OrthodoxChristianity.net
December 20, 2014, 01:30:13 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: « 1 2 3  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Why don't Protestants celebrate more religious holidays?  (Read 23466 times) Average Rating: 0
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,847


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #90 on: February 04, 2010, 12:30:15 PM »

you would agree that so-called "ritualism" and "minimalism" are equally neutral, so to speak?

Hmm... I'd have to think about that one. I'm not sure that two neutralities can be equal, as neutrality is, surely, the absence of something. Can two people be other than equally absent from church one Sunday? Also, I have never been to a 'ritualist' church for more than the occasional one-off visit, whereas I was sent to Methodist Sunday School as a child, and have attended church ever since I left there. I'm not the one to make an assessment or first-hand comparison. Obviously Protestants think there is more risk of entrapment in ritual (as explained in an earlier post of mine) than in an absence of ritual, but whether that's right or not would need to be judged by someone who's spent years in both, and indeed years as a sincere worshipper, not being dragged along reluctantly to one, and going by choice to the other.
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,847


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #91 on: February 04, 2010, 12:33:42 PM »

I'm certainly not trying to suggest that civil holidays should not be celebrated, but why do they get the priority among many Protestants to the (near) exclusion of Christian holidays?

Excellent point. Why is that?

Excellent point. Why is that?  I've never noticed it till you pointed it out here. We do of course mark Easter and Christmas, but we also have Remembrance Sunday and Mothers' Day, though not any others than immediately come to mind, unless you include Harvest (which is OT though not NT).
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
katherineofdixie
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 3,485



« Reply #92 on: February 04, 2010, 01:17:23 PM »

I'm certainly not trying to suggest that civil holidays should not be celebrated, but why do they get the priority among many Protestants to the (near) exclusion of Christian holidays?

Excellent point. Why is that?

Excellent point. Why is that?  I've never noticed it till you pointed it out here. We do of course mark Easter and Christmas, but we also have Remembrance Sunday and Mothers' Day, though not any others than immediately come to mind, unless you include Harvest (which is OT though not NT).

I have a sneaking suspicion that this anomaly, as well as the almost kneejerk horror of any hint of "ritualism," has more to do with anti-Roman Catholicism than anything else. Of course, I'm basing my opinion on my experience of Baptists and Evangelicals in the American South. The English variety may be (and probably is) a different kettle of fish altogether.
Logged

"If but ten of us lead a holy life, we shall kindle a fire which shall light up the entire city."

 St. John Chrysostom
HandmaidenofGod
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA (Ecumenical Patriarch)
Posts: 3,397


O Holy St. Demetrius pray to God for us!


« Reply #93 on: February 04, 2010, 02:57:53 PM »

you would agree that so-called "ritualism" and "minimalism" are equally neutral, so to speak?

Hmm... I'd have to think about that one. I'm not sure that two neutralities can be equal, as neutrality is, surely, the absence of something. Can two people be other than equally absent from church one Sunday? Also, I have never been to a 'ritualist' church for more than the occasional one-off visit, whereas I was sent to Methodist Sunday School as a child, and have attended church ever since I left there. I'm not the one to make an assessment or first-hand comparison. Obviously Protestants think there is more risk of entrapment in ritual (as explained in an earlier post of mine) than in an absence of ritual, but whether that's right or not would need to be judged by someone who's spent years in both, and indeed years as a sincere worshipper, not being dragged along reluctantly to one, and going by choice to the other.

Frankly I think the entire point is moot.

If someone is a Faithful follower of Christ, they are a faithful follower of Christ not because of the ritual or lack thereof, but because they love Christ.

Those on this forum who have converted from Protestantism to Orthodoxy didn't do so because they woke up one morning and said, "Ya know, I need more ritual in my life." They did so because they loved Christ and sought out His True Church. For some, they walked into Church, saw the burning candles, smelled the incense, and fell in love with the ritual. For others, it took time to accept and adapt. At any rate, in the end, they converted because they loved Christ and His Church.

