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Author Topic: Paschal Liturgy Gospel reading  (Read 5298 times) Average Rating: 0
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mike
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« on: May 10, 2009, 08:16:06 AM »

In my Parish it looked like that:
the three Presbyters and a Deacon read the Gospel divided on 4 parts in 4 different languages (Belarusian, Ukrainian, Polish and Russian) and then the Deacon read the whole fragment in the language we normally use (Church Slavonic) again.


Here go my questions:
- Is it in your Parishes read in similar way or it's read whole in each language?
- Can it be read only be ordained Priests? I've heard that in some Parishes it's read by lay people (both male or female) and it made me curious.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 08:16:19 AM by mike » Logged
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2009, 02:03:31 PM »

In my Parish it looked like that:
the three Presbyters and a Deacon read the Gospel divided on 4 parts in 4 different languages (Belarusian, Ukrainian, Polish and Russian) and then the Deacon read the whole fragment in the language we normally use (Church Slavonic) again.


Here go my questions:
- Is it in your Parishes read in similar way or it's read whole in each language?
- Can it be read only be ordained Priests? I've heard that in some Parishes it's read by lay people (both male or female) and it made me curious.

Such practice(read the paschal gospel in"all languages" exist both in current russian and greek church.Russians do it in the Pascha night's liturgy,but greeks in the vespers of Agape.

No any typikon or real tradition call for it.In fact it's a innovation——unknown in most greek parishes till second world war.

Today in many parishes(both russsian and greek) allow layman read gospel in this case——this is non-canonical: in the church ,diakonos is the lowest level of ierosyne who can proclaim ieron and agion euangelion liturgically.
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2009, 02:29:37 PM »

In my Parish it looked like that:
the three Presbyters and a Deacon read the Gospel divided on 4 parts in 4 different languages (Belarusian, Ukrainian, Polish and Russian) and then the Deacon read the whole fragment in the language we normally use (Church Slavonic) again.


Here go my questions:
- Is it in your Parishes read in similar way or it's read whole in each language?
- Can it be read only be ordained Priests? I've heard that in some Parishes it's read by lay people (both male or female) and it made me curious.

Such practice(read the paschal gospel in"all languages" exist both in current russian and greek church.Russians do it in the Pascha night's liturgy,but greeks in the vespers of Agape.

No any typikon or real tradition call for it.In fact it's a innovation——unknown in most greek parishes till second world war.

Today in many parishes(both russsian and greek) allow layman read gospel in this case——this is non-canonical: in the church ,diakonos is the lowest level of ierosyne who can proclaim ieron and agion euangelion liturgically.

Easter Sunday 2004, I attended Easter Sunday Vespers (aka Agape Service) at a Church in VA where the Gospel was read in French, Spanish & Arabic besides Greek & English.  Is reading the Resurrection in multiple languages "non-canonical" when a layperson reads the Gospel only once a year?   Huh  The lay people were spread out throughout the Church - no one was even close to the Altar and involved men and women ...  Shocked
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2009, 02:41:18 PM »

Is reading the Resurrection in multiple languages "non-canonical" when a layperson reads the Gospel only once a year?
Could layman have "chance"to serve liturgy "once a year"?
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2009, 02:48:13 PM »

Is reading the Resurrection in multiple languages "non-canonical" when a layperson reads the Gospel only once a year?
Could layman have "chance"to serve liturgy "once a year"?

They are not serving the "liturgy"; They are reading the Gospel, during a Vespers service, in different languages at locations nowhere near the altar.   Smiley  Consider this excerpt from a 2003 Ukrainian Orthodox League Newsletter:

Quote
The Gospel reading shows how soon after the Resurrection Jesus appeared and
was present with those whom He loved, giving them gifts as well. This Gospel is
traditionally read in as many languages as is feasible. Here is the wonder! The
Gospel is sent to all the peoples of the world, and we have been charged to facilitate
this command. On Pascha, we come out of our ethnic cocoon and profess that the
Gospel is destined for all and we should come to realize that we are EXPECTED to
do our share towards this goal.
In some parishes we also find the paschal greetings in many languages. It becomes
like a game, but the serious message is there. Take my words of LIFE to the
whole world.
The paschal Stichera are sung which reaffirm the triumph of God over His enemies.
Although, in this age, it may seem that the evil one and his minions have the
upper hand, we know with certainty (as does Satan) that ultimately the Lord is victor.
The end of this service, reflecting the Lord’s ultimate triumph and the fact that
in the joy of the resurrection we cannot continue in enmity, affirms that we should
forgive even those who hate us.

« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 02:58:39 PM by SolEX01 » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2009, 03:00:49 PM »

Is reading the Resurrection in multiple languages "non-canonical" when a layperson reads the Gospel only once a year?
Could layman have "chance"to serve liturgy "once a year"?
They are not serving the "liturgy"; They are reading the Gospel, during a Vespers service, in different languages at locations nowhere near the altar.   Smiley

Ok,it's a bad ensample.
Layperson cannot serve liturgy in any case,but can read Gospel in a reader-service by oikonomia(reader service is oikonomia by itself ).
Reading Gospel by layperson during liturgical service when clergy is available is non-canonical.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 03:19:46 PM by Elpidophoros » Logged
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« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2009, 03:07:39 PM »

Ok,it's a bad ensample.
Layperson cannot serve liturgy in any case,but can read Gospel in a reader-service by oikonomia(rader service is oikonomia by itself ).

The Priest reads the Gospel during the Agape Vespers service; The Resurrection is announced to all the world in his/her own language.  The Agape Vespers symbolize that; hence, the Church says it is OK for lay persons on only Easter Sunday to read the Gospel in different languages.   Smiley

Reading Gospel during liturgical service when clergy is available is non-canonical.

No argument from me.   Smiley

In Christ,
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« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 03:12:21 PM by SolEX01 » Logged
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« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2009, 03:10:09 PM »

the Church says it is OK for lay persons on only Easter Sunday to read the Gospel in different languages.   
"The Church"says that or "some persons in church"say that? Lips Sealed
« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 03:17:04 PM by Elpidophoros » Logged
mike
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« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2009, 03:22:40 PM »

They are not serving the "liturgy"; They are reading the Gospel, during a Vespers service, in different languages at locations nowhere near the altar.   Smiley  Consider this excerpt from a 2003 Ukrainian Orthodox League Newsletter:

I mean Liturgy Gospel (John: 1, 1-17). So Greeks read in different languages Paschal Vespers' Gospel? It's not as strange as organs Smiley
« Last Edit: May 10, 2009, 03:34:37 PM by mike » Logged
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« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2009, 07:16:42 PM »

In my Parish it looked like that:
the three Presbyters and a Deacon read the Gospel divided on 4 parts in 4 different languages (Belarusian, Ukrainian, Polish and Russian) and then the Deacon read the whole fragment in the language we normally use (Church Slavonic) again.


Here go my questions:
- Is it in your Parishes read in similar way or it's read whole in each language?
- Can it be read only be ordained Priests? I've heard that in some Parishes it's read by lay people (both male or female) and it made me curious.

I myself read (Paschal Liturgy) 5 different sets of verse in 5 different languages.  Then I read the whole reading in English.  In some places I have seen it that the Epistle is also read in multiple languages (by laity), and the Gospel in several languages (by clergy). 
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« Reply #10 on: May 10, 2009, 07:18:49 PM »

Incidentally, if I had laity that wished to read in other languages the epistle, I would certainly allow it. 
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« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2009, 07:20:16 PM »

Also, I heard from a person who was in Jerusalem for Pascha, that the Gospel is read in many languages both for Liturgy at night and for Vespers the next day.  Has anyone else experience this or have knowledge of this? 
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« Reply #12 on: May 10, 2009, 07:56:38 PM »

Is reading the Resurrection in multiple languages "non-canonical" when a layperson reads the Gospel only once a year?
Could layman have "chance"to serve liturgy "once a year"?


Sure, innovative priests everywhere have elevated the laity to deacons during the epeclesis, why not more innovation? 
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« Reply #13 on: May 10, 2009, 08:49:55 PM »

the Church says it is OK for lay persons on only Easter Sunday to read the Gospel in different languages.   
"The Church"says that or "some persons in church"say that? Lips Sealed

We are "The Church."

