Author Topic: Titles of the Psalms in the Eclogarion acccording to the Great Horologion  (Read 1349 times)

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Offline scamandrius

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In the HTM Great Horologion, in the Eclogarion section, before each psalm selection, there is a sub-title.  For instance, under the Polyeleos, the subtitle is "O Ye Servants, Praise the Lord.  Alleluia." (p.680) Another instance is for the birth of the Theotokos (p. 685), the subtitle is "His Meekness. Alleluia."  Now, I realize that these are just truncations of the first full verse, but what is the purpose of these?  Are they supposed to signal some specific melody?  Or are they sung verbal cues sung by the protopsaltis or canonarch to the rest of the chanters to indicate what hymn is to be sung next?  What's the deal?

Forgive me for lacking appropriate terminology in describing this.
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Offline Fr. George

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I'll take a look tomorrow, but off the top of my head they look like antiphonal responses, if one were to chant the psalm.
"O Cross of Christ, all-holy, thrice-blessed, and life-giving, instrument of the mystical rites of Zion, the holy Altar for the service of our Great Archpriest, the blessing - the weapon - the strength of priests, our pride, our consolation, the light in our hearts, our mind, and our steps"
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Offline Father H

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In the HTM Great Horologion, in the Eclogarion section, before each psalm selection, there is a sub-title.  For instance, under the Polyeleos, the subtitle is "O Ye Servants, Praise the Lord.  Alleluia." (p.680) Another instance is for the birth of the Theotokos (p. 685), the subtitle is "His Meekness. Alleluia."  Now, I realize that these are just truncations of the first full verse, but what is the purpose of these?  Are they supposed to signal some specific melody?  Or are they sung verbal cues sung by the protopsaltis or canonarch to the rest of the chanters to indicate what hymn is to be sung next?  What's the deal?

Forgive me for lacking appropriate terminology in describing this.

Yes, it is indicative of the melody.  You will also find this in the Octoechos (paraklitiki) where the subtitle indicates the melody that you are to sing the verses following.

Offline scamandrius

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^So, "Ye servants of the Lord. Alleluia." is a melody?  Just as "we wept" is its own particular melody?  I've never found these melodies as automela before.  Where do I then find the particular melodies for these pslams in the eclogarion?
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Offline arimethea

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In the HTM Great Horologion, in the Eclogarion section, before each psalm selection, there is a sub-title.  For instance, under the Polyeleos, the subtitle is "O Ye Servants, Praise the Lord.  Alleluia." (p.680) Another instance is for the birth of the Theotokos (p. 685), the subtitle is "His Meekness. Alleluia."  Now, I realize that these are just truncations of the first full verse, but what is the purpose of these?  Are they supposed to signal some specific melody?  Or are they sung verbal cues sung by the protopsaltis or canonarch to the rest of the chanters to indicate what hymn is to be sung next?  What's the deal?

Forgive me for lacking appropriate terminology in describing this.

Yes, it is indicative of the melody.  You will also find this in the Octoechos (paraklitiki) where the subtitle indicates the melody that you are to sing the verses following.

Father in this case what is being referenced is the typical refrain that is chanted at the end of each verse. What I have found interesting in HTM's Horologion is that many of the Psalms where the refrain is simply "Alleluia" they do list the last words of the first verse of the Psalm. I have yet to see a musical setting (outside of those that are done by HTM) that have the whole refrain. 
Joseph

Offline Father H

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In the HTM Great Horologion, in the Eclogarion section, before each psalm selection, there is a sub-title.  For instance, under the Polyeleos, the subtitle is "O Ye Servants, Praise the Lord.  Alleluia." (p.680) Another instance is for the birth of the Theotokos (p. 685), the subtitle is "His Meekness. Alleluia."  Now, I realize that these are just truncations of the first full verse, but what is the purpose of these?  Are they supposed to signal some specific melody?  Or are they sung verbal cues sung by the protopsaltis or canonarch to the rest of the chanters to indicate what hymn is to be sung next?  What's the deal?

Forgive me for lacking appropriate terminology in describing this.

Yes, it is indicative of the melody.  You will also find this in the Octoechos (paraklitiki) where the subtitle indicates the melody that you are to sing the verses following.

Father in this case what is being referenced is the typical refrain that is chanted at the end of each verse. What I have found interesting in HTM's Horologion is that many of the Psalms where the refrain is simply "Alleluia" they do list the last words of the first verse of the Psalm. I have yet to see a musical setting (outside of those that are done by HTM) that have the whole refrain. 

My apologies.  You are correct, in this case it is referencing the refrain.  As I was over in the Church this morning after morning prayers I got out the HTM Hor.  We can see this also in the 8th ode at Matins, where it is the refrains that are sung during the Ode (Praise the Lord...sing and exalt him throughout all the ages).   Most other places where it is not giving a refrain it is giving a once-said prelim verse with no rubrics, probably assuming that the Canonarch will know the difference.