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Author Topic: Strange icons  (Read 37954 times) Average Rating: 0
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« Reply #90 on: September 11, 2011, 02:15:40 AM »


The Panagia of Charon (death), Lipsi islands, Dodecanese, Greece

This work is typical of the western religious art, and devotional practices, which came into various regions of Greece during Venetian rule.
I think the one in Lipsi is wonderworking.
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« Reply #91 on: September 11, 2011, 05:08:06 AM »


The Panagia of Charon (death), Lipsi islands, Dodecanese, Greece

This work is typical of the western religious art, and devotional practices, which came into various regions of Greece during Venetian rule.
Indeed. The iconographer though keeps the Orthodox tradition and depicts her face in dispassion. The icon was written in the 1600's by monks from the Monastery of Patmos.
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I think the one in Lipsi is wonderworking.
Yes it is. Since 1943, small branches of lillies with no roots are put on the icon in Spring, which bloom every 23rd August
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« Reply #92 on: September 11, 2011, 05:41:12 PM »


The Panagia of Charon (death), Lipsi islands, Dodecanese, Greece

This work is typical of the western religious art, and devotional practices, which came into various regions of Greece during Venetian rule.

OOOOPS!! Mods, could this post be shifted to the Theotokos of Charon thread?  Embarrassed Embarrassed Embarrassed
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« Reply #93 on: September 12, 2011, 04:38:09 PM »


Icon at  the Monastery of Gelati.

I'm not sure what's so "strange" about that icon... it's a detail from the Icon of the Last Judgment. Any icon of the Last Judgment will have details like this at the bottom (and it can be clearly seen in the pic that this is just the bottom of a much larger fresco/icon), and most often appear on the Western wall of a chapel or church. i.e. you see it as you leave a service.
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« Reply #94 on: September 12, 2011, 07:33:03 PM »

and most often appear on the Western wall of a chapel or church. i.e. you see it as you leave a service.
Joel Osteen would not approve! laugh

I think it's fine as long as the figurative parts are explained.


Also, boob snakes laugh. Yes, I'm a 5 year-old.
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« Reply #95 on: September 13, 2011, 04:21:48 PM »

This is somehow supposed to be the Trinity. I think.




This is 'Holy Silence.' Not exactly sure why it copies some elements of the Virgin of the Sign.




This is, somehow, the Ancient of Days and the Holy Spirit. Maybe. Er....




'Angel Countenance.' Angels are normally depicted as male.  Undecided




'Angel of the Sign.' With all respect, an angel did not give birth to Jesus.  Huh




There were weirder ones. I would like to see a book on unusual icons, if only to show us what is not allowed and what is.

I'm not defending the Icon of Holy Silence as I don't know enough yet about icons so I do not intend to offend anyone or argue. However I watched the DVD "Theoria" which explains its meaning. It is based on the verses from Exodus 23:20 and refers to the Angel of God's Countenance, holding the sphere containing the Logos, the Name, the Word of God. It has to do with the Divine Revelation as it was to Moses, Abraham, and Jacob. Perhaps if anyone is really interested in delving deeper into the meaning of that one he should watch the dvd or contact the school which produced that particular one rather than criticize it right off the bat.
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« Reply #96 on: September 13, 2011, 08:07:15 PM »

Quote
I'm not defending the Icon of Holy Silence as I don't know enough yet about icons so I do not intend to offend anyone or argue. However I watched the DVD "Theoria" which explains its meaning. It is based on the verses from Exodus 23:20 and refers to the Angel of God's Countenance, holding the sphere containing the Logos, the Name, the Word of God. It has to do with the Divine Revelation as it was to Moses, Abraham, and Jacob. Perhaps if anyone is really interested in delving deeper into the meaning of that one he should watch the dvd or contact the school which produced that particular one rather than criticize it right off the bat.


Of old, the incorporeal and uncircumscribed God was not depicted at all. But now that God has appeared in the flesh and lived among men, I make an image of the God who can be seen. I do not worship matter, but I worship the Creator of matter, who through matter effected my salvation. I will not cease to venerate the matter through which my salvation has been effected. (St John of Damascus)

There is nothing St John of Damascus can't answer.