What's wrong with a lay person proclaiming the Good News of the Resurrection to the World on the day of the Resurrection?   angel

When Jesus gave the Great Commission to His Disciples, He didn't tell them to ensure that only ordained clergy read the Gospel at all times.   Wink  If I read the Gospel on public transportation, am I breaking Canon Law?   Wink
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« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2009, 08:50:58 PM »

Is reading the Resurrection in multiple languages "non-canonical" when a layperson reads the Gospel only once a year?
Could layman have "chance"to serve liturgy "once a year"?


Sure, innovative priests everywhere have elevated the laity to deacons during the epeclesis, why not more innovation? 

Did they have enough vestments for all these newly ordained deacons and deaconesses?   Cheesy  Wink  Cheesy
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« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2009, 08:56:09 PM »

Is reading the Resurrection in multiple languages "non-canonical" when a layperson reads the Gospel only once a year?
Could layman have "chance"to serve liturgy "once a year"?


Sure, innovative priests everywhere have elevated the laity to deacons during the epeclesis, why not more innovation? 

Did they have enough vestments for all these newly ordained deacons and deaconesses?   Cheesy  Wink  Cheesy

Did you actually understand the meaning behind what I wrote?
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« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2009, 08:59:34 PM »

Sure, innovative priests everywhere have elevated the laity to deacons during the epeclesis, why not more innovation? 

Did they have enough vestments for all these newly ordained deacons and deaconesses?   Cheesy  Wink  Cheesy

Did you actually understand the meaning behind what I wrote?

I assumed a literal interpretation; hence, the humorous remarks about vestments.  If there was a deeper meaning then I apologize for not grasping it.  Please clarify.   Smiley
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« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2009, 10:22:21 PM »

I'll get to it here in a bit...
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« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2009, 01:56:41 AM »

The tradition in my parish for the Paschal gospel is thus:

The priest and deacon "set up" the reading like normal. "Wisdom! Let us attend! Let us listen to the Holy Gospel! Blah Blah Blah...The Reading from the Gospel according to St. John the Theologian."

Parishoners then take turns reading the lesson in various languages. My priest tries to get as many as possible. "If you've got a different language in which to read, do it." I've been doing it the past few years in French. Once the last foreign language is presented, the deacon continues the service as normal, with the reading in English.

Pascha is a worldwide celebration and feast day, so it's cool to do it this way.
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« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2010, 12:56:38 PM »

This year: partly in Podlachian, Belarusian, Russian, Ukrainian, Polish and French and then whole in Church Slavonic once more.
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« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2010, 01:30:45 PM »

The Reading from the Gospel according to St. John the Theologian.
We simply say "according to John" without "St." either "the Theologian" Undecided
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« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2010, 02:09:55 PM »

I remember that in 2006 we had the Gospel reading of the Paschal liturgy (John 20:19-23) in several languages (English, Romanian, Italian, Russian....), after which the priest read the same passage in Greek.

We have not had a Paschal liturgy (Paschal Vespers said in the morning) in our small Church since then.
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« Reply #22 on: April 04, 2010, 02:19:47 PM »

We had the Gospel read in Greek, Urdu, Amharic, Russian, Serbian, Romanian, Japanese, German, French, Spanish, and Latin then the deacon proclaimed the Gospel in English


Christ is Risen!!!
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« Reply #23 on: April 04, 2010, 08:54:00 PM »

We follow the standard weekly protocal which is to have the Gospel first proclaimed in Ukrainian then in English.

Boring, I know, but that's how we do things in my parish.  Cheesy  Tongue

Also, we limit the exclamations of "Christ is risen! Indeed He is risen!" to Ukrainian, English, and Greek. Anytime the priest has tried to throw in other languages, it just confuses the people. Some of them even scratch their heads at the Greek.  laugh
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« Reply #24 on: April 04, 2010, 11:00:11 PM »

Is reading the Resurrection in multiple languages "non-canonical" when a layperson reads the Gospel only once a year?
Could layman have "chance"to serve liturgy "once a year"?
They are not serving the "liturgy"; They are reading the Gospel, during a Vespers service, in different languages at locations nowhere near the altar.   Smiley

Ok,it's a bad ensample.
Layperson cannot serve liturgy in any case,but can read Gospel in a reader-service by oikonomia(reader service is oikonomia by itself ).
Reading Gospel by layperson during liturgical service when clergy is available is non-canonical.

Christ is risen!

