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Author Topic: Growing up Orthodox around 1950's Catholics?  (Read 5606 times) Average Rating: 0
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elijahmaria
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« Reply #45 on: July 12, 2011, 12:09:47 PM »

While I certainly can't comment on what it was like growing up in Pennsylvania or other areas like that, here's a p.s. for you: everyone in the U.S. is an ethnic American of some variety. Everyone's family came from somewhere else (except Native Americans, of course!) - the only difference is sooner or later.

Is there a point here? 

Oh, sorry that I was not clear enough - let me try to clarify for you: I was expressing an opinion about a couple of posts here, comparing "plain old vanilla Americans" with the wonderful rich culture of "ethnics." On the contrary, everyone in America is a "hyphenated American" and can claim a rich ethnic heritage, whether or not they choose to emphasize or dwell on it.

"Preserve" would be an alternate verb to express what some cultural and linguistic groups do.

My daughter is bi-racial and she does what is commonly called code-switching.  She fits well in any one of several social and familial settings and has the education to allow her to make it all pretty seamless.  What she preserves is an internal calm amidst the noise of family and friends from a variety of walks of life.  I think she is pretty sterling an example of the melting pot.

I have never met a "plain old white bread" American, though I've met more than my fair share of gummy white bread consumers... Cheesy

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« Reply #46 on: July 12, 2011, 12:35:07 PM »

Even though I'm just an overzealous former Protestant convert to Catholicism, this thread has been an interesting read.
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« Reply #47 on: July 12, 2011, 12:37:20 PM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

A crying shame...
All of this is true from one still there. Until a few years ago, there was a locally owned oldies rock station that used to play Christmas music on the new & old calendar dates and every Sunday would broadcast the Divine Liturgy from Sts. Cyril & Methodius Byzantine Catholic Church in Olyphant, Pa. These passing images will probably cease altogether in the next decade as the RCC (& probably Orthodox) parishes will sadly fade into oblivion.
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« Reply #48 on: July 12, 2011, 12:57:54 PM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

A crying shame...
All of this is true from one still there. Until a few years ago, there was a locally owned oldies rock station that used to play Christmas music on the new & old calendar dates and every Sunday would broadcast the Divine Liturgy from Sts. Cyril & Methodius Byzantine Catholic Church in Olyphant, Pa. These passing images will probably cease altogether in the next decade as the RCC (& probably Orthodox) parishes will sadly fade into oblivion.

Sits and stares at monitor with chin resting on fists...

Any ideas?
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« Reply #49 on: July 12, 2011, 01:16:00 PM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.
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« Reply #50 on: July 12, 2011, 01:25:30 PM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

A crying shame...
All of this is true from one still there. Until a few years ago, there was a locally owned oldies rock station that used to play Christmas music on the new & old calendar dates and every Sunday would broadcast the Divine Liturgy from Sts. Cyril & Methodius Byzantine Catholic Church in Olyphant, Pa. These passing images will probably cease altogether in the next decade as the RCC (& probably Orthodox) parishes will sadly fade into oblivion.

Sits and stares at monitor with chin resting on fists...

Any ideas?
I remember as a youth I used to snicker at polkas & yet had a most offbeat & reverential attitude towards & still listen to them on the radio at times.
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« Reply #51 on: July 12, 2011, 01:55:12 PM »

I have never met a "plain old white bread" American, though I've met more than my fair share of gummy white bread consumers... Cheesy


Exactly! Grin
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« Reply #52 on: July 12, 2011, 06:28:10 PM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!
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« Reply #53 on: July 12, 2011, 07:59:38 PM »

I have never met a "plain old white bread" American, though I've met more than my fair share of gummy white bread consumers... Cheesy


Exactly! Grin

I LOVE it when we agree!!!!!!!!.... laugh
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« Reply #54 on: July 12, 2011, 08:01:34 PM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink
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« Reply #55 on: July 12, 2011, 08:19:06 PM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink

I'm sure it will be heaven on earth! Where I am now there are a lot of Orthodox churches too, but not as many as in western PA. I might even be able to go to a ROCOR parish out there, since I know there are a lot of them in western PA. Here there is only one and its far from my home.
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« Reply #56 on: July 13, 2011, 07:47:40 AM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink

I'm sure it will be heaven on earth! Where I am now there are a lot of Orthodox churches too, but not as many as in western PA. I might even be able to go to a ROCOR parish out there, since I know there are a lot of them in western PA. Here there is only one and its far from my home.

