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Author Topic: Non-Slavic Paschal tradtions  (Read 5101 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: April 12, 2009, 03:33:13 PM »

What special customs for Pascha do you: Greeks, Romanians, Arabs, Anglo-Saxons, Copts and Others have? I doubt it's blessing the food basket or playing with Easter eggs but I suppose you certainly have some Smiley
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2009, 05:16:55 PM »

Lamb is ususally the meat that is served at Pascha in a variety of of forms. It can be roasted, or stuffed in grape leaves or made into a type of Arab meatloaf called kibbee.

Egg fights are a big deal with Arab Orthodox Christians. My dad and his father used to go from house to house cracking eggs among the large Orthodox community in their neighborhood of western PA. We grew up playing this game at church and at home. Last year, I left a recipe for making really, red eggs without harmful dyes. Here is the picture I took of the eggs.But red eggs are both an Arab and Greek custom.

Pious legends

While the origin of Easter eggs can be explained in the symbolic terms described above, a pious legend among followers of Eastern Christianity says that Mary Magdalene was bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women at the tomb of Jesus, and the eggs in her basket miraculously turned brilliant red when she saw the risen Christ.[7]
A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.




These Arab Orthodox Easter cookies are called maahmool and are made for Pascha. The recipe is also under feasting foods. We make these each year. The insides are filled with dates, walnuts or pistachios depending on the mold image.


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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2009, 05:22:00 PM »

thanks for sharing

we dyed eggs by boiling them with onion rinds
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« Reply #3 on: April 12, 2009, 10:46:34 PM »

You mean they threw the red eggs at people's homes?  I saw something about cracking eggs from Ozgeorge in another thread but I'm still not sure what this means.

I may have to get some lamb for Sunday. 
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« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2009, 11:00:19 PM »

You mean they threw the red eggs at people's homes?  I saw something about cracking eggs from Ozgeorge in another thread but I'm still not sure what this means.

I may have to get some lamb for Sunday. 

No, we don't throw them. We hold the egg with one of our hands with the pointed end of the egg up and our fingers around the end. Then the other person takes his egg and with the pointed end of his egg and taps the top of the the other person's egg and says, "Al Maseeh Qam!"
And the person whose egg is being hit responds by saying, "Huuqan Qam!" (Which is the Arabic version of, "Christ is Risen ...Truly He has risen!"). These egg fights usually start right after the Pascha Divine Liturgy and continue on during the days of Bright week until all your eggs are cracked.
I was told the cracking of the egg symbolizes Christ breaking the bonds of death and rising from the tomb.
I believe the Greeks have this same tradition of egg fights.
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2009, 03:40:02 AM »

Quote
I believe the Greeks have this same tradition of egg fights.

Indeed, we do.
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« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2009, 03:43:28 AM »

The insides are filled with dates, walnuts or pistachios depending on the mold image.




The competition is on again this year Tamara- Post your pics and I'll post mine!
http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,11177.msg224141.html#msg224141
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« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2009, 03:54:02 AM »

I was talking to a friend of mine who's ancestry is from Vojvodina, and she said that they die eggs brown and green in addition to the regular red.  Does anybody else observe this custom?  
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« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2009, 12:03:52 PM »

I was talking to a friend of mine who's ancestry is from Vojvodina, and she said that they die eggs brown and green in addition to the regular red.  Does anybody else observe this custom?  


are they brown? I've never been good at colors...

We also have egg fights. The winner takes an eggs of the defeated and has to eat it. There is also a game in what a slope from a board is made. Eggs are being rolled down on it. The winner is whose egg rolled furthest.
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« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2009, 06:36:25 PM »

The insides are filled with dates, walnuts or pistachios depending on the mold image.




The competition is on again this year Tamara- Post your pics and I'll post mine!
http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,11177.msg224141.html#msg224141

Hi George,

I made mah'mool yesterday with my sis. But I left all the cookies at her house because they have the big lamb roast there on Sunday. Post your pictures. I would love to see your Pascha spread.  Smiley

I will try and post pictures from Sunday showing the food and the lamb roasting.
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« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2009, 07:10:40 PM »

I was talking to a friend of mine who's ancestry is from Vojvodina, and she said that they die eggs brown and green in addition to the regular red.  Does anybody else observe this custom?  


are they brown? I've never been good at colors...

