Author Topic: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments  (Read 295 times)

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Offline ElisabethConvent

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Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« on: August 26, 2015, 04:47:13 AM »
On the origins of Orthodox Vestment:

http://catalogueofstelisabethconvent.blogspot.com/2015/08/from-history-of-vestments.html

A Holy Fulfillment: The Old Testament and the Adornment of the Church
From "THE HISTORY OF VESTMENTS"


   Any discussion of the theological importance of liturgical vesture within the Church is not complete without considering the place of the Old Testament Scriptures that specifically refer to garments used in Levitical worship. The primary scriptural references to the priestly garments of the old covenant are found in Exodus 25-36, in which God gives explicit instructions to the Prophet Moses for the outfitting ofthe Tabernacle as well as the garments to be worn by the priests. Indeed, these instructions read like technical notes, with emphasis given to how things are to be made: "The hem shall be interwoven with the rest, to prevent ripping" (Ex 28.27); what they are to be made from: "Gold, silver, and bronze; blue, purple, and scarlet cloth; fine spun linen, and female goats' hair, ram skins dyed red and skins dyed blue, and incorruptible wood; oil for the light, and incense for anointing oil and for composition ofincense; sardius stones, and stones for the carved work of the breastplate and the full- length robe" (Ex 25.3-7); and who is to make them: "Now Bezalel and Aholiab, and every gifted artisan in whom the Lord put wisdom and knowledge to know how to do all manner of work for the service of the holy place, did according to all the Lord commanded" (Ex 36.1).


Offline wgw

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2015, 09:23:41 AM »
There is a book on the history of Byzantine Rite, that is to say, Eastern Orthodox vestments, entitled Garments of Salvation, which Imwould like to get.  Much of it applies to the Oriental Orthodox as well, and to the Maronites, all of whom use vestments that appear to share a common pedigree with contemporary Byzantine Rite vestments.  But this is also true of traditional Ambrosian and Mozarabic Rite vestments, and even, I would argue, Roman Rite vestments.  Vestments are somewhat of a continuum, which is why for example even in the relatively low church UMC in which I was raised, the ministers wore albs and stoles.  And the black Geneva gown with preaching tabs is a clear relative of the cassock, even if it was initially used in opposition to it; some traditional European Protestant churches in the reformed tradition use elaborate embroidered preaching tabs that are quite exquisite.  For example, the Hungarian Reformed Church.

There are two liturgical traditions where I wish I had more information on the classes and types of vestments historically used: the Ethiopian and East Syriac Rites.  Modern East Syriac parishes tend to use a standard pattern od diaconal stoles, usually yellow stoles with red crosses, worn in the same patterns as West Syriac subdeacons and deacons.  The clergy usually seem to wear Roman style copes when officiating.  But out of the church, they wear a distinctive fez encircled with bands of gauze, the kossita or shashta.  There is a similiar hat historically worn by Chaldean Patriarchs of Babylon called the Shash, which lamentably the current Patriarch has iconoclastically said he no longer intends to wear.  Now a book I have, published by the Anglican Foreign Missions Society  either during or just before the Genocide, on the Assyrian church, indicates that at the time the Assyrian church was receiving donations of beautiful, colorful, fine silk and linen vestments from the guilds of high church Anglican ladies who loved making those things, in that era, and that prior to that their vesture had been very modest owing to their impoverished state.  But I would still like to know what it was.

I have a number of other vestment related questions.  For example, in the Russian church, is there any distinction or difference in meaning between the maroon and violet caps worn by priests (klobuks, I think theyre called?).  Can a priest wear the same sticheron with different vestment sets?  (I would assume so, whereas on the other hand wearing a blue epitrachelion with a gold phayno would not be done). 

And in the Coptic church, why do priests tend not to wear copes or anything like the Phayno?  Bishops do wear these, and in the Coptic Catholic church, I have seen photos of their priests with standard Coptic copes, but I havent seen Coptic Orthodox priests wearing a cope. 
Antisemitism, racism and prejudicial nationalism should have no place in Orthodoxy.  For to paraphrase  St. Paul, there is neither Jew nor Greek, neither male nor female, slave or freeman, in the Christian Church.

Offline ElisabethConvent

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #2 on: August 26, 2015, 09:52:00 AM »

I have a number of other vestment related questions.  For example, in the Russian church, is there any distinction or difference in meaning between the maroon and violet caps worn by priests (klobuks, I think theyre called?).  Can a priest wear the same sticheron with different vestment sets?  (I would assume so, whereas on the other hand wearing a blue epitrachelion with a gold phayno would not be done). 


Regarding the maroon or violet there is no specific destinction. However they are called Kamilavkion in greek καμιλαύκιον and in the Russian church are presented to deacons and priests of white (non monastic clergy as awards, which can be worn by then during services of official events) this is different in comparison to the Klobuks which are intended for monastics and are black along with a black veil(whith the expection of the white klobuk worn by Metropolitans). Generally the priests do wear the same sticharion(podriznik) since they are commonly in plain white color.

