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Author Topic: Christos anesti ek nekron, thanato thanaton patisas kai tois en...  (Read 3740 times) Average Rating: 0
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truthstalker
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« on: April 30, 2009, 10:09:48 PM »

I heard this hymn most beautifully sung on You-tube.  This is my very poor translation, if I got it right:

Chiist rose from the dead
By death he struck death
And to those in the grave
He freely gives life.


(Christos anesti ek nekroon
thanato thanaton patisas
kai tois en tois mnimisi
zoen charisamenos)

patisas+ is it actually the aorist active participle of pato?

Is this a legitimate translation?

After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?
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Veniamin
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« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2009, 10:12:20 PM »

The usual translation is:

Christ is risen from the dead, trampling down death by death, and upon those in the tombs bestowing life.

It's the Paschal troparion and is sung dozens of times on Pascha itself, then throughout the Paschal season.
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« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2009, 10:24:31 PM »

I heard this hymn most beautifully sung on You-tube.  This is my very poor translation, if I got it right:

Chiist rose from the dead
By death he struck death
And to those in the grave
He freely gives life.


(Christos anesti ek nekroon
thanato thanaton patisas
kai tois en tois mnimisi
zoen charisamenos)

patisas+ is it actually the aorist active participle of pato?

Is this a legitimate translation?

After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

St. John of Damascus (see the icon on the left).  He also arranged the Pascha service, including writing the paschal verses: here's beautiful version in Romanian:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLquakalcvU

The beginning video is St. John writing.

He also wrote the Funeral Service.
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« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2009, 11:01:49 PM »

I heard this hymn most beautifully sung on You-tube.  This is my very poor translation, if I got it right:

Chiist rose from the dead
By death he struck death
And to those in the grave
He freely gives life.


(Christos anesti ek nekroon
thanato thanaton patisas
kai tois en tois mnimisi
zoen charisamenos)

patisas+ is it actually the aorist active participle of pato?

Is this a legitimate translation?

After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

Just to add to Isa's and Veniamin's comments: patisas is walking on, trampling underfoot, stepping over, etc.
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« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2009, 08:07:06 AM »

Thanks from transliteration. I always wanted to find it on myself but never had time.
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« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2009, 08:16:46 AM »

After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

It is such a gem of a hymn; a summary of what we believe about the Resurrection in such a short format.  It is done countless times during the Paschal season: during the week after Pascha, it is chanted 10 times at the beginning of every service, 4 times at the end (once as part of the Doxastikon, and 3 times on its own), during Matins it is chanted an additional 24 times (3 times after each ode of the Canon), and during Liturgies it is chanted an additional 8 times (4 before the entrance, 1 after, 1 after communion, and 3 instead of "Blessed be the name of the lord").  Then, at every service after Bright/Renewal Week, it is chanted three times at the beginning of each service.
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« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2009, 08:46:39 AM »

Mike, and the correct pronounciation is "ke tis en tis mnimasi" ("ai" is pronounced like "e" and "oi" like "i"). Here's how Divna Ljubojevic sings it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7tKexc4wSM
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« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2009, 09:06:01 AM »

After hearing it about ten times I can't get it out of my head, neither do I want to.

Do you know this hymn and who wrote it? Is it part of the liturgy?

It is such a gem of a hymn; a summary of what we believe about the Resurrection in such a short format.  It is done countless times during the Paschal season: during the week after Pascha, it is chanted 10 times at the beginning of every service, 4 times at the end (once as part of the Doxastikon, and 3 times on its own), during Matins it is chanted an additional 24 times (3 times after each ode of the Canon), and during Liturgies it is chanted an additional 8 times (4 before the entrance, 1 after, 1 after communion, and 3 instead of "Blessed be the name of the lord").  Then, at every service after Bright/Renewal Week, it is chanted three times at the beginning of each service.

A little enthusiastic about it, are the Orthodox?  I've seen video of it sung solo by a man, and a woman, and various choirs of nuns and monks in Greece and Serbia.

The pronounciation is a little different than I was taught. They have "kai" rhyming with hay; I thought it rhymed with sky. This threw me until I found it written out, and then I still used someone else's translation.
And tis for tois, where I would have it sound like toys.  I was hoping I could follow the Greek at a service, but I wonder.
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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2009, 11:26:43 AM »

A little enthusiastic about it, are the Orthodox?  I've seen video of it sung solo by a man, and a woman, and various choirs of nuns and monks in Greece and Serbia.

Quite enthusiastic, I dare say.  But it still is not as popular as the #1 Orthodox prayer of all the divine Services, and of the Divine Liturgy: "Lord, have mercy."

The pronounciation is a little different than I was taught. They have "kai" rhyming with hay; I thought it rhymed with sky. This threw me until I found it written out, and then I still used someone else's translation.
And tis for tois, where I would have it sound like toys.  I was hoping I could follow the Greek at a service, but I wonder.

You were probably taught Erasmian pronunciation of Ancient Greek.  The ai in "kai" is pronounced like the e in pet.  And the tis pronunciation for tois is the right way (at least for New Testament, Patristic, and Modern Greek).
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« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2009, 11:46:05 AM »

A little enthusiastic about it, are the Orthodox?  I've seen video of it sung solo by a man, and a woman, and various choirs of nuns and monks in Greece and Serbia.

Most definitely. At my parish, for Pascha, we sing it in English, Greek, Slavonic, Romanian, Spanish, Arabic and Japanese. Then generally just in English, Slavonic and Greek throughout the rest of the Paschal period.

Quote
The pronounciation is a little different than I was taught. They have "kai" rhyming with hay; I thought it rhymed with sky. This threw me until I found it written out, and then I still used someone else's translation.
And tis for tois, where I would have it sound like toys.  I was hoping I could follow the Greek at a service, but I wonder.

If your Greek training is a typical Koine Greek class then you'll catch some words, but no you won't really be able to follow actual spoken Greek.
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« Reply #10 on: May 01, 2009, 12:11:19 PM »

St. John of Damascus

Really? I thought it would be older. How does one account for the hymn being sung in all the OO churches? Do they admit to St. John's authorship or do they have an alternate source?

Or do you mean he was just the composer of the melody?
« Last Edit: May 01, 2009, 12:17:30 PM by Orthodox11 » Logged
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