I think you may be the only person here, poised to leave the Catholic Church, that I can say I am actually sorry that you are leaving the Catholic Church.  I suppose it is because I am not following your reasoning for rejecting the Catholic Church.  I hope I don't get into trouble for saying so.  Generally I will support someone moving for the salvation of their souls regardless of rationale...but I don't hear that from you.  I suppose I am curious and have just screwed up the courage to say so...

M.
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« Reply #57 on: July 13, 2011, 08:54:26 AM »

In the plague years during the colonial period in Philadelphia, the Irish were the ones to clean up the bodies of the dead and dying poor, not the Africans whose lives and bodies were actually worth something.




The Irish Slave Trade – The Forgotten “White” Slaves
The Slaves That Time Forgot

By John Martin

They came as slaves; vast human cargo transported on tall British ships bound for the Americas. They were shipped by the hundreds of thousands and included men, women, and even the youngest of children.

http://www.africaresource.com/rasta/sesostris-the-great-the-egyptian-hercules/the-irish-slave-trade-forgotten-white-slaves/

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« Reply #58 on: July 13, 2011, 09:19:36 AM »

This is not completely related to the OP, but I was reminded of this when reading it.

My great grandparents came to the USA from Poland in the 1860's.  They were very religious.  My great grandfather had a rather large farm, and would always let gypsies camp out on the farm overnight, as much as my grandmother protested. I'm told that they would go outside and pray the rosary with them.  The only price for staying on his land, my great grandfather told them, was that they had to join the family for mass the next morning.  I'm told that I even have relatives from that family who married gypsies!

interesting side-note:  My grandmother told me that if a gypsy ever comes to your door, make the sign of the cross and say "Mother of God, protect me" so that they won't hypnotize you and steel the silver  Wink

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« Reply #59 on: July 13, 2011, 10:07:17 AM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink

I'm sure it will be heaven on earth! Where I am now there are a lot of Orthodox churches too, but not as many as in western PA. I might even be able to go to a ROCOR parish out there, since I know there are a lot of them in western PA. Here there is only one and its far from my home.

I think you may be the only person here, poised to leave the Catholic Church, that I can say I am actually sorry that you are leaving the Catholic Church.  I suppose it is because I am not following your reasoning for rejecting the Catholic Church.  I hope I don't get into trouble for saying so.  Generally I will support someone moving for the salvation of their souls regardless of rationale...but I don't hear that from you.  I suppose I am curious and have just screwed up the courage to say so...

M.

Its complicated (btw there is an Orthodox Christian poster on here---Marc1152--who asked me to stay with the RCC because he dislikes some of my views on the religion of my birth...Judaism). He felt the Orthodox Church has enough people who are critical of Judaism, and he felt the RCC could better afford to keep me. So you're not the only one who would like me to stay Roman Catholic.

My primary reason for leaving is because I finally came to understand the difference between the way the RCC views church authority and the way the Orthodox church does.

Because of my attachment to the Traditional RC church and Tridentine Mass as opposed to the post-V2 RCC, I came to have issues with the idea of authority, esp. when I feel the church is telling me to believe or do something that goes against centuries of church practice and teaching. Once I understood that in the Orthodox church, the first fidelity is to the Scriptures and the Church Fathers, as opposed to what a modern clergy might be telling us to do, I understood what, in my view, is the "true church".

The RCC stresses obedience above all else. I had issues with that when it came to the Tridentine Mass and the rest of pre-V2 Catholicism. I was not about to switch from the Triderntine Mass to clown Masses, just because an RCC cleric told me to do so. Fidelity to the Truth, to me, is more important than obedience to a clergyman.

In Orthodoxy, if even a metropolitan tells you to believe something different from what the Church Fathers taught or what Scriptures teach, an Orthodox Christian is dutybound to break communion with him.

I find it ironic that my love of TRADITIONAL Catholicism is what led me to this point. I have since come to have other issues too, such as doubting papal infallibility and a few others. But the crux of it is the authority issue.
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« Reply #60 on: July 13, 2011, 10:19:04 AM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink

I'm sure it will be heaven on earth! Where I am now there are a lot of Orthodox churches too, but not as many as in western PA. I might even be able to go to a ROCOR parish out there, since I know there are a lot of them in western PA. Here there is only one and its far from my home.

I think you may be the only person here, poised to leave the Catholic Church, that I can say I am actually sorry that you are leaving the Catholic Church.  I suppose it is because I am not following your reasoning for rejecting the Catholic Church.  I hope I don't get into trouble for saying so.  Generally I will support someone moving for the salvation of their souls regardless of rationale...but I don't hear that from you.  I suppose I am curious and have just screwed up the courage to say so...

M.