You keep on saying that your Church doesn't include ritual for fear that people would just fall into the trap of doing the same ol' thing over and over, and would lose their zeal for Christ.

I want you to think for a second about someone in your church that is really "on fire" for God. Someone you know who's faith runs deep like a river, and has held fast to their faith through good times and through bad. Do you really think a few candles, some icons, and some incense would change this person's faith? Do you really think it would be a wet blanket on the fire of their faith?

My point is that both of our church's have people that are, what I like to call "Prayer Warrior's for God," and people who are just there because, well, they just are. I don't think ritual or lack thereof makes a person more on fire for God; I believe it's a personal choice. You are either going to hold fast to your faith because you believe in it, or you don't. It's that simple.
Logged

"For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope." Jer 29:11
katherineofdixie
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 3,485



« Reply #94 on: February 04, 2010, 03:20:59 PM »

Those on this forum who have converted from Protestantism to Orthodoxy didn't do so because they woke up one morning and said, "Ya know, I need more ritual in my life." They did so because they loved Christ and sought out His True Church.
LOL! Or, in my case, were dragged almost against their will into the True Church!

Quote
You keep on saying that your Church doesn't include ritual for fear that people would just fall into the trap of doing the same ol' thing over and over, and would lose their zeal for Christ.
And, be honest, david, the Baptist and Evangelical churches certainly have their rituals and traditions - they just don't call them that.

Quote
people who are just there because, well, they just are.
And even those people who just seem to be taking up space are in church worshipping God, in whatever way. They certainly have many other ways to spend their Sunday mornings. We don't know what is in their hearts.
Logged

"If but ten of us lead a holy life, we shall kindle a fire which shall light up the entire city."

 St. John Chrysostom
Papist
Patriarch of Pontification
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic
Jurisdiction: Byzantine
Posts: 12,417


Praying for the Christians in Iraq


« Reply #95 on: February 04, 2010, 03:43:00 PM »


And, be honest, david, the Baptist and Evangelical churches certainly have their rituals and traditions - they just don't call them that.


I have always found it funny that they attack liturgical Christians on the ground that our prayers are repetative when they all have hymns and songs that they sing over and over again.
Logged

You are right. I apologize for having sacked Constantinople. I really need to stop doing that.
Cymbyz
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America
Posts: 496



« Reply #96 on: February 04, 2010, 05:45:06 PM »

to get back on topic:  some Protestants are antifestalists:  they believe that, because the Bible doesn't mandate most of the celebrations and feasts that have become established church tradition, they should celebrate nothing.
Logged

The end of the world
is as near as the day of your death;
watch and pray.
 
 Yahoo! & WLM ID: Owen
Alveus Lacuna
Warned
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Posts: 6,965



« Reply #97 on: February 04, 2010, 05:51:41 PM »

The reason the full calendar of holy days has been replaced by secular holidays is because when a branch falls off of the Tree, it rots and dies.
Logged
Cleopas
Bible Thumping, Tongue Talking, Faith Walking Christian
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: Charismatic Evangelical
Posts: 445


If I'm my own Pope then I claim infalliablity. Ha!

perfecthart
WWW
« Reply #98 on: February 04, 2010, 06:25:52 PM »

I must say I found it strange, even when I was a Protestant, that my church would celebrate at least in some way Mothers' Day, Fathers' Day, Canada Day, Thanksgiving Day (like in US established by a secular government back in the days when there was general respect for Christianity), Remembrance Day (Veterans' Day, Armistice Day elsewhere), New Year's Day (civil, of course). Yet there was never any mention of Theophany/Epiphany, Ascension, Transfiguration, Presentation of the Lord, Annunciation, etc. even though these commemorate events recorded in the Bible!
The civil holidays filled the vacuum created by the elimination of the church calendar. There seems to be something inherent in human society that makes us want to celebrate.
I'm certainly not trying to suggest that civil holidays should not be celebrated, but why do they get the priority among many Protestants to the (near) exclusion of Christian holidays?

