over time became part of me. I still use it but for the most part it is learned by heart. I seldom (if ever, really) pick up the other prayerbooks. It just seems to me that it's better to learn the prayers (whichever prayerbook you choose) and to  stick with them so that they become a part of your psyche. That way you're not always fumbling with the book.

Just my two cents. I'm certainly not against having a lot of prayerbooks but for the most part, all but one of mine just sit and gather dust. And quite frankly, I'd rather have it that way simply because, switching from book to book would end up confusing me and make the learning of these prayers by heart that much more difficult.
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« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2009, 06:23:33 PM »

I've heard there is some significant controversy attached to the jordanville prayer book, but it seems to be very popular.
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« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2009, 06:31:06 PM »

Significant? That's a strong word. Not that I'm aware of but I suppose there is always going to be some who find fault with just about anything. The Jordanville Prayerbook is an excellent publication. It's not my favorite but I do use it on occasion (i.e. the Canon to the Theotokos).
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« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2009, 06:53:08 PM »

Quote
I've heard there is some significant controversy attached to the jordanville prayer book, but it seems to be very popular.

Fwiw, while I have spoken negatively of the Jordanville Prayer book a couple times in the past for personal reasons*, the only thing I've ever seen about it that seemed controversial was in this thread.


*Reasons I no longer hold to, so that I have no issues with the JPB now.
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« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2009, 09:00:44 PM »

I've used a Jordanville PB for years, along with others, and had never noticed that.  One thing I did always find a little amusing about the Jordanville PB was the prayers for the suffering Russian lands and I think isn't there a reference to the Godless authorities?  I've seen the new edition and it still has prayers for the suffering Russian people.  Who are they suffering at the hands of now?
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« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2009, 11:29:09 PM »

I've used a Jordanville PB for years, along with others, and had never noticed that.  One thing I did always find a little amusing about the Jordanville PB was the prayers for the suffering Russian lands and I think isn't there a reference to the Godless authorities?  I've seen the new edition and it still has prayers for the suffering Russian people.  Who are they suffering at the hands of now?

The prayers for the "suffering Russian land" and references to "Godless powers" are no longer used liturgically in ROCOR churches, now that the MP and ROCOR have reconciled. I'm sure that Jordanville will issue a new edition of its prayer book with amended prayers and litanies, though, if you know anything about publishing, this may take some time. How old is your edition (as distinct from a reprint), Tina?
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« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2009, 11:39:33 PM »

I've used a Jordanville PB for years, along with others, and had never noticed that.  One thing I did always find a little amusing about the Jordanville PB was the prayers for the suffering Russian lands and I think isn't there a reference to the Godless authorities?  I've seen the new edition and it still has prayers for the suffering Russian people.  Who are they suffering at the hands of now?

The prayers for the "suffering Russian land" and references to "Godless powers" are no longer used liturgically in ROCOR churches, now that the MP and ROCOR have reconciled. I'm sure that Jordanville will issue a new edition of its prayer book with amended prayers and litanies, though, if you know anything about publishing, this may take some time. How old is your edition (as distinct from a reprint), Tina?

My personal copy is the 4th Edition from 1986, but I'm selling the latest edition in our parish bookstore.
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« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2010, 03:00:02 PM »

Orthodox Prayer Book by Holy Protection Monastery.

Can anyone fill me in on this prayer book a bit more?  Are there any PDF samples anywhere?

No PDF samples unfortunately, but you can get in it here or here, and here's the table of contents:



I know this is an old thread but after seeing this, I ordered a copy of this from St. Anthony's. Just recieved it today. It reminds me a lot of the little red prayer book (which I owned but have apparently misplaced because I've not been able to find it anywhere...) but has the advantage of being a hardcover book. It does not contain the Divine Liturgy but does include a nice selection of occasional prayers - very much geared towards private prayer. The Jordanville is nice and I am glad to have it but I'd tend to use this one more on a daily basis than the Jordanville.
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« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2010, 04:59:25 PM »

I carry the Antiochian red prayerbook in my work bag for those times I get stuck for several hours with nothing to do. It has helped me through many a long session in district court.

At home I use the HTM prayerbook, and it is sufficient for my purposes. My modern tongue sometimes stumbles over the somewhat archaic English, but not enough to bother me (I have a certain affinity for the KJV, as well, and have used it for the Psalms).
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« Reply #24 on: August 05, 2010, 06:12:47 PM »

I carry the Antiochian red prayerbook in my work bag for those times I get stuck for several hours with nothing to do. It has helped me through many a long session in district court.

At home I use the HTM prayerbook, and it is sufficient for my purposes. My modern tongue sometimes stumbles over the somewhat archaic English, but not enough to bother me (I have a certain affinity for the KJV, as well, and have used it for the Psalms).

I need to order another red prayerbook to carry in my car. I am yet on the front porch of Orthodoxy (hopefully not for much longer though) but I find the prayers nourish the soul.

Growing up with the KJV and later serving in an Anglican mission where we still used the 1928 BCP and KJV, I got pretty used to it. I've tried a number of different Bible translations but always return to the KJV.

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« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2010, 12:26:27 AM »

another thing I would add about the Orthodox Prayer Book published by Holy Protection Monastery (again purchased from St. Anthony GO monastery), it is in rendered in modern english - i.e. no "thee" and "thou" type wording.
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