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Author Topic: Cardinal Sees Long Road Ahead With Greek Orthodox  (Read 1066 times) Average Rating: 0
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« on: February 26, 2009, 09:44:15 PM »


Cardinal Sees Long Road Ahead With Greek Orthodox

Unity-Council Leader Says Everything Can't be Resolved in 1 Day

VATICAN CITY, FEB. 26, 2009 (Zenit.org).- The cardinal in charge of Vatican efforts to seek Christian unity expressed satisfaction at a meeting with a Greek Orthodox leader, even though he recognized that the path to full unity with that Church is still long.

Cardinal Walter Kasper, president of the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, expressed this to Vatican Radio after his visit this week to Ieronymos II, leader of the Greek Orthodox Church. The cardinal and archbishop had not met personally.

The Holy Synod of the Greek Orthodox Church elected Metropolitan Ieronymos of Thebes and Livadia a year ago to succeed Archbishop Christodoulos of Athens and All Greece, who died in January of 2008.

"I wanted to meet him and wanted to continue with the dialogue currently in progress," the cardinal said. "He is a truly humble and modest man. Our meeting has certainly been a beautiful one, and also those with his collaborators."

The cardinal said his conversations with the Greek Orthodox archbishop centered on practical issues, "since theological dialogue is carried out together with all the Orthodox Churches."

He explained: "In all the European countries, the same challenges show up, such as immigration -- which is very strong -- or the economic crisis. In this realm, there can be collaboration. They are very interested in learning from our experience and this is very important."

Cardinal Kasper particularly noted the situation of minority Latin-rite Catholics and Greek Catholics, whose number is growing due to immigration. "Now they are being taken into account. Up to now, this had not been the case on the part of the Orthodox Church. I have asked them not to ignore [the Catholics] and they have promised me this."

Resistance

Regarding ecumenical dialogue under way, the Vatican official noted that there is still a lot of "resistance" with the Greek Orthodox.

"The Church of Greece has a long and rich tradition, but they still have bad memories of the past, in particular in that which pertains to the Crusades," he explained.

Cardinal Kasper contended that Pope John Paul II's gesture in asking forgiveness for the abuses committed during the Crusades was "very important." But, he continued, despite that, "there is still a strong resistance toward an ecumenical growing closer and because of that our steps must be prudent."

"With the new archbishop and with his collaborators, we want to continue taking these steps," he said, adding that in this regard he was content with his visit. "I did not have very high expectations: It would not be possible to resolve every problem in just one day, but it was important to establish personal contact."

Ieronymos II's predecessor, Christodoulos, was the archbishop that received John Paul II during the Pontiff's historical visit to Greece in 2000.

Benedict XVI described Christodoulos in his message of condolence at the archbishop's death as the artisan of a "new era of cordial cooperation" between the two Churches.

The archbishop was supported in this effort by other Greek Orthodox prelates, including Ieronymos himself.
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2009, 12:42:33 PM »

Long road indeed. I don't think our paths will converge this side of heaven.
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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2009, 01:24:58 PM »

Regarding ecumenical dialogue under way, the Vatican official noted that there is still a lot of "resistance" with the Greek Orthodox.

Methinks the article's author majored in understatement.

Long road indeed. I don't think our paths will converge this side of heaven.

If we are both as intractable as we claim we are, then I fear you are right.  But that comes from my perspective, where the Orthodox should be intractable, and the Roman Catholics negotiable.
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2009, 05:42:00 PM »



If we are both as intractable as we claim we are, then I fear you are right.  But that comes from my perspective, where the Orthodox should be intractable, and the Roman Catholics negotiable.
My opinion is exactly the same except the words "Orthodox" and "Catholic" would trade places. I think that the best thing we can probably do for eachother here on earth is to pray for and with eachother, work together for social justice and Christian values, and remember that we have a common Father in heaven. We may be separated (and I do not espouse branch theory) but we are still family.
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« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2009, 06:09:11 PM »

Here are my mother and my brothers. For whoever does the will of my heavenly Father is my brother, and sister, and mother. ~ Matthew 13:49b

If we spent half the time "doing" God's Will instead of engaging in these dogmatic pursuits there would be unity among the People of God already.

Jesus, Mary and Joseph have mercy on us.
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St Basil the Great (330-379 A.D.): “I think then that the one goal of all who are really and truly serving the Lord ought to be to bring back to union the churches who have at different times and in diverse manners divided from one another.”
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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2009, 06:44:41 PM »

Here are my mother and my brothers. For whoever does the will of my heavenly Father is my brother, and sister, and mother. ~ Matthew 13:49b

If we spent half the time "doing" God's Will instead of engaging in these dogmatic pursuits there would be unity among the People of God already.

Jesus, Mary and Joseph have mercy on us.
Wow. I feel I need to take the correction to heart.
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« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2009, 07:04:05 PM »

If we are both as intractable as we claim we are, then I fear you are right.  But that comes from my perspective, where the Orthodox should be intractable, and the Roman Catholics negotiable.

Thomas Merton expressed his conviction that unity between the Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches will be brought about by the prayers of the All-Holy Mother of God and by the monks of both Churches.

Merton (may he rest in peace) was well aware of the intransigence of Orthodox monks (particularly the Greek monks on Mount Athos) and so he was setting a high bar with regards to purity of doctrine.

I wonder if his prophecy will turn out to be correct?
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« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2009, 08:24:40 PM »

Quote
VATICAN CITY, FEB. 26, 2009 (Zenit.org).- The cardinal in charge of Vatican efforts to seek Christian unity expressed satisfaction at a meeting with a Greek Orthodox leader, even though he recognized that the path to full unity with that Church is still long.
As long as a piece of string  Grin
Quote
"The Church of Greece has a long and rich tradition, but they still have bad memories of the past, in particular in that which pertains to the Crusades," he explained.
Its funny, in all the years I lived in Greece I never heard mention of the crusades whenever the subject of Catholics came up. Never.

John
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