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Author Topic: Russian Greetings  (Read 1148 times) Average Rating: 0
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Rosehip
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« on: May 04, 2009, 03:46:00 PM »

I noticed that Heorhij greeted one of our posters with "Privetsvuyu Vas", and I've got a question about htat, if you don't mind (it's interesting to me)! When I was in Ukraine, the Ukrainian Baptist believers always greeted one another in this manner-they said this is the "christian" way to greet one another, rather than "hi" or some other form. They also had the habit of announcing "Mir Bam!" (Peace to you!) upon entering a fellow-believer's home. So, my question-is this Orthodox custom as well? Also, at the end of their services, visitors from other congregations would formally announce "greetings" from their congregations, and the church would reply in unison "Prinimaem!" (We accept!). Then they would ask that their greetings be returned with the guest to his congregation. The people would then say "Prosim!" (We ask!)...

Is anyone else here familiar with these interesting customs???
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+ Our dear sister Martha (Rosehip) passed away on Dec 20, 2010.  May her memory be eternal! +
Heorhij
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« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2009, 05:36:12 PM »

Well, I am not familiar with the traditions of Russian Baptists, but the entrance greetings in Russian can be of very many kinds.

"Здравствуй(те)" - probably the most common, literally means "be healthy" but used as a "hello" (never "goodby"), can be less or more cordial depending on the intonation. A rather safe greeting, not too formal and yet polite, not too casual.

"Привет!" - literally "Greetings!" - a lot more casual, borders on too casual (I would not recommend, for example, to say it to your supervisor at work). "Приветствую (Вас, тебя)" - a bit archaic form of the former, used mostly humorously.

"Добрый день!" - literally "Good day," rather formal, can be substituted for "good morning" or "good evening" (respectedly "Доброе утро" and "Добрый вечер").
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Rosehip
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« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2009, 05:53:37 PM »

So, I wonder where the Baptists got their customs? Maybe from the epistles where the believers sent greetings to one another?
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+ Our dear sister Martha (Rosehip) passed away on Dec 20, 2010.  May her memory be eternal! +
Heorhij
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« Reply #3 on: May 04, 2009, 06:09:45 PM »

So, I wonder where the Baptists got their customs? Maybe from the epistles where the believers sent greetings to one another?

Yes, very likely so - from the Pauline epistles!
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