OrthodoxChristianity.net
July 31, 2014, 12:11:20 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Reminder: No political discussions in the public fora.  If you do not have access to the private Politics Forum, please send a PM to Fr. George.
 
   Home   Help Calendar Contact Treasury Tags Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Getting started with a daily prayer rule  (Read 19918 times) Average Rating: 5
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
Irish Hermit
Kibernetski Kaludjer
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,991


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us


« on: February 01, 2009, 06:52:30 AM »

Helpful Information for
Keeping a Prayer Rule


By St. Theophan the Recluse

You ask about a prayer rule. Yes, it is
good to have a prayer rule on account of
our weakness so that on the one hand we
do not give in to laziness, and on the
other hand we restrain our enthusiasm to
its proper measure. The greatest
practitioners of prayer kept a prayer rule.
They would always begin with established
prayers, and if during the course of these
a prayer started on its own, they would
put aside the others and pray that prayer.
If this is what the great practitioners of
prayer did, all the more reason for us to do so. Without established prayers, we would not
know how to pray at all. Without them, we would be left entirely without prayer.
However, one does not have to do many prayers. It is better to perform a small number of
prayers properly than to hurry through a large number of prayers, because it is difficult to
maintain the heat of prayerful zeal when they are performed to excess.

I would consider the morning and evening prayers as set out in the prayer books to be entirely
sufficient for you. Just try each time to carry them out with full attention and corresponding
feelings. To be more successful at this, spend a little of your free time at reading over all the
prayers separately. Think them over and feel them, so that when you recite them at your
prayer rule, you will know the holy thoughts and feelings that are contained in them. Prayer
does not mean that we just recite prayers, but that we assimilate their content within
ourselves, and pronounce them as if they came from our minds and hearts.


continued....
Logged
Irish Hermit
Kibernetski Kaludjer
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,991


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us


« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2009, 06:55:36 AM »



After you have considered and felt the prayers, work at memorizing them. Then you will not
have to fumble about for your prayer book and light when it is time to pray; neither will you be
distracted by anything you see while you are performing your prayers, but can more easily
maintain thoughtful petition toward God. You will see for yourself what a great help this is. The
fact that you will have your prayer book with you at all times and in all places is of great
significance.

Being thus prepared, when you stand at prayer be careful to keep your mind from drifting and
your feeling from coldness and indifference, exerting yourself in every way to keep your
attention and to spark warmth of feeling. After you have recited each prayer, make
prostrations, as many as you like, accompanied by a prayer for any necessity that you feel, or by
the usual short prayer. This will lengthen your prayer time a little, but its power will be
increased. You should pray a little longer on your own especially at the end of your prayers,
asking forgiveness for unintentional straying of the mind, and placing yourself in God's hands for
the entire day.

You must also maintain prayerful attention toward God throughout the day. For this, as we
have already mentioned more than once, there is remembrance of God; and for remembrance
of God, there are short prayers. It is good, very good, to memorize several psalms and recite
them while you are working or between tasks, doing this instead of short prayers sometimes,
with concentration. This is one of the most ancient Christian customs, mentioned by and
included in the rules of St. Pachomius and St. Anthony.

After spending the day in this manner, you must pray more diligently and with more
concentration in the evening. Increase your prostrations and petitions to God, and after you
have placed yourself in Divine hands once again, go to bed with a short prayer on your lips and
fall asleep with it or recite some psalm.
Logged
Irish Hermit
Kibernetski Kaludjer
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,991


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us


« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2009, 06:59:49 AM »



Which psalms should you memorize? Memorize the ones that strike your heart as you are
reading them. Each person will find different psalms to be more effective for himself. Begin with
Have mercy on me, O God (Psalm 50); then Bless the Lord, O my soul (Psalm 102); and Praise the
Lord, O my Soul (Psalm 145). These latter two are the antiphon hymns in the Liturgy. There are
also the psalms in the Canon for Divine Communion: The Lord is my shepherd (Psalm 22); The
earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof (Psalm 23); I believed, wherefore I spake (Psalm 115); and
the first psalm of the evening vigil, O God, be attentive unto helping me (Psalm 69). There are the
psalms of the hours, and the like. Read the Psalter and select.