Its complicated (btw there is an Orthodox Christian poster on here---Marc1152--who asked me to stay with the RCC because he dislikes some of my views on the religion of my birth...Judaism). He felt the Orthodox Church has enough people who are critical of Judaism, and he felt the RCC could better afford to keep me. So you're not the only one who would like me to stay Roman Catholic.

My primary reason for leaving is because I finally came to understand the difference between the way the RCC views church authority and the way the Orthodox church does.

Because of my attachment to the Traditional RC church and Tridentine Mass as opposed to the post-V2 RCC, I came to have issues with the idea of authority, esp. when I feel the church is telling me to believe or do something that goes against centuries of church practice and teaching. Once I understood that in the Orthodox church, the first fidelity is to the Scriptures and the Church Fathers, as opposed to what a modern clergy might be telling us to do, I understood what, in my view, is the "true church".

The RCC stresses obedience above all else. I had issues with that when it came to the Tridentine Mass and the rest of pre-V2 Catholicism. I was not about to switch from the Triderntine Mass to clown Masses, just because an RCC cleric told me to do so. Fidelity to the Truth, to me, is more important than obedience to a clergyman.

In Orthodoxy, if even a metropolitan tells you to believe something different from what the Church Fathers taught or what Scriptures teach, an Orthodox Christian is dutybound to break communion with him.

I find it ironic that my love of TRADITIONAL Catholicism is what led me to this point. I have since come to have other issues too, such as doubting papal infallibility and a few others. But the crux of it is the authority issue.

I think you are mistaken on a couple of points here with respect to Orthodoxy but I am not going to argue them with you.  I think your position does Orthodoxy a disservice. 

But I do see your difficulty with obedience when it does not align itself with your own determinations.  I don't think that is unusual at all.  I think it is a poor reason to reject the Church of your baptism.  I would say much the same thing to a person leaving the Roman rite for an eastern Catholic jurisdiction also for the same expressed reasons...in fact I have said the same thing.  Except they are not participating in schism...so that part is left out.

It is difficult to say these things because at some level they are a cut across your person as well as your perspective, and I like you, and hope you will find interior peace...On the other hand I don't expect to change your mind so in that sense what I say or think is harmless.

M.
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« Reply #61 on: July 13, 2011, 10:45:21 AM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink

I'm sure it will be heaven on earth! Where I am now there are a lot of Orthodox churches too, but not as many as in western PA. I might even be able to go to a ROCOR parish out there, since I know there are a lot of them in western PA. Here there is only one and its far from my home.

I think you may be the only person here, poised to leave the Catholic Church, that I can say I am actually sorry that you are leaving the Catholic Church.  I suppose it is because I am not following your reasoning for rejecting the Catholic Church.  I hope I don't get into trouble for saying so.  Generally I will support someone moving for the salvation of their souls regardless of rationale...but I don't hear that from you.  I suppose I am curious and have just screwed up the courage to say so...

M.

Its complicated (btw there is an Orthodox Christian poster on here---Marc1152--who asked me to stay with the RCC because he dislikes some of my views on the religion of my birth...Judaism). He felt the Orthodox Church has enough people who are critical of Judaism, and he felt the RCC could better afford to keep me. So you're not the only one who would like me to stay Roman Catholic.

My primary reason for leaving is because I finally came to understand the difference between the way the RCC views church authority and the way the Orthodox church does.

Because of my attachment to the Traditional RC church and Tridentine Mass as opposed to the post-V2 RCC, I came to have issues with the idea of authority, esp. when I feel the church is telling me to believe or do something that goes against centuries of church practice and teaching. Once I understood that in the Orthodox church, the first fidelity is to the Scriptures and the Church Fathers, as opposed to what a modern clergy might be telling us to do, I understood what, in my view, is the "true church".

The RCC stresses obedience above all else. I had issues with that when it came to the Tridentine Mass and the rest of pre-V2 Catholicism. I was not about to switch from the Triderntine Mass to clown Masses, just because an RCC cleric told me to do so. Fidelity to the Truth, to me, is more important than obedience to a clergyman.

In Orthodoxy, if even a metropolitan tells you to believe something different from what the Church Fathers taught or what Scriptures teach, an Orthodox Christian is dutybound to break communion with him.

I find it ironic that my love of TRADITIONAL Catholicism is what led me to this point. I have since come to have other issues too, such as doubting papal infallibility and a few others. But the crux of it is the authority issue.

I think you are mistaken on a couple of points here with respect to Orthodoxy but I am not going to argue them with you.  I think your position does Orthodoxy a disservice.  

