Author Topic: Book on Orthodox Worship  (Read 1260 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline falafel333

  • Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 337
Book on Orthodox Worship
« on: April 05, 2009, 11:22:12 PM »
Whenever I read any texts on Byzantine and Slavic worship, whether on this forum or anywhere else, I come across so many terms that it can often be quite confusing. Terms such as Parakliti, Octoichos, Pentecostarion, Triodion, Menaion, Menlogoion, Irmos, Orthros, Akathist, Stichera, etc

I was just wondering if there's any good book recommendations that anyone can make that may provide some explanation of Byzantine and Slavic worship and define some of the terms mentioned above.

If there's anything that provides information with regards to the history and authorship of some of these prayers and hymns that would be great as well.

On another note I was just wondering if anyone might have any good book recommendations with regards to the Byzantine and Slavic liturgy service (euchologion) and services of the hours (horologion).

Thanks in advance

Online ialmisry

  • There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
  • Hypatos
  • *****************
  • Posts: 38,500
Re: Book on Orthodox Worship
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2009, 11:27:15 PM »
Whenever I read any texts on Byzantine and Slavic worship, whether on this forum or anywhere else, I come across so many terms that it can often be quite confusing. Terms such as Parakliti, Octoichos, Pentecostarion, Triodion, Menaion, Menlogoion, Irmos, Orthros, Akathist, Stichera, etc

I was just wondering if there's any good book recommendations that anyone can make that may provide some explanation of Byzantine and Slavic worship and define some of the terms mentioned above.

If there's anything that provides information with regards to the history and authorship of some of these prayers and hymns that would be great as well.

On another note I was just wondering if anyone might have any good book recommendations with regards to the Byzantine and Slavic liturgy service (euchologion) and services of the hours (horologion).

Thanks in advance

One of Bishop Ware's translations, I think the Lenten Triodion but maybe the Festal Menaion gives an overview of the structure of the services, differences between Greek and Slavonic use (and names), etc.
Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth

Offline Fr. George

  • formerly "Cleveland"
  • Administrator
  • Stratopedarches
  • *******
  • Posts: 20,206
  • May the Lord bless you and keep you always!
  • Faith: Orthodox Christian
  • Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Pittsburgh
Re: Book on Orthodox Worship
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2009, 11:40:16 PM »
Whenever I read any texts on Byzantine and Slavic worship, whether on this forum or anywhere else, I come across so many terms that it can often be quite confusing. Terms such as Parakliti, Octoichos, Pentecostarion, Triodion, Menaion, Menlogoion, Irmos, Orthros, Akathist, Stichera, etc

I was just wondering if there's any good book recommendations that anyone can make that may provide some explanation of Byzantine and Slavic worship and define some of the terms mentioned above.

If there's anything that provides information with regards to the history and authorship of some of these prayers and hymns that would be great as well.


I'll take a stab at it (copying your spelling, even if I would transliterate it differently, just for consistency's sake):

Parakliti, Octoichos, They are the same book (2 different names for the same one) - a book of hymns for every day of the week (Saturday evening through the following Saturday morning) in the Eight Modes/Tones, based on the commemorations of the day (Sunday = Resurrection, Thursday = Apostles, etc.).  This is a foundational book for the services of Vespers, Midnight Office, and Matins in the daily cycle.  It will frequently also contain hymns sung during the Matins services on weekdays in Lent (although these hymns are usually in the back section).

Pentecostarion, The book for the season between Pascha and All Saints Sunday (which is 57 days); this book replaces the "Parakliti, Octoichos" during this time period.

Triodion, The book with hymns for the period between the Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee and Great and Holy Saturday; the three sections are Pre-Lent, Lent, and Holy Week.  During Pre-Lent, it supplements the "Parakliti, Octoichos" on weekends (generally); during Lent, it supplements the "Parakliti, Octoichos" on weekends and replaces it on weekdays (generally); during Holy Week it replaces completely the "Parakliti, Octoichos."

Menaion, Menlogoion, - Two terms for the same books - the books with hymns for the commemorations of the dates of the year (for example, December 6 is St. Nicholas of Myra, January 7 is the Synaxis of St. John the Baptist).  Depending on the feast, this either supplements the "Parakliti, Octoichos" or replaces it (for larger feastdays).

Irmos, - A hymn of a Canon which is used as a musical pattern for other hymns.

Orthros, - Also called "Matins," this is the Dawn service in the daily cycle of Orthodox worship.

Akathist, - A collection of poems (called Kontakia and Oikoi) which is read/intoned/chanted without sitting down (Akathist literally means "without sitting").  The most famous Akathist is the one that St. Romanos the Melodist wrote to the Virgin Mary (done on the Fridays of Great Lent in the Roman/Byzantine tradition).

Stichera - A generic term for "a hymn."
"O Cross of Christ, all-holy, thrice-blessed, and life-giving, instrument of the mystical rites of Zion, the holy Altar for the service of our Great Archpriest, the blessing - the weapon - the strength of priests, our pride, our consolation, the light in our hearts, our mind, and our steps"
Met. Meletios of Nikopolis & Preveza, from his ordination.

Offline minasoliman

  • Mr., Sir, Dude, Guy, Male, tr. Minas in Greek, Menes in white people Egyptologists :-P
  • Section Moderator
  • Toumarches
  • *****
  • Posts: 13,492
  • Strengthen O Lord the work of Your hands(Is 19:25)
Re: Book on Orthodox Worship
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2009, 02:05:07 PM »
Perhaps this can be a sticky for others to read:  A glossary of Orthodox Worship.
Vain existence can never exist, for "unless the LORD builds the house, the builders labor in vain." (Psalm 127)

If the faith is unchanged and rock solid, then the gates of Hades never prevailed in the end.