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Poll
Question: How much do you charge for a (Greek) Coffee at your festival?
<$1.00/We just give it away - 2 (18.2%)
$1.00 - 2 (18.2%)
$1.50 - 0 (0%)
$2.00 - 3 (27.3%)
$2.50 - 2 (18.2%)
$3.00 - 1 (9.1%)
>$3.00/we extort the customer - 0 (0%)
N/A / 42 / I like voting in polls - 1 (9.1%)
Total Voters: 11

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Author Topic: Greek coffee at your Festival  (Read 1863 times) Average Rating: 0
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Elisha
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« on: August 07, 2009, 02:34:49 AM »

Please vote.  I've been charging only $1.00 (1 token) in my booth (I've been managing it) the past few years and I think I've been way underpriced.  Please vote.  Thanks.
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« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2009, 11:15:02 AM »

I don't believe we offered Greek coffee out our first annual festival last year.  How much did you pay per pound?
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« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2009, 11:45:43 AM »

How big of a cup do you give them?  I know plenty of festivals where they give a fairly sized cup of the coffee to the person.  But if you give the small cups, you should definitely be charging more than $1. 

Also, how much business do you get?  If you get a lot of people, then it might work out, but if you get a few people...it might not even be worth doing...just curious. 
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« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2009, 01:04:56 PM »

Sell it for $2. No doubt about it. People won't bat an eye.
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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2009, 02:13:42 PM »

I paid $2 for a 3 oz. cup at a recent Festival.

Some larger Churches charge $1 or $1.50.  I haven't seen prices go past $2, yet.
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Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)
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« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2009, 02:39:05 PM »

It would depend on what you sell as "Greek" coffee. 

If you prepare it the traditional way in a one or two serving cezve, over glowing charcaol, and with ice water (to help make the foam)--you should charge at least $5.

If you mass produce in larger cezves and over a stove, $2.

If you serve esspresso and call it real "Greek" Coffee, shame on you!
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« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2009, 10:53:29 AM »

This is a helpful thread, as our parish just began a Greek festival last year, and we are strongly considering adding Greek coffee this year.
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« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2009, 01:47:27 PM »

Serbs drink the heavy turkish coffee,i thought the greeks did as well....or is trukish coffee called Greek coffee now just curious...
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« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2009, 02:47:07 PM »

Serbs drink the heavy turkish coffee,i thought the greeks did as well....or is trukish coffee called Greek coffee now just curious...


IT'S CALLED GREEK COFFEE!!    lol.  and even in america we call it serbian coffee (aka. "nasa kafa" наша кафа) as opposed to american coffee. 
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« Reply #9 on: August 10, 2009, 03:23:15 AM »

We use the two-serving size briki's made of copper - you can buy them from Cost Plus.  I have one at home too, but use a small metal one (aluminum?) for one serving myself at home.  I forget the brand of coffee we buy, but it is GREEK style - NOT Turkish.  We just grab water from I think a large coffee maker (to keep it warm)...or from a 5 gal water bottle.  We cook it over a flame on a propane tank powered stove (two burners).  We have been charging $1 for years (just had our 20th year last year) and usually sell about 6 1 lb bags worth (however many cups that makes).  It comes out to about a 4oz serving in those small styrofoam cups.

Greek style coffee has chicory in it, is a lighter roast and I'm told by our old Macedonian, that ground garbanzos actually are added to help lighten it.  Turkish styles have a darker roast and cardamom is usually added to the blend, which can make it taste almost medicine-like in my opinion if you're not used to it.  I've tried Egyptian and an "African" style (half chocolate, no sugar and double amounts of grounds due to the chocolate) and berber blends (coriander) as well.  I remember reading somewhere that Greek grounds are actually finer than Turkish historically, as the Greeks, being subject to the Turks, would get the leftover grounds ("dust") from the mill to make their coffee.  I don't have any backup to this though. 

I think it is too cheap and think we should raise it to $2 (as the booth head, I have already decreed it - I just want confirmation of the appropriateness).  Our parish is OCA, been around over 70 years, but very international in nature.  Our booths are usually:  outside bakery (togo), crafts, Russian (piroshki & borscht), greek style sliced lamb and rice (w/ greek salad and or bread), spanikopita and tiropita, gyros, Eritrean, Kebabs, Mediterrean (falafels - usually tabouleh, but I guess they say it is too much work this year), Serbian (green beans, sarma and potato salad), coffee (my booth), ice cream & soda, wine and beer (two different booths).  Lotsa other stuff to do, but just listing the food booths.

For you other experienced festival veterans, let me know what you think price-wise.

See the link below for photos from two years ago.

http://www.saintseraphim.com/photos/?page=glendi2007
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« Reply #10 on: August 10, 2009, 11:07:17 AM »

Serbs drink the heavy turkish coffee,i thought the greeks did as well....or is trukish coffee called Greek coffee now just curious...


IT'S CALLED GREEK COFFEE!!    lol.  and even in america we call it serbian coffee (aka. "nasa kafa" наша кафа) as opposed to american coffee. 