But I do see your difficulty with obedience when it does not align itself with your own determinations.  I don't think that is unusual at all.  I think it is a poor reason to reject the Church of your baptism.  I would say much the same thing to a person leaving the Roman rite for an eastern Catholic jurisdiction also for the same expressed reasons...in fact I have said the same thing.  Except they are not participating in schism...so that part is left out.

It is difficult to say these things because at some level they are a cut across your person as well as your perspective, and I like you, and hope you will find interior peace...On the other hand I don't expect to change your mind so in that sense what I say or think is harmless.

M.

This article helped me make my decision: http://orthodoxinfo.com/inquirers/rome_orth.aspx I'm glad I stumbled upon it, because it addressed the real crux of my issue.

You see, a number of years ago, I worked with a few others in anti-cult work, to get kids out of mindcontrol cults (Moonies, Hare Krsnas, Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism, etc) One central aspect of all these groups is a  very high priority placed on unquestioning obedience to the group leaders. So when a church tells me I must obey no matter what, my antenna goes up right away.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2011, 11:03:18 AM by Xenia1918 » Logged

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« Reply #62 on: July 13, 2011, 11:39:57 AM »

interesting side-note:  My grandmother told me that if a gypsy ever comes to your door, make the sign of the cross and say "Mother of God, protect me" so that they won't hypnotize you and steel the silver  Wink



I was talking with a GOA bishop from Greece who said (I'm not entirely sure how the subject of gypsies came up in our conversation) that his grandmother wouldn't let him go out and play when the gypsies came through: "because they steal blue-eyed children!" Oddly enough, my Southern Baptist great-grandmother told my blue-eyed mother the same thing, when she was a child!
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« Reply #63 on: July 13, 2011, 11:44:13 AM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink

I'm sure it will be heaven on earth! Where I am now there are a lot of Orthodox churches too, but not as many as in western PA. I might even be able to go to a ROCOR parish out there, since I know there are a lot of them in western PA. Here there is only one and its far from my home.

I think you may be the only person here, poised to leave the Catholic Church, that I can say I am actually sorry that you are leaving the Catholic Church.  I suppose it is because I am not following your reasoning for rejecting the Catholic Church.  I hope I don't get into trouble for saying so.  Generally I will support someone moving for the salvation of their souls regardless of rationale...but I don't hear that from you.  I suppose I am curious and have just screwed up the courage to say so...

M.

Its complicated (btw there is an Orthodox Christian poster on here---Marc1152--who asked me to stay with the RCC because he dislikes some of my views on the religion of my birth...Judaism). He felt the Orthodox Church has enough people who are critical of Judaism, and he felt the RCC could better afford to keep me. So you're not the only one who would like me to stay Roman Catholic.

My primary reason for leaving is because I finally came to understand the difference between the way the RCC views church authority and the way the Orthodox church does.

Because of my attachment to the Traditional RC church and Tridentine Mass as opposed to the post-V2 RCC, I came to have issues with the idea of authority, esp. when I feel the church is telling me to believe or do something that goes against centuries of church practice and teaching. Once I understood that in the Orthodox church, the first fidelity is to the Scriptures and the Church Fathers, as opposed to what a modern clergy might be telling us to do, I understood what, in my view, is the "true church".

The RCC stresses obedience above all else. I had issues with that when it came to the Tridentine Mass and the rest of pre-V2 Catholicism. I was not about to switch from the Triderntine Mass to clown Masses, just because an RCC cleric told me to do so. Fidelity to the Truth, to me, is more important than obedience to a clergyman.

In Orthodoxy, if even a metropolitan tells you to believe something different from what the Church Fathers taught or what Scriptures teach, an Orthodox Christian is dutybound to break communion with him.

I find it ironic that my love of TRADITIONAL Catholicism is what led me to this point. I have since come to have other issues too, such as doubting papal infallibility and a few others. But the crux of it is the authority issue.

I think you are mistaken on a couple of points here with respect to Orthodoxy but I am not going to argue them with you.  I think your position does Orthodoxy a disservice.  

But I do see your difficulty with obedience when it does not align itself with your own determinations.  I don't think that is unusual at all.  I think it is a poor reason to reject the Church of your baptism.  I would say much the same thing to a person leaving the Roman rite for an eastern Catholic jurisdiction also for the same expressed reasons...in fact I have said the same thing.  Except they are not participating in schism...so that part is left out.

It is difficult to say these things because at some level they are a cut across your person as well as your perspective, and I like you, and hope you will find interior peace...On the other hand I don't expect to change your mind so in that sense what I say or think is harmless.

M.

This article helped me make my decision: http://orthodoxinfo.com/inquirers/rome_orth.aspx I'm glad I stumbled upon it, because it addressed the real crux of my issue.