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #3 on: August 26, 2015, 10:06:03 AM »

I have a number of other vestment related questions.  For example, in the Russian church, is there any distinction or difference in meaning between the maroon and violet caps worn by priests (klobuks, I think theyre called?).  Can a priest wear the same sticheron with different vestment sets?  (I would assume so, whereas on the other hand wearing a blue epitrachelion with a gold phayno would not be done). 


Regarding the maroon or violet there is no specific destinction. However they are called Kamilavkion in greek καμιλαύκιον and in the Russian church are presented to deacons and priests of white (non monastic clergy as awards, which can be worn by then during services of official events) this is different in comparison to the Klobuks which are intended for monastics and are black along with a black veil(whith the expection of the white klobuk worn by Metropolitans). Generally the priests do wear the same sticharion(podriznik) since they are commonly in plain white color.

Interesting. Welcome to the forum, EC. Are you actually a member of the convent? I like the convent choir's recordings.

Offline ElisabethConvent

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2015, 10:17:28 AM »

I have a number of other vestment related questions.  For example, in the Russian church, is there any distinction or difference in meaning between the maroon and violet caps worn by priests (klobuks, I think theyre called?).  Can a priest wear the same sticheron with different vestment sets?  (I would assume so, whereas on the other hand wearing a blue epitrachelion with a gold phayno would not be done). 


Regarding the maroon or violet there is no specific destinction. However they are called Kamilavkion in greek καμιλαύκιον and in the Russian church are presented to deacons and priests of white (non monastic clergy as awards, which can be worn by then during services of official events) this is different in comparison to the Klobuks which are intended for monastics and are black along with a black veil(whith the expection of the white klobuk worn by Metropolitans). Generally the priests do wear the same sticharion(podriznik) since they are commonly in plain white color.

Interesting. Welcome to the forum, EC. Are you actually a member of the convent? I like the convent choir's recordings.

not a monastic member but help at the convent, most recently with a blog for the catalog of the convent

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2015, 11:06:50 AM »
Hello, EC. Welcome to the site. :)

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2015, 11:15:34 AM »
Welcome to the forum, ElizabethConvent!

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #7 on: August 26, 2015, 01:22:46 PM »

I have a number of other vestment related questions.  For example, in the Russian church, is there any distinction or difference in meaning between the maroon and violet caps worn by priests (klobuks, I think theyre called?).  Can a priest wear the same sticheron with different vestment sets?  (I would assume so, whereas on the other hand wearing a blue epitrachelion with a gold phayno would not be done). 


Regarding the maroon or violet there is no specific destinction. However they are called Kamilavkion in greek καμιλαύκιον and in the Russian church are presented to deacons and priests of white (non monastic clergy as awards, which can be worn by then during services of official events) this is different in comparison to the Klobuks which are intended for monastics and are black along with a black veil(whith the expection of the white klobuk worn by Metropolitans). Generally the priests do wear the same sticharion(podriznik) since they are commonly in plain white color.

So is there a standard Kamilavkion that all priests wear, like the "Stovepipe Hat" worn by Greek clergy?
Antisemitism, racism and prejudicial nationalism should have no place in Orthodoxy.  For to paraphrase  St. Paul, there is neither Jew nor Greek, neither male nor female, slave or freeman, in the Christian Church.

Offline ElisabethConvent

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2015, 04:35:24 AM »

I have a number of other vestment related questions.  For example, in the Russian church, is there any distinction or difference in meaning between the maroon and violet caps worn by priests (klobuks, I think theyre called?).  Can a priest wear the same sticheron with different vestment sets?  (I would assume so, whereas on the other hand wearing a blue epitrachelion with a gold phayno would not be done). 


Regarding the maroon or violet there is no specific destinction. However they are called Kamilavkion in greek καμιλαύκιον and in the Russian church are presented to deacons and priests of white (non monastic clergy as awards, which can be worn by then during services of official events) this is different in comparison to the Klobuks which are intended for monastics and are black along with a black veil(whith the expection of the white klobuk worn by Metropolitans). Generally the priests do wear the same sticharion(podriznik) since they are commonly in plain white color.

So is there a standard Kamilavkion that all priests wear, like the "Stovepipe Hat" worn by Greek clergy?

It would be hard to say about a certain standard. But the Kamilavkion would be only for priests (non monastic) who recieve it as an award. The standard for monastics is the black Klobuk with a veil. Also interesting that hierodeacons wear a black klobuk without a veil while serving but at all othertimes will wear the typical black veiled klobuk.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2015, 04:35:53 AM by ElisabethConvent »

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2015, 02:32:33 PM »
So what headgear do newly ordained priests wear?
Antisemitism, racism and prejudicial nationalism should have no place in Orthodoxy.  For to paraphrase  St. Paul, there is neither Jew nor Greek, neither male nor female, slave or freeman, in the Christian Church.

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Re: Origins of Orthodox Vestments From the History of Vestments
« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 01:49:39 AM »
So what headgear do newly ordained priests wear?

None, liturgically.
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