We also have egg fights. The winner takes an eggs of the defeated and has to eat it. There is also a game in what a slope from a board is made. Eggs are being rolled down on it. The winner is whose egg rolled furthest.
So you have egg fights like we do? How neat!  Smiley
I just remembered, Palestinian Orthodox Christians dye eggs with natural dyes and use leaf patterns on the egg similar
to this photo below. One Palestinian woman I know uses brown and greens colors with her leaf patterns.


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« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2009, 07:22:39 PM »

I just remembered, Palestinian Orthodox Christians dye eggs with natural dyes and use leaf patterns on the egg similar
to this photo below. One Palestinian woman I know uses brown and greens colors with her leaf patterns.

Neat!  That's almost exactly what my friend's eggs came out like.  We had to hunt all over to find the right kind of leaves to boil to get the right colours.   
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« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2009, 07:25:26 PM »

Surely the Greeks on this forum should have contributed by now  Tongue Tongue:

Koulouria. Tsourekia. Mageiritsa. Lamb. And more lamb. Kokoretsi.
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« Reply #13 on: April 14, 2009, 10:20:34 PM »

Tamara,
How many mahmoul does the recipe you posted here last year make?
http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,11177.msg208657.html#msg208657
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« Reply #14 on: April 14, 2009, 11:32:21 PM »

Tamara,
How many mahmoul does the recipe you posted here last year make?
http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,11177.msg208657.html#msg208657

One recipe makes about 40 cookies. We doubled it for the party on Sunday.
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« Reply #15 on: April 14, 2009, 11:33:36 PM »

I just remembered, Palestinian Orthodox Christians dye eggs with natural dyes and use leaf patterns on the egg similar
to this photo below. One Palestinian woman I know uses brown and greens colors with her leaf patterns.

Neat!  That's almost exactly what my friend's eggs came out like.  We had to hunt all over to find the right kind of leaves to boil to get the right colours.   

Do you remember what leaves you used and how they were prepared? The eggs come out so lovely.
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« Reply #16 on: April 15, 2009, 12:28:05 AM »

I just remembered, Palestinian Orthodox Christians dye eggs with natural dyes and use leaf patterns on the egg similar
to this photo below. One Palestinian woman I know uses brown and greens colors with her leaf patterns.

Neat!  That's almost exactly what my friend's eggs came out like.  We had to hunt all over to find the right kind of leaves to boil to get the right colours.   

Do you remember what leaves you used and how they were prepared? The eggs come out so lovely.

Just boil yellow onion peels and we used pecan leaves to get the colour.
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« Reply #17 on: April 15, 2009, 11:41:43 AM »

While the origin of Easter eggs can be explained in the symbolic terms described above, a pious legend among followers of Eastern Christianity says that Mary Magdalene was bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women at the tomb of Jesus, and the eggs in her basket miraculously turned brilliant red when she saw the risen Christ.[7]
A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.[/color]
These sound a bit fanciful to me. Rather more likely is that we use eggs to represent the Resurrection because eggs are trinitarian in nature--shell, yolk, and white--and that they bring life.
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« Reply #18 on: April 15, 2009, 01:22:39 PM »

While the origin of Easter eggs can be explained in the symbolic terms described above, a pious legend among followers of Eastern Christianity says that Mary Magdalene was bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women at the tomb of Jesus, and the eggs in her basket miraculously turned brilliant red when she saw the risen Christ.[7]
A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.[/color]
These sound a bit fanciful to me. Rather more likely is that we use eggs to represent the Resurrection because eggs are trinitarian in nature--shell, yolk, and white--and that they bring life.
No, I have heard the tradition regarding Mary Magdalene/red egg before in my parish.
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« Reply #19 on: April 15, 2009, 03:40:38 PM »

While the origin of Easter eggs can be explained in the symbolic terms described above, a pious legend among followers of Eastern Christianity says that Mary Magdalene was bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women at the tomb of Jesus, and the eggs in her basket miraculously turned brilliant red when she saw the risen Christ.[7]
A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.[/color]
These sound a bit fanciful to me. Rather more likely is that we use eggs to represent the Resurrection because eggs are trinitarian in nature--shell, yolk, and white--and that they bring life.
No, I have heard the tradition regarding Mary Magdalene/red egg before in my parish.