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« Reply #97 on: November 07, 2012, 07:45:28 PM »

A refreshemnt of the old thread because of popularity of "Schlock icons". I prefer something more spirtual-benefit Wink


I don't know if it's very strange, but I've seen first time in my life such type of icon of the Theotokos:



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« Reply #98 on: November 07, 2012, 09:57:33 PM »

The above is known as The Multiplier of Wheat. Here's part of a post from an older thread:

Quote
The primary meaning of the iconographic mandorla is that it represents the Uncreated Light and Glory of God. Its presence around Christ makes perfect sense in icons of the Resurrection and Transfiguration (for obvious reasons), of the Ascension (proclaiming the full glorification of Christ's human nature and reiteration of His divinity, something mentioned many times in the hymnography of the feast), of Christ in Majesty (Christ enthroned in heaven, surrounded by seraphim and cherubim), and in icons of the Mother of God of the Sign (Platytera, Znamennaya), where Christ Emmanuel is shown over His mother's body, signifying most clearly the Incarnation of God as a Divine Child.

The presence of Christ in a mandorla in icons of the Dormition signify the mystical appearance of Christ, accepting the soul of His mother, to escort it to heaven. Normally, the souls of saints, represented as a babe in swaddling-clothes, in their dormition icons are taken to heaven by angels. Given the exalted status of the Mother of God, it is only fitting and proper that Christ Himself takes her soul. A "mere" angel simply won't do. And His holding her soul is also a lovely counterpoint to the iconography and hymnography of the Mother of God holding her Son.

There are images of the Mother of God surrounded by a mandorla. Here is part of a post of mine from the "Canonical Icons" thread:

The Multiplier of Wheat shows the Mother of God surrounded by a mandorla, an oval motif of rays and stars which represents the uncreated light and glory of God. This is a major error in iconography, as the Virgin, while, of course, partaking of the glory and life of God, is not divine herself. She does not generate this light. Christ alone may be depicted in this light, such as in icons of Christ in Majesty (Christ enthroned, surrounded by the bodiless hosts), the Transfiguration, the Dormition of His mother (where He is seen holding her soul in the form of a babe in swaddling clothes, surely one of the loveliest of iconographic motifs, and truly loaded with theological meaning), and in icons of the Mother of God of the Sign, where He, as Christ Emmanuel, is surrounded by a circular mandorla over His mother's body as she holds her arms raised in supplication. By contrast, a mandorla is often seen in western images (paintings and statues) of the Virgin, notably in Our Lady of Guadelupe.

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,44905.msg754288.html#msg754288
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« Reply #99 on: November 07, 2012, 10:16:38 PM »

The above is known as The Multiplier of Wheat. Here's part of a post from an older thread:

Do all of the Multiplier of Wheat icons include the mandorla? I've seen this icon so many times that I never paid any attention, and can't remember now.
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« Reply #100 on: November 07, 2012, 10:19:10 PM »

The above is known as The Multiplier of Wheat. Here's part of a post from an older thread:

Do all of the Multiplier of Wheat icons include the mandorla? I've seen this icon so many times that I never paid any attention, and can't remember now.

All the many versions I've seen have the mandorla.
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« Reply #101 on: November 07, 2012, 10:19:53 PM »

I have one that is similar to the Multiplier. It's Russian. I find it comforting, even though it looks unusual.
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« Reply #102 on: November 17, 2012, 12:51:28 PM »

Here's one without a mandorla, but this site calls it "Grower of Crops" instead of Multiplier of Wheat:

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« Reply #103 on: November 17, 2012, 01:03:04 PM »

Here's one without a mandorla, but this site calls it "Grower of Crops" instead of Multiplier of Wheat[/img]

That's the same name, isn't it?
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« Reply #104 on: November 17, 2012, 01:10:46 PM »

That's the same name, isn't it?

