Author Topic: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?  (Read 4038 times)

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Offline Eugenio

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Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« on: August 26, 2009, 05:52:27 PM »
Okay folks, another Greek coffee question:

Is there a substantive difference between "Greek Coffee" and "Turkish Coffee"? Or are they different terms for the same coffee? (depending upon which country you like better?)

 ???

Offline Αριστοκλής

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2009, 06:12:55 PM »
Is sdcheung around?  ;) ....no difference.


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Offline Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2009, 07:41:01 PM »
No substantive difference. The competing national provenances are similar to Baklava (neither Turkish or Greek) and Moussaka (more than likely created by a Greek cook working as a cook for a Turkish big shot).

Offline Αριστοκλής

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2009, 10:16:44 PM »
No substantive difference. The competing national provenances are similar to Baklava (neither Turkish or Greek) and Moussaka (more than likely created by a Greek cook working as a cook for a Turkish big shot).
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Offline Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2009, 09:05:52 AM »
No substantive difference. The competing national provenances are similar to Baklava (neither Turkish or Greek) and Moussaka (more than likely created by a Greek cook working as a cook for a Turkish big shot).
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Offline Fr. George

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2009, 12:38:40 PM »
Okay folks, another Greek coffee question:

Is there a substantive difference between "Greek Coffee" and "Turkish Coffee"? Or are they different terms for the same coffee? (depending upon which country you like better?)

On this forum, it's only Greek Coffee, not Tu%&!$h.
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Offline Heorhij

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2009, 01:04:15 PM »
Okay folks, another Greek coffee question:

Is there a substantive difference between "Greek Coffee" and "Turkish Coffee"? Or are they different terms for the same coffee? (depending upon which country you like better?)

 ???

In Ukraine, both are known as "Armenian Coffee."  :o
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Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2009, 01:20:19 PM »
I simply call it 'delicious'.  :)
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Offline Salpy

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2009, 09:03:52 PM »
In Ukraine, both are known as "Armenian Coffee."  :o

That's what the Armenians call it.   :)

Offline Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2009, 09:21:45 PM »
Well, we all live and learn. According to a Wiki entry, there is a difference in the two, with the Turkish beans being darker and stronger in flavor than the Greek version. In any case, the word coffee with all of its variants is Arabic in origin. The brew was also first made by Arabs. It got to be called Turkish coffee over the Ottoman centuries, but in the wake of the Turkish invasion of Cyprus, there came to be also Green and Cypriot coffees. In the Balkans, by the way, the Serbs just call it coffee. In the Middle east, there is Arabic and Levantine coffee, while there are also Armenian and Macedonian coffees.

Offline Eugenio

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2009, 10:17:33 PM »
I went to a Middle Eastern grocery store, and picked up some ground coffee. Only later did I realize that it was heavily flavored with cardamom. It was...jarring to an American palate.  :P

How common is it in these countries to put cardamom in your coffee?

Offline Heorhij

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #11 on: August 27, 2009, 10:27:06 PM »
In Ukraine, both are known as "Armenian Coffee."  :o

That's what the Armenians call it.   :)

Great. My suspicions turned out to be true.:)

Seriously, in Ukraine, especially in her western part, people love this... whatever it is... Armenian or... according to the OC.net consensus, Armenian, ... coffee. In L'viv, there is a street, called Virmens'ka Vulytsya ("the Armenian Street"), where, according to the local legend, Armenians taught Ukrainians how to brew coffee in the 16th century. This street, all of it, smells like the best coffee in the entire universe. Every single building on this street has at least one, sometimes more than one, coffee house on its ground floor. The cooks in these coffee houses put ground coffee in copper "jeswas," cover it with cold water, stir, and put these "jeswas" on hot sand. The point is to watch the coffee so that it does not boil quite over, and yet still boils. If this is what the customer wants, the cooks may also put sugar into the gound coffee, mixing it with the ground beans.
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Offline ozgeorge

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #12 on: August 27, 2009, 10:36:28 PM »
I went to a Middle Eastern grocery store, and picked up some ground coffee. Only later did I realize that it was heavily flavored with cardamom. It was...jarring to an American palate.  :P

How common is it in these countries to put cardamom in your coffee?