Zdravo...When i was younger Dad Mom and i and  my brother we would Go to the bishops house ,the door was always open to visitors,the late Bishop Dionisija would ask dad and mom if they wanted tursku kaffu the cook would prepare in a small pot and pour it in small cups,i never heard of serbian coffee or they never called it that at that time...so hence my confusion....
Don't we use the turkish word sarma for stuffed cabbage [punjeni kupus]and the word [corba for soup] [chi for tea.]
and they became our words....
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« Reply #11 on: August 10, 2009, 11:18:27 AM »

Serbs drink the heavy turkish coffee,i thought the greeks did as well....or is trukish coffee called Greek coffee now just curious...


IT'S CALLED GREEK COFFEE!!    lol.  and even in america we call it serbian coffee (aka. "nasa kafa" наша кафа) as opposed to american coffee. 

Zdravo...When i was younger Dad Mom and i and  my brother we would Go to the bishops house ,the door was always open to visitors,the late Bishop Dionisija would ask dad and mom if they wanted tursku kaffu the cook would prepare in a small pot and pour it in small cups,i never heard of serbian coffee or they never called it that at that time...so hence my confusion....
Don't we use the turkish word sarma for stuffed cabbage [punjeni kupus]and the word [corba for soup] [chi for tea.]
and they became our words....


prijatno, oh I don't disagree with you, and in fact my relatives in serbia call it "turska kafa" all the time!  I've also heard it (though) called "nasa kafa" as opposed to american coffee - filtered coffee.  That's all I was trying to say.  sorry for any confusion! 
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« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2009, 09:41:11 AM »

*bump*

C'mon guys.  I should be able to get more responses than this.
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Carl Kraeff (Second Chance)
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« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2009, 12:01:25 PM »

Elisha,

Y'all have a beautiful church in the making; I love the fresco work that you have been doing. May the Lord bless y'all and all who come to your parish community.

As for coffee, aside from nationalistic concerns, there is only one proper way to sonsider your coffee and that is "Turkish coffee". It was started in Constantinople under the Ottomans, is probably of Arabic origin, but refers to the way that is made--not the kind of beans that you use or any additions you may make. Addition of any fillers is strictly a local or personal variation and addition of flavoring agents like cardamom or chocolate makes the product something different than simple Turkish coffee.

As you know there are two main objectives: first, maximize the production of the top foam and preserve as much of it as possible (boiling breaks up the foam) and second, extract as much of the flavor from the coffee as possible (quick=weak). Turkish coffee uses the finest possible grind as the beans must be almost pulverized so that the particles settle down in layer much like mud and not cut grass. You should add sugar (if desired) to the water before you put in the coffee as this will increase the boiling point. You should also use a gentle source of heat (again to preclude boiling too fast). Finally, dropping a few drops into the mixture just before it boils prolongs the steeping time and makes more of the beautifully creamy top foam.

Since this is so time consuming, I think that you should charge $5, but it may drive the customers away, particularly when the customers do not really know the final points about Turkish coffee. So, may be going to $2 from $1 would be the best you can do for know. I would, however, put up a sign to the effect that each coffee serving is hand crafted--artisanal coffee, so to speak. As for what you call it, changing the name to Turkish coffee could be part of you justification for doubling the price but if your Greek parishioners balk (and I assure you that I don't blame them), keep the name but really emphasize the artisanal aspect. Good luck and God bless!
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« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2009, 12:28:32 PM »

I think you have your basic answer: It's obvious that you should charge more than $1.

Charging $2 is a natural step, since it is still a low price point -- low enough that people can buy on a whim -- and any decrease in volume of sales will easily be recovered by the increased profit margin.

Going above $2 requires intentional, well-thought-out marketing. For that, you'd need to assess your signage and the presentation of your booth, as well as the personal characteristics/salesmanship of your vendors. If you have someone on staff who has a big personality and strong sales skills, then a higher price point could work out well.
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« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2009, 01:06:54 PM »

You can chart out a long-term plan to raise to something in the neighborhood of 2.50 or 3.  But 2 sounds like a great point for this year (and the next 2-3).
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« Reply #16 on: August 19, 2009, 11:55:32 PM »

Thanks, guys.  I thought I would have more responses to my informal poll, but I feel reassured of my raise to $2.  I think my 100% price increase won't cause a corresponding 50% business drop.  I seriously doubt raising it over $2 would be considered in the near future.

Second Chance, thanks on my church building.  Our frescoes rock.  You don't need to tell me how to make it - I make one for myself everyday before work.  Also, I think the debate can be had ad infinitum.  I remember reading somewhere, as I mentioned above, that Greek Coffee historically took the dust from the wheel from what was left after the Turks took theirs (i.e. it was even finer).  It really is so much lighter than the more "Turkish" blends though, I'm told due to both a lighter roast and adding some ground garbanzos.  The chicory flavoring really makes it a lot different too.  I will continue to use our Greek roast no matter how many ask if a) it is like Turkish coffee, b) I have Turkish coffee or c) is it the same as Turkish coffee?  No one in my parish has recent decendants from Asia Minor, so that settles it.
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