You're probably right...
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« Reply #105 on: January 15, 2013, 06:01:59 PM »

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« Reply #106 on: January 15, 2013, 06:43:51 PM »



This image was produced for the purpose of using it as part of an anti-abortion campaign. Icons must never be used to promote social or political causes, even if such causes are good ones. God is above and beyond politics, and to turn a holy image into a sociopolitical mascot is nothing short of shameful.  Angry Angry Angry
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« Reply #107 on: January 15, 2013, 06:49:47 PM »

Was it? I'm no expert, but a GIS indicates a lot of icons of the Visitation depict Christ and the Forerunner. I'd be curious to read up on that icon's origins, if you have a source. Because independent of whatever agenda it might be pushing, I kind of like it.
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« Reply #108 on: January 15, 2013, 07:06:03 PM »

I've posted it becasue I'm interested in its origin like That person and I've never seen such icon before.

As for anti-abortion icons, I've seen 3 types of it (I think). Of course the task of icon is different, but on the other hand, we know that Church should protect life, and some peopel find icons as an instrument for it, so, maybe in this case, it would be better if it was a kind of picutre, similar to icon?... I'm just thinking out loud
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« Reply #109 on: January 15, 2013, 07:08:25 PM »

Was it? I'm no expert, but a GIS indicates a lot of icons of the Visitation depict Christ and the Forerunner. I'd be curious to read up on that icon's origins, if you have a source. Because independent of whatever agenda it might be pushing, I kind of like it.

There is only one historic instance I've come across of the fetuses being visible in a Visitation icon, in a fresco in Cyprus, IIRC 17thC. In this fresco, the unborns are not surrounded by a womb-like enclosure; they are painted in a similar style to the Christ of the 12th C Ustiug Annunciation. Be that as it may, the fact that the Cypriot Visitation and the Ustiug Annunciation are the only known examples of the portrayal of the unborn, this should give us pause before regarding such a representation as proper or canonical.

It is also a fact that the type of image posted by Dominika has been used in recent years, in violation of the spirit and purpose of iconography, as the mascot for various anti-abortion campaigns.
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« Reply #110 on: January 15, 2013, 09:31:59 PM »

A lot of More Spacious than the Heavens icons use the womb-type thing. Dunno how historic this practice is though.
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« Reply #111 on: January 15, 2013, 10:10:02 PM »

A lot of More Spacious than the Heavens icons use the womb-type thing. Dunno how historic this practice is though.

The Mother of God of the Sign (Platytera, Znammeniye) icons show Christ Emmanuel surrounded by a radiant circle of Uncreated Light.
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« Reply #112 on: January 18, 2013, 04:25:36 PM »



This image was produced for the purpose of using it as part of an anti-abortion campaign. Icons must never be used to promote social or political causes, even if such causes are good ones. God is above and beyond politics, and to turn a holy image into a sociopolitical mascot is nothing short of shameful.  Angry Angry Angry

Really? Can you document when and where it was first written?
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« Reply #113 on: January 18, 2013, 05:43:45 PM »



This image was produced for the purpose of using it as part of an anti-abortion campaign. Icons must never be used to promote social or political causes, even if such causes are good ones. God is above and beyond politics, and to turn a holy image into a sociopolitical mascot is nothing short of shameful.  Angry Angry Angry

Really? Can you document when and where it was first written?

Read post #109. And the image posted here was painted by Christine Uveges, a Byzantine Catholic, and used in Right to Life marches and campaigns. I have also seen the same composition painted by other artists, and used for the same purpose. The artist herself is on public record with this statement:

Quote
Every year we are in Washington D.C. at the ProLife Rally


And the artist has authorised that copies of this image are handed out during these rallies.

I repeat: the use of iconography to promote sociopolitical causes, even "good" ones, is a shameful debasement of what icons are and stand for.
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« Reply #114 on: January 18, 2013, 06:44:50 PM »

It also has that "photo snap-shot" effect that pseudo-iconography often does.
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« Reply #115 on: January 18, 2013, 07:07:38 PM »

I see nothing wrong with it, it's illustrating something 100% Orthodox and 100% Biblical. Who cares if its used in the campaign against infanticide. Should we also stop those who paint icons of Rachel's Lament?
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« Reply #116 on: January 18, 2013, 07:10:10 PM »

It also has that "photo snap-shot" effect that pseudo-iconography often does.

What do you mean by this? You realize most icons in history aren't "portraits" of Saints like we have so mch of today, they are images from the Bible. The very first Christian images were precisely this sort of thing, a "snapshot" of a Biblical event.
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« Reply #117 on: January 18, 2013, 07:10:49 PM »

I see nothing wrong with it, it's illustrating something 100% Orthodox and 100% Biblical. Who cares if its used in the campaign against infanticide. Should we also stop those who paint icons of Rachel's Lament?