You see, a number of years ago, I worked with a few others in anti-cult work, to get kids out of mindcontrol cults (Moonies, Hare Krsnas, Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism, etc) One central aspect of all these groups is a  very high priority placed on unquestioning obedience to the group leaders. So when a church tells me I must obey no matter what, my antenna goes up right away.

And how do you feel about the traditional Orthodox understanding of obeying one's spiritual father? 
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« Reply #64 on: July 13, 2011, 11:49:40 AM »

interesting side-note:  My grandmother told me that if a gypsy ever comes to your door, make the sign of the cross and say "Mother of God, protect me" so that they won't hypnotize you and steel the silver  Wink



I was talking with a GOA bishop from Greece who said (I'm not entirely sure how the subject of gypsies came up in our conversation) that his grandmother wouldn't let him go out and play when the gypsies came through: "because they steal blue-eyed children!" Oddly enough, my Southern Baptist great-grandmother told my blue-eyed mother the same thing, when she was a child!

I really have never understood the contempt and dislike many Europeans seem to have for the Romani people (erroneously called "gypsies" due to the belief that the originated in Egypt...they actually came from India originally.)

Did you know that the "gypsies" never kidnapped anyones children, but in Bohemia and Moravia, they actually had their children kidnapped from them, to be raised as non-"gypsies"? Sometimes non-"gypsy" children would run away and join them, and this led to the mistaken belief that they kidnapped the children...similar to the way kids in this country used to say they were going to "run away and join the circus".
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"O God, enlarge within us the sense of fellowship with all living things, our brothers the animals to whom Thou gavest the earth as their home in common with us..." (from the Prayer of St Basil the Great)

REAL RC: http://www.traditionalmass.org
REAL OC: http://www.orthodoxinfo.com
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« Reply #65 on: July 13, 2011, 11:51:51 AM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink

I'm sure it will be heaven on earth! Where I am now there are a lot of Orthodox churches too, but not as many as in western PA. I might even be able to go to a ROCOR parish out there, since I know there are a lot of them in western PA. Here there is only one and its far from my home.

I think you may be the only person here, poised to leave the Catholic Church, that I can say I am actually sorry that you are leaving the Catholic Church.  I suppose it is because I am not following your reasoning for rejecting the Catholic Church.  I hope I don't get into trouble for saying so.  Generally I will support someone moving for the salvation of their souls regardless of rationale...but I don't hear that from you.  I suppose I am curious and have just screwed up the courage to say so...

M.

Its complicated (btw there is an Orthodox Christian poster on here---Marc1152--who asked me to stay with the RCC because he dislikes some of my views on the religion of my birth...Judaism). He felt the Orthodox Church has enough people who are critical of Judaism, and he felt the RCC could better afford to keep me. So you're not the only one who would like me to stay Roman Catholic.

My primary reason for leaving is because I finally came to understand the difference between the way the RCC views church authority and the way the Orthodox church does.

Because of my attachment to the Traditional RC church and Tridentine Mass as opposed to the post-V2 RCC, I came to have issues with the idea of authority, esp. when I feel the church is telling me to believe or do something that goes against centuries of church practice and teaching. Once I understood that in the Orthodox church, the first fidelity is to the Scriptures and the Church Fathers, as opposed to what a modern clergy might be telling us to do, I understood what, in my view, is the "true church".

The RCC stresses obedience above all else. I had issues with that when it came to the Tridentine Mass and the rest of pre-V2 Catholicism. I was not about to switch from the Tridentine Mass to clown Masses, just because an RCC cleric told me to do so. Fidelity to the Truth, to me, is more important than obedience to a clergyman.

In Orthodoxy, if even a metropolitan tells you to believe something different from what the Church Fathers taught or what Scriptures teach, an Orthodox Christian is dutybound to break communion with him.

I find it ironic that my love of TRADITIONAL Catholicism is what led me to this point. I have since come to have other issues too, such as doubting papal infallibility and a few others. But the crux of it is the authority issue.

I think you are mistaken on a couple of points here with respect to Orthodoxy but I am not going to argue them with you.  I think your position does Orthodoxy a disservice.  

But I do see your difficulty with obedience when it does not align itself with your own determinations.  I don't think that is unusual at all.  I think it is a poor reason to reject the Church of your baptism.  I would say much the same thing to a person leaving the Roman rite for an eastern Catholic jurisdiction also for the same expressed reasons...in fact I have said the same thing.  Except they are not participating in schism...so that part is left out.

It is difficult to say these things because at some level they are a cut across your person as well as your perspective, and I like you, and hope you will find interior peace...On the other hand I don't expect to change your mind so in that sense what I say or think is harmless.