Probably because we typically do not recognize the authority of your church, or of any similar festival based church models. We do recognize the authority of Scripture, and naturally gravitate toward the inferences about specific commemorations, feasts, and ordinances noted therein. We also recognize the authority of our respective national/state governments in the surrounding culture and society; not in any binding way on the church, and we naturally celebrate use such as is common to our culture (without being sinful) in and for the cause of Christ.

Plus, we do not feel a need for festivals, nor eucharistic observances, to enjoy the presence of the Lord, as we do so in the person of the indwelling Spirit both in our hearts and daily lives, and regularly as a corporate body of believers in our worship gatherings and observances of the ordinances, etc. Indeed, Christ has promised he would never leave or forsake us, and further that were two or three are gathered together in His name He is in our midst.
Logged

Cleopas
Christopher Hart

"Every one, though born of God in an instant, yet undoubtedly grows by slow degrees” -- John Wesley
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,847


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #99 on: February 04, 2010, 06:26:03 PM »

this anomaly, as well as the almost kneejerk horror of any hint of "ritualism," has more to do with anti-Roman Catholicism than anything else.

I think to a large extent you're right; and of course, they haven't encountered Orthodoxy anyway, so they have no reaction for or against it. When they do encounter it, it looks like Catholicism, so they transfer their ideas about Catholicism en masse to Orthodoxy. This doesn't of course address the question of whether those ideas are right or wrong, only why they are probably specifically anti-Catholic and not in essence anti-Orthodox.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2010, 06:26:28 PM by David Young » Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,847


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #100 on: February 04, 2010, 06:28:16 PM »

they believe that, because the Bible doesn't mandate most of the celebrations and feasts that have become established church tradition, they should celebrate nothing.

Which, as I've said before, they call "the regulative principle".
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,847


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #101 on: February 04, 2010, 06:32:16 PM »

If someone is a Faithful follower of Christ, they are a faithful follower of Christ not because of the ritual or lack thereof, but because they love Christ.

think for a second about someone in your church that is really "on fire" for God... who's faith runs deep like a river, and has held fast to their faith through good times and through bad. Do you really think a few candles, some icons, and some incense would change this person's faith? Do you really think it would be a wet blanket on the fire of their faith?

My point is that both of our church's have people that are, what I like to call "Prayer Warriors for God," ... I don't think ritual or lack thereof makes a person more on fire for God

I think I agree with all of this.
Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
David Young
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Baptist
Jurisdiction: local church, Wrexham, Wales
Posts: 1,847


2012, Presbyterian chapel, Nantyr


« Reply #102 on: February 04, 2010, 06:44:01 PM »

Baptist and Evangelical churches certainly have their rituals and traditions ... they all have hymns and songs that they sing over and over again

And more besides. There are churches which in principle practise open worship - that is, the service contains an extended time in which anyone may stand up and share some thoughts from the scriptures or lead in extemporary prayer. But in reality, you know who is going to stand up, and what he is going to say, because he has got (or gotten, if he's American) into the habit of saying the same things every week.

For myself, entirely personally and probably as a matter of taste not principle, I would prefer a more balanced mixture of both than is found (I think) in either your churches or ours. In ours I should like more liturgy - more set prayers prayed aloud in unison, more use of ancient, time-honoured prayers from the centuries of Christian worship. But I also cherish the possibility and practice of spontaneity, freedom and openness. This is why I enjoy worshipping with the 1662 Book of Common Prayer at an Anglican church if I get the opportunity when I am away on holiday; but equally - nay, even more - I rejoice when I am leading a Communion service at our Baptist church, include a time of spontaneous prayer open to all prior to the taking of the bread and the fruit of the vine, and people lead us one by one in an ex tempore manner, expressing their gratitude and appreciation to God for things the Lord's Supper points us to. Give me both - not either/or.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2010, 06:45:01 PM by David Young » Logged

"But if you bite and devour one another, take heed that you are not consumed by one another." Galatians 5.15
ialmisry
There's nothing John of Damascus can't answer
Moderated
Hypatos
*****************
Offline Offline

Faith: جامعي Arab confesssing the Orthodox Faith of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church
Jurisdiction: Antioch (for now), but my heart belongs to Alexandria
Posts: 38,142



« Reply #103 on: February 04, 2010, 08:23:21 PM »

Probably because we typically do not recognize the authority of your church, or of any similar festival based church models. We do recognize the authority of Scripture, and naturally gravitate toward the inferences about specific commemorations, feasts, and ordinances noted therein. We also recognize the authority of our respective national/state governments in the surrounding culture and society; not in any binding way on the church, and we naturally celebrate use such as is common to our culture (without being sinful) in and for the cause of Christ.