Icons are supposed to be used for veneration.
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« Reply #118 on: January 18, 2013, 07:19:25 PM »

I see nothing wrong with it, it's illustrating something 100% Orthodox and 100% Biblical. Who cares if its used in the campaign against infanticide. Should we also stop those who paint icons of Rachel's Lament?

Icons are supposed to be used for veneration.

You don't and can't "venerate" every icon, we offer them honor and veneration, but unless you are extremely tall, I doubt you can venerate the Pantocrator up in the dome. Wink

I'm simply saying that just because you use an icon in an anti-abortion campaign doesn't make it wrong, should we stop putting photos of icons in books, calendars and cards? Why not take it further and stop people from printing icons on paper? Or stop them from painting on canvas and gluing them to the walls of churches? How far do we take this somewhat extreme legalism regarding icons? Do we take it as far as the Old Believers sometimes do?
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« Reply #119 on: January 18, 2013, 07:36:51 PM »

You don't and can't "venerate" every icon, we offer them honor and veneration, but unless you are extremely tall, I doubt you can venerate the Pantocrator up in the dome. Wink

I've read somewhere there is a difference between icons and icon-like paintings on other objcects like wall or vestments.

Quote
I'm simply saying that just because you use an icon in an anti-abortion campaign doesn't make it wrong,

It was created for that purpose.

Quote
should we stop putting photos of icons in books, calendars and cards?

I'd love that happen.

Quote
Why not take it further and stop people from printing icons on paper? Or stop them from painting on canvas and gluing them to the walls of churches? How far do we take this somewhat extreme legalism regarding icons?

We are not discussing here materials used for icons but icons being used for non-veneration actions, are we?
Quote

Do we take it as far as the Old Believers sometimes do?

What they do?
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« Reply #120 on: January 18, 2013, 08:01:58 PM »

You don't and can't "venerate" every icon, we offer them honor and veneration, but unless you are extremely tall, I doubt you can venerate the Pantocrator up in the dome. Wink

I've read somewhere there is a difference between icons and icon-like paintings on other objcects like wall or vestments.

Quote
I'm simply saying that just because you use an icon in an anti-abortion campaign doesn't make it wrong,

It was created for that purpose.

Quote
should we stop putting photos of icons in books, calendars and cards?

I'd love that happen.

Quote
Why not take it further and stop people from printing icons on paper? Or stop them from painting on canvas and gluing them to the walls of churches? How far do we take this somewhat extreme legalism regarding icons?

We are not discussing here materials used for icons but icons being used for non-veneration actions, are we?
Quote

Do we take it as far as the Old Believers sometimes do?

What they do?

Is there evidence that this icon was created for the anti-infanticide campaign? Why does it matter if it was created for that? It is still an icon, and it created for a holy purpose, to help illustrate the undeniable theology fact that those are human beings in the womb and we are murdering them with abortion. The abortion issue IS a theological issue because those who say a fetus isn't a person are therefore blaspheming Christ.

It's all the same debate, what are icons and what purpose are they for.

The Old Believers take icon "veneration" to near worship and fall into pharisaism an legalism with regard to icons and other aspects of the faith.

I've never read that there is a difference between icons on boards and icons on walls.
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« Reply #121 on: January 18, 2013, 08:03:50 PM »

This is somehow supposed to be the Trinity. I think.




This is 'Holy Silence.' Not exactly sure why it copies some elements of the Virgin of the Sign.




This is, somehow, the Ancient of Days and the Holy Spirit. Maybe. Er....




'Angel Countenance.' Angels are normally depicted as male.  Undecided




'Angel of the Sign.' With all respect, an angel did not give birth to Jesus.  Huh




There were weirder ones. I would like to see a book on unusual icons, if only to show us what is not allowed and what is.