What about clergy who can't read the languages in question?
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« Reply #25 on: April 04, 2010, 11:03:56 PM »

Christ is risen!
In my Parish it looked like that:
the three Presbyters and a Deacon read the Gospel divided on 4 parts in 4 different languages (Belarusian, Ukrainian, Polish and Russian) and then the Deacon read the whole fragment in the language we normally use (Church Slavonic) again.


Here go my questions:
- Is it in your Parishes read in similar way or it's read whole in each language?
- Can it be read only be ordained Priests? I've heard that in some Parishes it's read by lay people (both male or female) and it made me curious.

Such practice(read the paschal gospel in"all languages" exist both in current russian and greek church.Russians do it in the Pascha night's liturgy,but greeks in the vespers of Agape.

No any typikon or real tradition call for it.In fact it's a innovation——unknown in most greek parishes till second world war.

Tradition: the living Faith of the dead.

Traditionalism: the dead faith of the living.


Quote
Today in many parishes(both russsian and greek) allow layman read gospel in this case——this is non-canonical: in the church ,diakonos is the lowest level of ierosyne who can proclaim ieron and agion euangelion liturgically.

How about the deacons and the Holy Gospel? Wink
« Last Edit: April 04, 2010, 11:07:07 PM by ialmisry » Logged

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« Reply #26 on: April 05, 2010, 12:25:43 PM »


Tradition: the living Faith of the dead.

Traditionalism: the dead faith of the living.

How about the deacons and the Holy Gospel?

Oti lete afenti mou,oti lete .
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« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2013, 01:54:41 AM »

INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION!
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« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2013, 02:14:50 AM »

INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION!
What was it that Jesus said about vain repetition? Wink
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« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2013, 05:22:06 AM »

INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION! INNOVATION!
What was it that Jesus said about vain repetition? Wink

He could have at least done in it a dozen languages.
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« Reply #30 on: March 29, 2013, 06:49:45 AM »

I can't remember. I answer sunday night when I get back from the church.
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« Reply #31 on: March 29, 2013, 07:30:12 AM »

My official parish in early 1980': http://youtu.be/EM1XA6tq218?t=20m36s

Greek, Latin, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, German, Belarusian, and Church Slavonic.

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« Reply #32 on: March 30, 2013, 07:53:03 AM »

Of course Church Slavonic (as the main one - it's repeated after a few verses each time) and:
Polish, Greek, Latin, Romanian, English, German, 2-3 Eastern Slavic languages (Ukrainian, Belarussian and maybe Russian, I suppose, I don't remember it now) - all these read by priests plus sometimes Hebrew (read by the psalmist). Maybe something else, but I can't recall it now. So I'm waiting for Serbian (I think it would be possible if I asked the priests from my parish) and Arabic (much less possible, even if it was given in a transcription).

But I was shocked last year when in the Christ Saviour cathedral the Gospel was read also in Sanskrit, which is a sacral Hindu language.
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« Reply #33 on: March 30, 2013, 08:37:17 AM »

My official parish in early 1980': http://youtu.be/EM1XA6tq218?t=20m36s

Greek, Latin, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, German, Belarusian, and Church Slavonic.



Nice!
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« Reply #34 on: March 30, 2013, 08:38:44 AM »

My official parish in early 1980': http://youtu.be/EM1XA6tq218?t=20m36s

Greek, Latin, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, German, Belarusian, and Church Slavonic.



The Greek pronunciation is a funny mix between Erasmian and Modern Greek pronunciation.
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« Reply #35 on: March 30, 2013, 09:57:02 AM »

In my church, lay persons chant the Prologue in small chunks and then our priest chants it in total in English. Last Pascha, we were fortunate to have had people able to chant in the following:

Greek, Latin, Belorussian, Bulgarian, Church Slavonic, French, German, Italian, Macedonian, Romanian, Russian, Serbian, Spanish, Turkish and Ukrainian.

BTW, I do not know where Father gets them, but he has "Christ is Risen, Indeed He is Risen" in so many languages to make one's head spin. In source that we know is East Texan that is attributed to our ever-memorable and beloved Archbishop Dmitri:

Christ is up!
Yup!

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« Reply #36 on: March 30, 2013, 01:27:02 PM »

At my home parish, they have no deacon, so the priest always reads the Gospel. At the Paschal Liturgy, he reads the whole lession first in English, and then practices differ. One year he read it all again in Greek, then all again in Slavonic, and then the laity read from where they stood in various languages (reading after one another in the same reading). Another year, he read part in Greek, then switched to Slavonic, and then passed it on to the laity.