Plus, we do not feel a need for festivals, nor eucharistic observances, to enjoy the presence of the Lord, as we do so in the person of the indwelling Spirit both in our hearts and daily lives, and regularly as a corporate body of believers in our worship gatherings and observances of the ordinances, etc. Indeed, Christ has promised he would never leave or forsake us, and further that were two or three are gathered together in His name He is in our midst.

"Two or three of you."  "He who receives you, receives Me...he who rejectes You, rejects Me....."  One has to first receive Apostles to be in on that two-or-three gathered deal.

The boldfaced makes this interchange rather perplexing:
I understand what you are saying, however, since Scripture "cannot be broken" (John 10:35) any view thereof that causes the gospels (or any other book of Scripture) to disagree, rather than to harmonize, must be a false view or understanding. Besides, Paul is quite clear on the nature of the bread we are to use at the Lords table, and why (1 Corinthians 5:8).

"Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth." 1 Corinthians 5:8

As to the metaphorical nature of Paul's use of the phrase, again, the metaphor makes NO SENSE unless the basis is real, or in this case literal. Associations to Passover, keeping the feast, and eating unleavened bread must refer to the literal observance and use of such in order for any extrapolation Paul intends to hold. Else Paul is nonsensical here (as if Roll Eyes).

Rather odd that you are so dogmatic about that, as most Radical Protestants (as in Radical Reformation), hold that observances of feast days were abolished.  So you hold that celebrating Easter is required by the NT?  That passover has given over to Pascha?  As Hebrews shows, the Law has been changed.  And what of all the admonitions of St. Paul to "purge out the old leaven that you may be a new lump.

Quote
Besides, a cursory familiarity with Jewish festival customs

As they are celebrated now: it never ceases to amaze me how Protestants, who won't accept the Tradition of the Church, take the traditions that the present days Jews preserve from the pharisees as the Gospel truth, whether it be their preference of the late Masoretic text (fixed Nearly a millenium after the Church's Septuagint), or the preference of the Talmud's interpretation over the Fathers of the Church.

He is the Paschal lamb, not the paschal bread.

Per Paul, He is both.

1 Corinthians 5:7-8
Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.

What feast are we keeping? Passover. Who is our lamb? Christ. Who is our bread? Christ. What is the bread? Christ's body, which He sacrificed for us. How then since Christ lived a sinless life in the body, and Paul says we are to keep the feast with unleavened bread, can one partake of Christ as the Passover and do so in the form of leavened bread?

Indeed, the unleavened passover bread holds special symbolism that further drives home this apostolic comparison and injunction. The bread is striped, as Christ was for our healing. The bread is pierced, as Christ was when he shed forth the fount of eternal life. The bread is broken as our Lord explained when he gave it to His disciples at the last supper. Beautiful!



Quote
And even if St. Paul meant unleavened bread, he can be pre-empted:

Not without "breaking" Scripture (which is an impossibility, proving the absurdity of any position staked on such a handling of the word).
Logged

Question a friend, perhaps he did not do it; but if he did anything so that he may do it no more.
A hasty quarrel kindles fire,
and urgent strife sheds blood.
If you blow on a spark, it will glow;
if you spit on it, it will be put out;
                           and both come out of your mouth
Papist
Patriarch of Pontification
Toumarches
************
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic
Jurisdiction: Byzantine
Posts: 12,417


Praying for the Christians in Iraq


« Reply #104 on: February 04, 2010, 08:36:27 PM »

Baptist and Evangelical churches certainly have their rituals and traditions ... they all have hymns and songs that they sing over and over again

And more besides. There are churches which in principle practise open worship - that is, the service contains an extended time in which anyone may stand up and share some thoughts from the scriptures or lead in extemporary prayer. But in reality, you know who is going to stand up, and what he is going to say, because he has got (or gotten, if he's American) into the habit of saying the same things every week.