I'm not defending the Icon of Holy Silence as I don't know enough yet about icons so I do not intend to offend anyone or argue. However I watched the DVD "Theoria" which explains its meaning. It is based on the verses from Exodus 23:20 and refers to the Angel of God's Countenance, holding the sphere containing the Logos, the Name, the Word of God. It has to do with the Divine Revelation as it was to Moses, Abraham, and Jacob. Perhaps if anyone is really interested in delving deeper into the meaning of that one he should watch the dvd or contact the school which produced that particular one rather than criticize it right off the bat.

Just because an image, a feast, or anything else has some sort of deeper meaning derived from Scripture or anywhere else does not make it acceptable or traditional.
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« Reply #122 on: January 18, 2013, 08:06:48 PM »



This image was produced for the purpose of using it as part of an anti-abortion campaign. Icons must never be used to promote social or political causes, even if such causes are good ones. God is above and beyond politics, and to turn a holy image into a sociopolitical mascot is nothing short of shameful.  Angry Angry Angry

Are there Orthodox icons of the Visitation? That is, before the feast was added to the Western calendar? IIRC, it was a late addition and never made it on the Eastern calendar, except for the Eastern Catholics.
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« Reply #123 on: January 18, 2013, 08:07:24 PM »

Is there evidence that this icon was created for the anti-infanticide campaign?

Read post #109. And the image posted here was painted by Christine Uveges, a Byzantine Catholic, and used in Right to Life marches and campaigns.

Quote
Why does it matter if it was created for that? It is still an icon, and it created for a holy purpose, to help illustrate the undeniable theology fact that those are human beings in the womb and we are murdering them with abortion. The abortion issue IS a theological issue because those who say a fetus isn't a person are therefore blaspheming Christ.

Political demonstrations are not "a holy purpose".

Quote
I've never read that there is a difference between icons on boards and icons on walls.

Uspyenski wrote about that.
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« Reply #124 on: January 18, 2013, 08:10:37 PM »

1191AD:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Embrace_of_Elizabeth_and_the_Virgin_Mary.jpg
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« Reply #125 on: January 18, 2013, 11:03:08 PM »

1191AD:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Embrace_of_Elizabeth_and_the_Virgin_Mary.jpg

And not a fetus in sight. As is the case with every single icon of this event I've seen, other than the single example I mentioned in post #109. Coincidence? I think not. There is nothing random or accidental in Orthodox tradition. police
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« Reply #126 on: January 18, 2013, 11:06:03 PM »

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Why does it matter if it was created for that? It is still an icon, and it created for a holy purpose, to help illustrate the undeniable theology fact that those are human beings in the womb and we are murdering them with abortion.

This is precisely the reasoning used by Robert Lentz, William Hart McNichols, and their protegees, to justify their "icons".
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« Reply #127 on: January 18, 2013, 11:16:01 PM »

1191AD:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Embrace_of_Elizabeth_and_the_Virgin_Mary.jpg

And not a fetus in sight. As is the case with every single icon of this event I've seen, other than the single example I mentioned in post #109. Coincidence? I think not. There is nothing random or accidental in Orthodox tradition. police

I don't see how some of you think we should absolutely strictly adhere to iconographic depictions. By this, I mean that people seem to think that new types of icons or events that previously weren't depicted, or elements previously foreign to a a particular icon should be anathema.

If this were our attitude, we wouldn't have Rublev's Trinity or many other elements in our iconography. It's a living tradition whose canon is adhered to but can be expanded and evolved and added to.

I could imagine if we were discussing iconography 1800 years ago (with the mindset about icons of some living today) we'd be arguing whether or not the addition of a halo above Christs head was okay, or whether the depiction of Christ with long hair and a beard is okay, or whether the Emperor should be in an image with Christ. It didn't exist in Christian depictions of them before, so it shouldn't be done "now".

That kind of attitude is just silly, our iconographers aren't Amish-like, they are allowed to paint new things (within reason obviously).

Who cares if the fetus was t depicted before? Today we have to battle the heretical belief that you aren't a full human person until your birth. Is that not enough to show Christ was a full human person before his birth? We aren't just combating some regulation that is in favor of infanticide, we are combating heresy and blasphemy.