M.

This article helped me make my decision: http://orthodoxinfo.com/inquirers/rome_orth.aspx I'm glad I stumbled upon it, because it addressed the real crux of my issue.

You see, a number of years ago, I worked with a few others in anti-cult work, to get kids out of mindcontrol cults (Moonies, Hare Krsnas, Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism, etc) One central aspect of all these groups is a  very high priority placed on unquestioning obedience to the group leaders. So when a church tells me I must obey no matter what, my antenna goes up right away.

And how do you feel about the traditional Orthodox understanding of obeying one's spiritual father?  

I have no problem with it at all, as long as he is orthodox (lower case "o" as well as upper case "O"). My issue is with BLIND, UNTHINKING obedience, not obedience that is fully informed by the teachings and canons of the ancient Church. For example, if a priest told me to stop attending the Divine Liturgy and instead go to one held by a renegade liberal "Orthodox" church that has female priests and has clown Divine Liturgies (God forbid), do you think I'm going to obey him?
« Last Edit: July 13, 2011, 11:54:53 AM by Xenia1918 » Logged

"O God, enlarge within us the sense of fellowship with all living things, our brothers the animals to whom Thou gavest the earth as their home in common with us..." (from the Prayer of St Basil the Great)

REAL RC: http://www.traditionalmass.org
REAL OC: http://www.orthodoxinfo.com
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« Reply #66 on: July 13, 2011, 12:04:16 PM »

interesting side-note:  My grandmother told me that if a gypsy ever comes to your door, make the sign of the cross and say "Mother of God, protect me" so that they won't hypnotize you and steel the silver  Wink



I was talking with a GOA bishop from Greece who said (I'm not entirely sure how the subject of gypsies came up in our conversation) that his grandmother wouldn't let him go out and play when the gypsies came through: "because they steal blue-eyed children!" Oddly enough, my Southern Baptist great-grandmother told my blue-eyed mother the same thing, when she was a child!

I really have never understood the contempt and dislike many Europeans seem to have for the Romani people (erroneously called "gypsies" due to the belief that the originated in Egypt...they actually came from India originally.)

Did you know that the "gypsies" never kidnapped anyones children, but in Bohemia and Moravia, they actually had their children kidnapped from them, to be raised as non-"gypsies"? Sometimes non-"gypsy" children would run away and join them, and this led to the mistaken belief that they kidnapped the children...similar to the way kids in this country used to say they were going to "run away and join the circus".

Probably because they are the ultimate "xeni." There were, and still are, Irish "gypsies" who traveled throughout the South: Irish Travellers. I remember seeing their horse-drawn wagons as a child - though now of course they are settled and have SUVs and pick ups. There is a community of them outside Augusta, GA. They are very clannish. When they still travelled, they were horse and mule traders and would come through Atlanta twice a year for baptisms, marriages and funerals at Sacred Heart.
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« Reply #67 on: July 13, 2011, 12:29:09 PM »



I have no problem with it at all, as long as he is orthodox (lower case "o" as well as upper case "O"). My issue is with BLIND, UNTHINKING obedience, not obedience that is fully informed by the teachings and canons of the ancient Church. For example, if a priest told me to stop attending the Divine Liturgy and instead go to one held by a renegade liberal "Orthodox" church that has female priests and has clown Divine Liturgies (God forbid), do you think I'm going to obey him?

I am not going to dwell too heavily on the fact that you are over-stating the so-called evils of the Novus Ordo...and you certainly are.

However:

1) The Catholic Church has never asked, much less demanded, "blind" obedience of faith.  The Church does request obedience of will and intellect in all things but sin...thereby strongly recommending that one consider how the teaching, or action of the Church might be correct, before we attack it for being heretical or evil.

2) Orthodoxy asks the same thing in fact.  Which is why I think your reasons for becoming Orthodox could use a very serious bit of rethinking.

M.
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« Reply #68 on: July 13, 2011, 12:42:22 PM »

I lived in Wilkes-Barre, PA.  In our parish school [I was Polish Catholic at the time], during my freshman year, we had a student who was Russian Orthodox.  Before she arrived the nuns told us about her and her religion and that we were to respect her and her beliefs.  At the same time, one of my classmates was Protestant and never did the nuns try to convert him.  It was common to see many golden-domed churches with 3-bar crosses, both Orthodox and Eastern rite.  Every year on January 7th, our local tv stations always had an announcement greeting those who celebrated Christmas on the Julian calendar.  Everyone got along very fine.