For myself, entirely personally and probably as a matter of taste not principle, I would prefer a more balanced mixture of both than is found (I think) in either your churches or ours. In ours I should like more liturgy - more set prayers prayed aloud in unison, more use of ancient, time-honoured prayers from the centuries of Christian worship. But I also cherish the possibility and practice of spontaneity, freedom and openness. This is why I enjoy worshipping with the 1662 Book of Common Prayer at an Anglican church if I get the opportunity when I am away on holiday; but equally - nay, even more - I rejoice when I am leading a Communion service at our Baptist church, include a time of spontaneous prayer open to all prior to the taking of the bread and the fruit of the vine, and people lead us one by one in an ex tempore manner, expressing their gratitude and appreciation to God for things the Lord's Supper points us to. Give me both - not either/or.

I know as a Catholic I appreciated a solemn Liturgy. However, I also appreciate prayers meetings outside of the Liturgy that are more spontaneous.
Logged

You are right. I apologize for having sacked Constantinople. I really need to stop doing that.
Melodist
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: The Faith That Established The Universe
Jurisdiction: AOANA
Posts: 2,523



« Reply #105 on: February 05, 2010, 12:01:59 AM »

this anomaly, as well as the almost kneejerk horror of any hint of "ritualism," has more to do with anti-Roman Catholicism than anything else.

I think to a large extent you're right; and of course, they haven't encountered Orthodoxy anyway, so they have no reaction for or against it. When they do encounter it, it looks like Catholicism, so they transfer their ideas about Catholicism en masse to Orthodoxy. This doesn't of course address the question of whether those ideas are right or wrong, only why they are probably specifically anti-Catholic and not in essence anti-Orthodox.

You definitely have a point. Someone once "corrected" me and told me that "The Pope is not infallible!" in a conversation. Fortunately, most of my friends know that Orthodoxy is not Roman Catholicism. Even if they don't what the differences are, they don't assume that what applies to one necessarily applies to the other.
Logged

And FWIW, these are our Fathers too, you know.

Made Perfect in Weakness - Latest Post: The Son of God
fleur-de-lys
Chestertonian
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Posts: 80



« Reply #106 on: February 05, 2010, 01:10:08 AM »

I just asked my Presbyterian friend about that. She replied, "Isn't every Sunday a celebration of Christ?" I suppose the logic is that this makes specific holidays superfluous. Her church doesn't even really celebrate Christmas or Easter.

We could extend the logic farther and say that every day should be a celebration of Christ, but theory doesn't often live up to reality. Yes, every day should be, but one day in particular should be more intently and intensely focused on that celebration. Something to keep us in mind of the rest we have every day in Christ. And I see nothing wrong with making one of those particularly-focused days even more particularly focused. For instance, her church doesn't celebrate the sacrament of communion every Sunday - not as a religious rule, but just the way her church's means extend. So it has that aura of 'specialness' when they do.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2010, 01:22:20 AM by fleur-de-lys » Logged

Between us, by the peace of God, such truth can now be told;

Yea, there is strength in striking root, and good in growing old.
augustin717
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: The other ROC
Posts: 5,636



« Reply #107 on: February 05, 2010, 02:20:07 AM »

In orthodox countries I would say that most Protestants keep and have in their calendars most of the 12 royal feasts.
Logged
HandmaidenofGod
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA (Ecumenical Patriarch)
Posts: 3,397


O Holy St. Demetrius pray to God for us!


« Reply #108 on: February 05, 2010, 09:30:34 AM »

I just asked my Presbyterian friend about that. She replied, "Isn't every Sunday a celebration of Christ?" I suppose the logic is that this makes specific holidays superfluous. Her church doesn't even really celebrate Christmas or Easter.