The prime function of icons isn't just for veneration or as windows to heaven, it is also to teach and show forth the Orthodox faith. Their FIRST function ever was as a teaching tool. We can point to this icon and say that no one can deny the full personhood of a fetus and be free of blasphemy.
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« Reply #128 on: January 18, 2013, 11:19:29 PM »

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Why does it matter if it was created for that? It is still an icon, and it created for a holy purpose, to help illustrate the undeniable theology fact that those are human beings in the womb and we are murdering them with abortion.

This is precisely the reasoning used by Robert Lentz, William Hart McNichols, and their protegees, to justify their "icons".

And you dismiss the argument because a few bad eggs use it? That isn't logical thought or reasoning and shows your argument as being weak.

Some of the most evil human beings to live had some really good points about some things, even points that they used to justify their evil. Should we therefore completely dismiss those points altogether or simply recognize the abuse of the points by ill-intentioned men?

You don't just dismiss something because a few bad guys use it. Even heretics like Nestorius and Arius got a lot of points right even if one or two was terribly wrong.
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« Reply #129 on: January 18, 2013, 11:34:25 PM »

I suppose you haven't argued with LBK about iconography before.
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« Reply #130 on: January 18, 2013, 11:38:48 PM »

It also has that "photo snap-shot" effect that pseudo-iconography often does.

What do you mean by this?
I mean that it looks like it caught figures in a moment of time, carrying some sort of nervous motion into the picture.

An icon, by contrast, is meant to re-capitulate the whole of the event or person depicted, not merely a snapshot of a particular second in time.
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« Reply #131 on: January 19, 2013, 03:39:05 AM »


I don't see how some of you think we should absolutely strictly adhere to iconographic depictions. By this, I mean that people seem to think that new types of icons or events that previously weren't depicted, or elements previously foreign to a a particular icon should be anathema.

On the contrary:






Note the Chinese architecture in the icon of the Martyrs of the Boxer Rebellion and in the life icon of St John of Shanghai and San Francisco. Note also in St John's icon the Capitol building in Washington DC, and a street with cars, representing the Paris street where St John once served a panikhida in memory of an Serbian archhduke who had been assassinated there, an act representative of his foolishness for Christ. The Capitol represents St John's traveling to Washington to petition the American government to allow his flock, stranded on Tubabao in the Philippines after escaping Shanghai in 1949, to emigrate to the US. All are perfectly proper elements in their respective icons.

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If this were our attitude, we wouldn't have Rublev's Trinity or many other elements in our iconography. It's a living tradition whose canon is adhered to but can be expanded and evolved and added to.

See above.

The Holy Trinity icon that St Andrei of Radonezh (Andrei Rublyev) painted was based on the already ancient icon composition of the Hospitality of Abraham. St Andrei's icon is a distillation of the theology of the events at the Oak of Mamre. It is as profound an expression of Trinitarian theology as any theological treatise, and it is all there, in a single painted panel.

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Who cares if the fetus was t depicted before? Today we have to battle the heretical belief that you aren't a full human person until your birth. Is that not enough to show Christ was a full human person before his birth? We aren't just combating some regulation that is in favor of infanticide, we are combating heresy and blasphemy.

The meaning behind proper icons of the Visitation is the recognition of both St Elizabeth and the unborn Forerunner of the unborn Child of the Virgin as their Lord and their God, something proclaimed, and frequently so, in scripture and in hymnography, the latter which truly expresses the Orthodox consensus patrum.

Moreover, there is only a single historical (12thC) icon of the Annunciation which shoes the unborn Christ, and, even then, the Child is shown over his Mother's body not enclosed in the womb, but in a manner similar to Of the Sign icons, minus the mandorla of Uncreated Light. Again, hymnographers in every Orthodox culture, some of them saints, have consistently omitted any depiction of an unborn Christ.

Attempting to associate this imagery with anti-abortion campaigns has no scriptural or liturgical basis. Icons are not political playthings.

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Their FIRST function ever was as a teaching tool.

Not quite. The first icon was the Mandylion (Not Made By Hands), and its purpose was to mediate the miraculous healing of King Abgar. Christ could not travel to Edessa to personally heal the king, so He sent the image of His face imprinted on cloth in His stead. The holiness of an icon is derived from its association with the prototype.This is the first and foremost iconographic principle which not only permits their painting and veneration, but also insists on their veneration. All else flows from this.