Pennsylvania is/was the heartland of American Orthodoxy.  I guess that the population has unfortunately declined in recnet years due to the collapse of the coal/steel industry and many young people have moved out of state to more greener pastures.  I've heard that there are many beautiful Orthodox parishes which used to have thousands of members in the old days, and now can only clam a few hundred (if that).  Same goes for the RC churches.  It's a shame.

I remember one monk refering to PA as the "Holy Land of the US" due to all the golden domes and 3-bar crosses.  AHH, the good old days.

This is one reason why I consider myself blessed to have been born and raised in PA, and since we plan to move to western PA once my husband retires (where his family is from and still resides), I don't think I will ever have a problem with finding an Orthodox parish! Smiley

We once drove through a town called Minersville, when we last went to see his family....3 bar crosses and gold domes EVERYWHERE!

You WILL love it.  From my house to your house...future house...is indeed a holy land in America.  That is no joke!!...Maybe I'll even come and visit!!... Wink

I'm sure it will be heaven on earth! Where I am now there are a lot of Orthodox churches too, but not as many as in western PA. I might even be able to go to a ROCOR parish out there, since I know there are a lot of them in western PA. Here there is only one and its far from my home.

I think you may be the only person here, poised to leave the Catholic Church, that I can say I am actually sorry that you are leaving the Catholic Church.  I suppose it is because I am not following your reasoning for rejecting the Catholic Church.  I hope I don't get into trouble for saying so.  Generally I will support someone moving for the salvation of their souls regardless of rationale...but I don't hear that from you.  I suppose I am curious and have just screwed up the courage to say so...

M.

Its complicated (btw there is an Orthodox Christian poster on here---Marc1152--who asked me to stay with the RCC because he dislikes some of my views on the religion of my birth...Judaism). He felt the Orthodox Church has enough people who are critical of Judaism, and he felt the RCC could better afford to keep me. So you're not the only one who would like me to stay Roman Catholic.

My primary reason for leaving is because I finally came to understand the difference between the way the RCC views church authority and the way the Orthodox church does.

Because of my attachment to the Traditional RC church and Tridentine Mass as opposed to the post-V2 RCC, I came to have issues with the idea of authority, esp. when I feel the church is telling me to believe or do something that goes against centuries of church practice and teaching. Once I understood that in the Orthodox church, the first fidelity is to the Scriptures and the Church Fathers, as opposed to what a modern clergy might be telling us to do, I understood what, in my view, is the "true church".

The RCC stresses obedience above all else. I had issues with that when it came to the Tridentine Mass and the rest of pre-V2 Catholicism. I was not about to switch from the Tridentine Mass to clown Masses, just because an RCC cleric told me to do so. Fidelity to the Truth, to me, is more important than obedience to a clergyman.

In Orthodoxy, if even a metropolitan tells you to believe something different from what the Church Fathers taught or what Scriptures teach, an Orthodox Christian is dutybound to break communion with him.

I find it ironic that my love of TRADITIONAL Catholicism is what led me to this point. I have since come to have other issues too, such as doubting papal infallibility and a few others. But the crux of it is the authority issue.

I think you are mistaken on a couple of points here with respect to Orthodoxy but I am not going to argue them with you.  I think your position does Orthodoxy a disservice.  

But I do see your difficulty with obedience when it does not align itself with your own determinations.  I don't think that is unusual at all.  I think it is a poor reason to reject the Church of your baptism.  I would say much the same thing to a person leaving the Roman rite for an eastern Catholic jurisdiction also for the same expressed reasons...in fact I have said the same thing.  Except they are not participating in schism...so that part is left out.

It is difficult to say these things because at some level they are a cut across your person as well as your perspective, and I like you, and hope you will find interior peace...On the other hand I don't expect to change your mind so in that sense what I say or think is harmless.

M.

This article helped me make my decision: http://orthodoxinfo.com/inquirers/rome_orth.aspx I'm glad I stumbled upon it, because it addressed the real crux of my issue.

You see, a number of years ago, I worked with a few others in anti-cult work, to get kids out of mindcontrol cults (Moonies, Hare Krsnas, Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism, etc) One central aspect of all these groups is a  very high priority placed on unquestioning obedience to the group leaders. So when a church tells me I must obey no matter what, my antenna goes up right away.

And how do you feel about the traditional Orthodox understanding of obeying one's spiritual father?  

I have no problem with it at all, as long as he is orthodox (lower case "o" as well as upper case "O"). My issue is with BLIND, UNTHINKING obedience, not obedience that is fully informed by the teachings and canons of the ancient Church. For example, if a priest told me to stop attending the Divine Liturgy and instead go to one held by a renegade liberal "Orthodox" church that has female priests and has clown Divine Liturgies (God forbid), do you think I'm going to obey him?