Yes, I have heard this tradition too, that is why I a shared the legends. You would have to wonder for what reason the early Christians chose to use an egg dyed red as a symbol of Christ's resurrection. If we can believe in weeping icons and miraculous healings, how difficult is it to believe an egg changed color? With God all things, no matter how small, are possible.
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« Reply #20 on: April 15, 2009, 04:38:17 PM »

Yes, I have heard this tradition too, that is why I a shared the legends. You would have to wonder for what reason the early Christians chose to use an egg dyed red as a symbol of Christ's resurrection. If we can believe in weeping icons and miraculous healings, how difficult is it to believe an egg changed color? With God all things, no matter how small, are possible.
I don't believe everything I hear. You are right that with God all things are possible; but it is equally true that with humans all things are subject to interpretation. The source must always be considered; and considering that the only place I've heard this story is on the Internet, from someone who heard it from someone in their parish, you'll forgive me if I remain cautious. I hope you don't find my lack of faith disturbing. Wink
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« Reply #21 on: April 15, 2009, 05:19:06 PM »

A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.[/color]

Heard that too. Here you got an icon:


Do you remember what leaves you used and how they were prepared? The eggs come out so lovely.

I post mine If you don't mind Smiley

Yellow: leaves of birch, alder; flowers of buttercup or chamomile; onion leaves
Red: oak's bark; elder's fruits; onion leaves (more and longer); dried blueberries
Pink: beetroot juice
Orange: carrots, pumpkinks
Blue: blackthorn's fruits
Violet: dark mallow's petals
Green: grass, nettle (ouch!), young rye, birches' bark
Brown: onion leaves (looong to boil and maaaany to put)
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« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2009, 08:31:22 PM »

A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.[/color]

Heard that too. Here you got an icon:

Wow, very nice. Icons are a good source of information about our past.

Do you remember what leaves you used and how they were prepared? The eggs come out so lovely.

Quote
I post mine If you don't mind Smiley

Yellow: leaves of birch, alder; flowers of buttercup or chamomile; onion leaves
Red: oak's bark; elder's fruits; onion leaves (more and longer); dried blueberries
Pink: beetroot juice
Orange: carrots, pumpkinks
Blue: blackthorn's fruits
Violet: dark mallow's petals
Green: grass, nettle (ouch!), young rye, birches' bark
Brown: onion leaves (looong to boil and maaaany to put)

Thank you.  Smiley Do you boil these leaves like Νεκτάριος indicated in his post above? If you do, how long do you need to boil
the leaves to insure a good color transfer to the egg?
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« Reply #23 on: April 15, 2009, 08:35:35 PM »

Yes, I have heard this tradition too, that is why I a shared the legends. You would have to wonder for what reason the early Christians chose to use an egg dyed red as a symbol of Christ's resurrection. If we can believe in weeping icons and miraculous healings, how difficult is it to believe an egg changed color? With God all things, no matter how small, are possible.
I don't believe everything I hear. You are right that with God all things are possible; but it is equally true that with humans all things are subject to interpretation. The source must always be considered; and considering that the only place I've heard this story is on the Internet, from someone who heard it from someone in their parish, you'll forgive me if I remain cautious. I hope you don't find my lack of faith disturbing. Wink
It is fine if you seek out sources but just remember alot of our traditions are oral only and have been passed down through the generations. I believe the eggs turned red for Mary Magdalene because it is a part of our oral tradition handed down to me in my parish. And I have known other middle-eastern American Orthodox friends who have also heard this story in their parishes. The story details may have changed but I believe God changed the egg red in order for it to be a symbol.
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« Reply #24 on: April 15, 2009, 11:30:14 PM »

Yes, I have heard this tradition too, that is why I a shared the legends. You would have to wonder for what reason the early Christians chose to use an egg dyed red as a symbol of Christ's resurrection. If we can believe in weeping icons and miraculous healings, how difficult is it to believe an egg changed color? With God all things, no matter how small, are possible.
I don't believe everything I hear. You are right that with God all things are possible; but it is equally true that with humans all things are subject to interpretation. The source must always be considered; and considering that the only place I've heard this story is on the Internet, from someone who heard it from someone in their parish, you'll forgive me if I remain cautious. I hope you don't find my lack of faith disturbing. Wink
It is fine if you seek out sources but just remember alot of our traditions are oral only and have been passed down through the generations. I believe the eggs turned red for Mary Magdalene because it is a part of our oral tradition handed down to me in my parish. And I have known other middle-eastern American Orthodox friends who have also heard this story in their parishes. The story details may have changed but I believe God changed the egg red in order for it to be a symbol.
Preach it, sister!  Cheesy  I agree 100%.
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« Reply #25 on: April 16, 2009, 08:51:38 AM »