Its a common practice in Turkey to put cardamom in coffee. I actually quite like it though!
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Offline Nazarene

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #13 on: August 30, 2009, 12:28:52 PM »
This type of coffee is drunk by Greeks, Cypriots, Turks, Arabs, Armenians, Assyrians, Israeilis, Persians and the Balkan peoples (did I leave anyone out?). Don't know which one of these cultures invented it, my guess is either the Arabs or Assyrians. Perhaps we should just call it "Middle Eastern coffee".

As far as I know only the Arabs and Turks drink it with cardamom, and I prefer to drink it like this. The Yemenis drink it with ginger, which is also delicious.

Offline rwprof

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #14 on: August 30, 2009, 01:35:44 PM »
Is sdcheung around?  ;) ....no difference.


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Offline Margaret S.

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2009, 05:38:31 AM »
According to a Turkish (sorry  ;)) proverb coffee should be, as "black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love."  My Coptic friend introduced me to cardamom coffee and now I am addicted, I can't drink my Greek/Turkish coffee any other way.  She added a mixture sent over by her mother but I have run out of what she gave me and now just buy it with cardamom added.

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Margaret
in Edinburgh

Offline Nazarene

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2009, 01:24:51 PM »
According to a Turkish (sorry  ;)) proverb coffee should be, as "black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love."  My Coptic friend introduced me to cardamom coffee and now I am addicted, I can't drink my Greek/Turkish coffee any other way.  She added a mixture sent over by her mother but I have run out of what she gave me and now just buy it with cardamom added.

Regards
Margaret
in Edinburgh

If you like it with cardamom then try it with ginger next time, Yemeni style: http://www.arabicnews.com/recipes/Ginger_Coffee.html.

Offline Apostolos

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #17 on: September 04, 2009, 01:58:44 PM »
No substantive difference. The competing national provenances are similar to Baklava (neither Turkish or Greek) and Moussaka (more than likely created by a Greek cook working as a cook for a Turkish big shot).
Actually Turkish Baklava is made mostly with pistachio while the Greek one is made with nuts only.
The main differences are:
GB=>Phyllo dough layers of pastry, chopped nuts, extra virgin olive oil and melted butter, honey and sugar for the syrup, cinnamon powder and clove
TB=>Paper-thin layers of pastry, chopped pistachio, melted butter, just sugar for the syrup, cinnamon bark and clove


« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 01:59:57 PM by Apostolos »
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Offline GammaRay

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #18 on: September 06, 2009, 06:29:45 PM »
It's a Greek coffee! We came up with this, no doubt about it! >:(

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Offline Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)

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Re: Greek vs. Turkish coffee?
« Reply #19 on: September 06, 2009, 07:17:54 PM »
No substantive difference. The competing national provenances are similar to Baklava (neither Turkish or Greek) and Moussaka (more than likely created by a Greek cook working as a cook for a Turkish big shot).
Actually Turkish Baklava is made mostly with pistachio while the Greek one is made with nuts only.
The main differences are:
GB=>Phyllo dough layers of pastry, chopped nuts, extra virgin olive oil and melted butter, honey and sugar for the syrup, cinnamon powder and clove
TB=>Paper-thin layers of pastry, chopped pistachio, melted butter, just sugar for the syrup, cinnamon bark and clove


I make it with Phyllo, melted and clarified butter, chopped walnuts mixed with granulated sugar and a little cinnamon, and for the syrup--sugar, water, juice of one lemon and some honey. I guess my version does not really fit either Turkish or Greek genres.

I suspect that just like Turkish coffee, the provenance for baklava is Arabic. On the other hand, there is no disputing that Greek or Turkish baklava is better than any Arabic versions that I tasted. Regarding mousaka, there are two versions that I have encountered. One is the classic Constantinople, Greek "palace" variety with cinnamon added to the meat and the bechamel sauce (very refined!--approaching French haut cuisine). The other is more rustic with the meat sauce having somewhat of a Southern  Italian flavor (parsley and oregano being the main herbs) and no bechamel sauce. The latter one is delicious served with some thick yogurt over it.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2009, 07:27:00 PM by Second Chance »