I can only say that you are in for a rude awakening, as there certainly are Orthodox priests whose attitudes mirror those of the Baby Boomer RC priests who are fast going the way of the dodo.  Relativism is not the sole property of certain Roman Catholics.
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« Reply #69 on: July 13, 2011, 01:01:50 PM »


I can only say that you are in for a rude awakening, as there certainly are Orthodox priests whose attitudes mirror those of the Baby Boomer RC priests who are fast going the way of the dodo.  Relativism is not the sole property of certain Roman Catholics.

Simply as an aside:  Have you been following the two opposing Facebook groups dealing with issues of human sexuality in Orthodoxy?...specifically the OCA in terms of home jurisdiction for many of the correspondents.

One of the clear messages of the more traditional grouping is the fact that the "Church says no..." when it comes to the reception or non-reception of active homosexuals at the chalice.

Certainly the opposing group is raising stiff opposition to the proscription against active homosexual behaviors using Scripture and Tradition.

The outcome taken to its logical conclusion for those excluded is to schism and form their own Church who, in their eyes, are more faithful to the teachings of Jesus, Scripture and Tradition.
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« Reply #70 on: July 13, 2011, 01:20:37 PM »

Nope, I had no idea it was going on and will most likely forget about it by the end of the day Smiley
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« Reply #71 on: July 13, 2011, 01:37:57 PM »

Nope, I had no idea it was going on and will most likely forget about it by the end of the day Smiley

The population of Orthodoxy in this country is small enough so that I don't think it should be ignored...entirely.  I am not sure that Schultz needs to burden an otherwise peaceful life... Wink
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« Reply #72 on: July 13, 2011, 02:19:38 PM »

Nope, I had no idea it was going on and will most likely forget about it by the end of the day Smiley

The population of Orthodoxy in this country is small enough so that I don't think it should be ignored...entirely.  I am not sure that Schultz needs to burden an otherwise peaceful life... Wink

As a Catholic, I was fond of saying, "I'm glad I'm not the Pope!"

As an Orthodox, I can say the same thing, only change Pope to Metropolitan (being a member of the OCA).

When I have some modicum of control over my own passions and vices, perhaps I'll turn an eye to pointless bickering amongst the Interneteratti (tm) on facebook, of all places.
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« Reply #73 on: July 13, 2011, 02:24:47 PM »

Nope, I had no idea it was going on and will most likely forget about it by the end of the day Smiley

The population of Orthodoxy in this country is small enough so that I don't think it should be ignored...entirely.  I am not sure that Schultz needs to burden an otherwise peaceful life... Wink

As a Catholic, I was fond of saying, "I'm glad I'm not the Pope!"

As an Orthodox, I can say the same thing, only change Pope to Metropolitan (being a member of the OCA).

When I have some modicum of control over my own passions and vices, perhaps I'll turn an eye to pointless bickering amongst the Interneteratti (tm) on facebook, of all places.

As these things tend to go, I find these two groups actually catching my interest more often than not.  It's not terribly strident on either side though there are moments...but they can be easily ignored.  I joined up with both just to read and see what is available electronically in terms of Orthodox responses.  Some pretty good things, I think.

M.
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« Reply #74 on: July 13, 2011, 03:33:28 PM »

I'm friends with a few Orthodox priests, and I find that listening to their advice is often a very good thing. One that I've been sharing a lot of my thoughts and feelings with advises against internet messageboards designed for Orthodox Christians, he said anyone can join, and say anything they want...and he thinks its not a good venue for newbies to Orthodoxy to be at. He said that the RCC is not the only church that has been infected with modernists and liberals, and that one can be led astray very easily in fora like this one.
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« Reply #75 on: July 13, 2011, 03:52:43 PM »

I'm friends with a few Orthodox priests, and I find that listening to their advice is often a very good thing. One that I've been sharing a lot of my thoughts and feelings with advises against internet messageboards designed for Orthodox Christians, he said anyone can join, and say anything they want...and he thinks its not a good venue for newbies to Orthodoxy to be at. He said that the RCC is not the only church that has been infected with modernists and liberals, and that one can be led astray very easily in fora like this one.

Well...we'll miss you... Wink
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« Reply #76 on: July 13, 2011, 04:42:13 PM »

Nope, I had no idea it was going on and will most likely forget about it by the end of the day Smiley

Never fear, before I go to bed I'll post a reminder.   angel
« Last Edit: July 13, 2011, 04:46:56 PM by Peter J » Logged

- Peter Jericho (a CAF poster)
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