This action also proclaims the Incarnation, that fallen matter has been redeemed through Christ's death and resurrection.

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We can point to this icon and say that no one can deny the full personhood of a fetus and be free of blasphemy.

No, we cannot. This image, painted by Christine Uveges (who is not even Orthodox) and others like her, was created as a vehicle for the promotion of pro-life causes. This cannot be denied. And, in doing so, this image ceases to be an icon, and becomes a sociopolitical tool, a mascot for the cause.
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« Reply #132 on: January 19, 2013, 03:49:08 AM »

And you dismiss the argument because a few bad eggs use it? That isn't logical thought or reasoning and shows your argument as being weak.

You may wish to reacquaint yourself with this thread:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,44810.0/all.html

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Some of the most evil human beings to live had some really good points about some things, even points that they used to justify their evil. Should we therefore completely dismiss those points altogether or simply recognize the abuse of the points by ill-intentioned men?

For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness? (2 Cor. 6:14)

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You don't just dismiss something because a few bad guys use it. Even heretics like Nestorius and Arius got a lot of points right even if one or two was terribly wrong.

While God Himself will ultimately judge their souls, the Church, through her sainted bishops, including St Nicholas of Myra, has decreed that both were heretics deserving of anathema. Good enough for me.
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« Reply #133 on: January 19, 2013, 05:05:08 AM »

LBK, you don't really offer any real rational arguments here. Instead of trying to base your argument on rejection of these icons based on YOUR expectations of what an icon is, maybe you ought to step back and look at it historically.

Firstly, the story about the image of Christ being sent to King Abgar is indeed as you say, but you are forgetting about the history of this story. The story itself, of the king sending an emissary to Christ dates back to the Fourth Century. However, in all the accounts that record his interaction with Christ, no image is mentioned until the 5th Century when it wasn't a miraculous image but a painting by a court artist. The story that Christ himself made the image didn't come about until about the 7th Century. So there may have been an image, but it probably wasn't made by Christ himself.

Also, then you may point to St Luke (my patron), but again, while a nice tradition that can teach us something, it is somewhat unlikely. He probably could not have painted an image of Mary and Christ when he was a child. This just doesn't add up, especially since he lived pretty far away when Christ was young. Also, the icon(s) that were reported to be this image are all far too recent, and they could be argued to be as copies, but not stylistically since the style we see today really didn't arise until the era between 1100 and 1400.

I also am a bit wrong about the first images being to teach, this became a function of icons, however the first function of Christian iconography was communication and simple depiction of Biblical events. It's a known historical fact that our idea of the "Icon" and its veneration didn't arise until the mid hundreds. The first images weren't venerated as those of today or treated in the same manner, though they are still considered iconography. They form the very basis of what icons have become. Yet to absolutely ignore the facts and refuse to see how much it has changed and evolved over time and insist on static uniformity and absolute legalistic conformity is to completely ignore the real history of it.

And why is the Byzantine style so prominent? The same reasons the liturgy of St John is. Because of the Byzantine synthesis and the power and influence the Greeks had over the whole Eastern Orthodox Church from Chalcedonian Alexandria to Russia. It's a wonderful tradition but it is not the only one and is not the only way.

Also, our iconography has evolved and changed profoundly over the centuries, just like our Liturgy, and to ignore this is to willingly be in ignorance about ones own Church and to do a great disservice to those who paint icons and work within that tradition.

As I told you LBK, the abortion debate is not a political debate, it's theological. You MUST recognize this, because Christ MUST have been a human person from his conception. Therefore it is right and venerable for us to depict Christ, not just as an adult, but as a fetus as well, because he was the incarnate Word of God made flesh.
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« Reply #134 on: January 19, 2013, 08:24:56 AM »

I also am a bit wrong about the first images being to teach, this became a function of icons, however the first function of Christian iconography was communication and simple depiction of Biblical events.

I see some Protestant theories here.
y
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As I told you LBK, the abortion debate is not a political debate, it's theological. You MUST recognize this, because Christ MUST have been a human person from his conception. Therefore it is right and venerable for us to depict Christ, not just as an adult, but as a fetus as well, because he was the incarnate Word of God made flesh.

OK, He must. Does that mean is it necessary to put Him on political banners? Don't think so.
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