My response to that would be "Of course, however the different feasts of the Church remind us how specific events in Christ's life play a role in our salvation."

The gravity of the Logos taking on flesh is too great for my finite mind to comprehend in its entirety all the time (or ever, to be honest.) The feasts of the Church help me "break it down" into digestable pieces. There is never a time when the Church does not celebrate Christ; it's just that the Church uses the various feasts and fasts to help us better understand Christ's life and how it shapes our lives today.

Also, speaking simply from my own personal experience, I noticed that when I came back to the Church and begin intently observing the Church calander, I enjoyed the seasons of the year more. The darkness of winter is illumined by the Light of the World at Christmas. January isn't so bleak as we observe the feast of Theophany. How much more meaning does the rebirth of creation carry in Spring, when we celebrate the restoration with it's Creator at Pascha?

Every day of the year has a purpose assigned to it, whether it be feast or fast. It reminds me every day that there is more to this life than what I may see in front of me.

I find it very encouraging.

Well, that's enough for now.
Logged

"For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope." Jer 29:11
Rosehip
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Posts: 2,760



« Reply #109 on: February 05, 2010, 11:39:29 AM »

In orthodox countries I would say that most Protestants keep and have in their calendars most of the 12 royal feasts.

This is very true. I know, for instance, that at least the more traditional elements of the Evangelical Baptist Church of those countries, celebrated Bright Week (the week following Pascha) by attending church nearly every day of that week, and by singing together triumphantly the Orthodox Paschal Troparion (Christ is Risen/From the dead). At Nativity too, they sang many of their own, but also standard hymns sung in the Orthodox Church at that Feast.  Likewise, they had church services on many of the lesser-known Orthodox feast days. These feast days were pretty huge events for them. Of course, they were much stricter than most American Baptists in that the married women covered their head with scarves in church, and dressed modestly. They did not partipate in war and were quite persecuted by the communists and barred from advancing their education during those days. They also were not traditionally Calvinists. Some succumbed to that heresy after being indoctrinated by visiting American Baptist missionaries, sadly.

« Last Edit: February 05, 2010, 11:44:22 AM by Rosehip » Logged

+ Our dear sister Martha (Rosehip) passed away on Dec 20, 2010.  May her memory be eternal! +
Liz
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Church of England
Posts: 989



« Reply #110 on: February 07, 2010, 03:01:38 PM »

In tonight's Bible Study, Father mentioned how each of the 12 feasts we celebrate on the Liturgical calander are on the calander to remind us of how each part of Christ's life plays a role in our salvation.

This reminded me of a question I've always had, even in my days in the Baptist church.

Why does the Protestant church water down the Liturgical calander to Christmas and Easter?

While I understand your reasoning for throwing out the days that honor the Saints and the Theotokos, why throw out the days that honor Christ?

Specifically I am referring to Theophany (Christ's Baptism) (Luke 3:21-22), the Feast of the Presentation of Christ in the Temple (Luke 1:22-24), Transfiguration (Mark 1:1-13), Palm Sunday (John 12:13-15) and the rest of Holy Week, Pentacost (Acts 2:3-5), and Ascension (Acts 1:9-11).

All of these events are recorded in the Bible, and are worthy of our praise. On Christmas and Easter you celebrate what Christ did for your salvation; why not include the other dates in the year?



We celebrate all the above feasts.
Logged
ytterbiumanalyst
Professor Emeritus, CSA
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Faith: Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA Diocese of the Midwest
Posts: 8,790



« Reply #111 on: February 10, 2010, 07:49:09 PM »

The discussion on the authority of Scripture has been split to the following thread:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,25879.0.html

The discussion on Agape love and non-Orthodox Christians has been split to the following thread:

http://www.orthodoxchristianity.net/forum/index.php/topic,25885.0.html

--YtterbiumAnalyst
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 07:55:40 PM by ytterbiumanalyst » Logged

"It is remarkable that what we call the world...in what professes to be true...will allow in one man no blemishes, and in another no virtue."--Charles Dickens
Tags:
Pages: « 1 2 3  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.102 seconds with 49 queries.