Yes, I have heard this tradition too, that is why I a shared the legends. You would have to wonder for what reason the early Christians chose to use an egg dyed red as a symbol of Christ's resurrection. If we can believe in weeping icons and miraculous healings, how difficult is it to believe an egg changed color? With God all things, no matter how small, are possible.
I don't believe everything I hear. You are right that with God all things are possible; but it is equally true that with humans all things are subject to interpretation. The source must always be considered; and considering that the only place I've heard this story is on the Internet, from someone who heard it from someone in their parish, you'll forgive me if I remain cautious. I hope you don't find my lack of faith disturbing. Wink
It is fine if you seek out sources but just remember alot of our traditions are oral only and have been passed down through the generations. I believe the eggs turned red for Mary Magdalene because it is a part of our oral tradition handed down to me in my parish. And I have known other middle-eastern American Orthodox friends who have also heard this story in their parishes. The story details may have changed but I believe God changed the egg red in order for it to be a symbol.
Oral traditions have sources too.
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« Reply #26 on: April 16, 2009, 09:20:12 AM »

A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.[/color]

Heard that too. Here you got an icon:
Nice, I have seen this icon as well in the Antiochian circles. I always assumed that it was because of the very tradition that we have been speaking about.

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« Reply #27 on: April 16, 2009, 12:18:28 PM »

Quote
A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.

Oh yes ,it's a real and iera paradosis ,see this clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11ypMp7b7BM  (from4:20 )

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« Reply #28 on: April 16, 2009, 03:55:24 PM »

Quote
A different, but not necessarily conflicting, legend concerns Mary Magdalene's efforts to spread the Gospel. According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with “Christ has risen,” whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red.

Oh yes ,it's a real and iera paradosis ,see this clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11ypMp7b7BM  (from4:20 )



thank you. I believe our oral tradition on this one but this should help those who are in doubt.
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« Reply #29 on: April 18, 2009, 06:09:25 PM »

I had a Greek-American friend of mine watch the youtube video that Elpidophoros posted. He did a rough translation from the narration which was in Greek. In the video, the narrator explains they are in the city of Magdala where the Mary Magdalene was born. The Russian Orthodox church shown in the video is where the icon of Mary Magadalene with the red egg is found (also shown in the video). The narrator then tells the story...Mary Magdalene was pleading with Pilate for something, and the emperor was there, listening indifferently until she said that Christ had risen.  When the emperor heard her say that Christ had risen, he emperor laughed and told her that was impossible.  At that point, a slave (sclava) was walking by with some eggs, and the emperor pointed to the eggs and said that he would believe Christ had risen when those eggs turned red.  At that moment Mary walked over to the eggs, picked one up, and they all turned red.  "Christ is Risen!" she told the Emperor.
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« Reply #30 on: April 18, 2009, 06:27:19 PM »

I don't know how much of this is Coptic, by my grandmother always had to have us eat hard-boiled eggs after the Liturgy.

My relatives in Egypt also like to color eggs around this time.  I haven't seen much of this tradition around where I live in the states, but it's more prevalent it seems in Egypt.

In our Coptic Church nevertheless, we do have an ostrich egg hanging outside the doorway of the altar (or each altar if one has more than one) decorated with colors and patterns or embroidery, representing rebirth (the insides are sucked out through a hole poked through, so no one has to worry about a rotten egg in the Church).  It's quite a unique tradition in Coptic iconostasis.

Xristos Anesti!
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« Reply #31 on: April 18, 2009, 10:40:53 PM »

Do you have a custom of Easter Breakfast? Do you take baskets with Paschal fod to a Church to have it blessed?
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Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic Orthodox Archdiocese of North America
Posts: 11,413


Strengthen O Lord the work of Your hands(Is 19:25)


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« Reply #32 on: April 18, 2009, 11:21:57 PM »

Do you have a custom of Easter Breakfast? Do you take baskets with Paschal fod to a Church to have it blessed?

No, not really.  But we do enjoy our first fried egg breakfast in Easter of that year  Grin

We do go to Church to get blessings, and modest gifts of chocolates and mini icons.

We usually also go there to watch over the children who like to play games at the church hall.  Maybe a play will be done.  And then people go home and prepare for family dinner, where all cousins and friends go to certain houses and have a grand time together.
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Vain existence can never exist, for \\\"unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain.\\\" (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.
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