Usual languages we hear include: Greek, Slavonic, Spanish, French, Latin, German, Romanian and Swahili.

They also have the ridiculously long list of Paschal greetings in various languages. Their priest likes throwing out the Alaskan ones and tripping up everyone. They'll generally sing the Pashal tropar in multiple languages and melodies as well, usually Slavonic, Greek, Latin and Spanish in addition to English.
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« Reply #37 on: March 30, 2013, 03:58:07 PM »


But I was shocked last year when in the Christ Saviour cathedral the Gospel was read also in Sanskrit, which is a sacral Hindu language.

? Arabic is the Sacred language to Muslims, yet Orthodox still use it, why should Sanskrit be any different?
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« Reply #38 on: March 30, 2013, 04:19:10 PM »


But I was shocked last year when in the Christ Saviour cathedral the Gospel was read also in Sanskrit, which is a sacral Hindu language.

? Arabic is the Sacred language to Muslims, yet Orthodox still use it, why should Sanskrit be any different?

They might have used this version. Do you know of any other?
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« Reply #39 on: March 30, 2013, 04:22:17 PM »

My official parish in early 1980': http://youtu.be/EM1XA6tq218?t=20m36s

Greek, Latin, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, German, Belarusian, and Church Slavonic.



I like the Father who reads the Latin Gospel - he sounds like he could have been a Benedictine from Solesmes.
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« Reply #40 on: March 30, 2013, 05:17:14 PM »

? Arabic is the Sacred language to Muslims, yet Orthodox still use it, why should Sanskrit be any different?

There are not and there weren't Orthodox communities that use it in services. They could also read the Gospel in Quenya.

I like the Father who reads the Latin Gospel - he sounds like he could have been a Benedictine from Solesmes.

He is probably dead for a 20 years or so.
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« Reply #41 on: March 30, 2013, 05:55:55 PM »

In my Parish it looked like that:
the three Presbyters and a Deacon read the Gospel divided on 4 parts in 4 different languages (Belarusian, Ukrainian, Polish and Russian) and then the Deacon read the whole fragment in the language we normally use (Church Slavonic) again.


Here go my questions:
- Is it in your Parishes read in similar way or it's read whole in each language?
- Can it be read only be ordained Priests? I've heard that in some Parishes it's read by lay people (both male or female) and it made me curious.

Belarusian, Ukrainian, Polish, and Russian? Those are all basically different dialects of the same languages!  Wink....that was a joke.

At our parish, OCA, the Paschal Gospel is read whole in each language by each reader and all of the people reading are lay people except the priest who reads it in English.
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« Reply #42 on: March 30, 2013, 06:01:04 PM »

? Arabic is the Sacred language to Muslims, yet Orthodox still use it, why should Sanskrit be any different?

There are not and there weren't Orthodox communities that use it in services. They could also read the Gospel in Quenya.

I like the Father who reads the Latin Gospel - he sounds like he could have been a Benedictine from Solesmes.

He is probably dead for a 20 years or so.

There are Oriental Orthodox communities who use Sanskrit. Plus, It wouldn't matter if there weren't. The Paschal Gospel can be read in any language. Sometimes, I chant the psalms in Sanskrit at home.
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« Reply #43 on: March 30, 2013, 06:06:29 PM »

I like the Father who reads the Latin Gospel - he sounds like he could have been a Benedictine from Solesmes.

He is probably dead for a 20 years or so.

So you think it's wrong to use the present tense? In that video, he reads the Gospel forever and becomes contemporary with whoever watches it.

Memory eternal!  Wink
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« Reply #44 on: March 30, 2013, 06:07:31 PM »

So you think it's wrong to use the present tense? In that video, he reads the Gospel forever and becomes contemporary with whoever watches it.

Memory eternal!  Wink

You are the new St. Dionysius the Areopagite. That's deep, man.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 06:07:48 PM by Cyrillic » Logged

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« Reply #45 on: March 30, 2013, 11:13:30 PM »

Kristus nousi kuolleista!

- Is it in your Parishes read in similar way or it's read whole in each language?

My present parish seems to have the former practice whereas IIRC my previous parish had the latter practice.
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