After you have memorized all of these, you will always be fully armed with prayer. When some
disturbing thought occurs, rush to fall down before the Lord with either a short prayer or one
of the psalms, especially O God, be attentive unto helping me, and the disturbing cloud will
immediately disperse.

There you are; everything on the subject of a prayer rule. I will, however, mention once again
that you should remember that all these are aids, and the most important thing is standing
before God with the mind in the heart with devotion and heartfelt prostration to Him.

I will repeat once again that the essence of prayer is the lifting of the mind and heart to God;
these little rules are an aid. We cannot get by without them because of our weakness. May the
Lord bless you!

Excerpted from The Spiritual Life and How to Be Attuned to It
(Platina, CA: St. Herman of Alaska Brotherhood, 1996).
Logged
HandmaidenofGod
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Ukrainian Orthodox Church of the USA (Ecumenical Patriarch)
Posts: 3,378


O Holy St. Demetrius pray to God for us!


« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2009, 07:42:50 AM »

This is why I love Orthodoxy; practical sound advice that makes coming to Christ so simple.

Thank you Father for posting this.
Logged

"For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the LORD, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope." Jer 29:11
Thomas
Moderator
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 2,762



« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2009, 02:52:28 AM »

Here is something I share with the Catechumen in my Orthopraxis Class  in my home parish:

Prayer is learned only by praying. A good way to learn how to pray is to use the words of the Lords Prayer.  This prayer is the example of pure prayer.

It contains the three elements of prayer: Praising, Thanking, and Asking  (for ourselves in petition and for others in intercession).  By putting ourselves into the words of the prayer, we learn what we must pray for the Holy Spirit will reveal it to us.

“For you are in the Spirit, if the Spirit of God really dwells in you…for all who are led by the Spirit are sons of God…when we cry, ‘Abba! Father!’  it is the Spirit Himself bearing witness with our spirit that we are children of God… for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the  Spirit Himself intercedes with us with sighs too deep for words…” (Romans Cool


An excellent prayer rule that is simple to follow is the use of the Antiochian Archdiocese’s little Prayer Book.  It has divided a short prayer cycle to be used three times a day that includes an abbreviated morning, noon, and evening prayers.

To those who wish a slightly more complicated rule but is still developed for those in a busy industrial society, you may wish to use the prayer rule of St. Seraphim of Sarov:
" 1)Upon rising from sleep, let each Christian, standing before the holy icons, read the prayer "Our Father" thrice, in honor of the Most Holy Trinity.
   2) Then the song of the Mother of God: "Rejoice, O Virgin Theotokos Mary, full of grace…" also thrice.
   3) In conclusion the Creed: "I believe…" — once. Completing such a rule, let each Orthodox engage in his duties, to which he is assigned or called. During his work at home or along the way anywhere he should quietly say "Lord Jesus Christ, have mercy upon me, a sinner," but if others surround him, then, while busy with his duties, let him only say in his mind "Lord, have mercy," — and thus until lunch. Right before lunch let him repeat the morning rule. After lunch, busy with his work, let every Christian say just as quietly: "Most Holy Mother of God, save me, a sinner." When preparing for sleep, let every Christian again read the morning rule, i.e., "Our Father" thrice, "Rejoice, O Virgin Theotokos Mary" thrice and once "I believe."

St. Seraphim explained that, keeping to this small "rule," one may attain a measure of Christian perfection, because these three prayers — are the foundation of Christianity. The first, as the prayer given by the Lord Himself, is the pattern for all prayers. The second was brought from Heaven by the Archangel as he greeted the Mother of God. The Creed contains in itself all the important dogmas of the Christian faith.

The Lord’s Prayer
Our Father, Who art in the heavens, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.  Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.

Hymn to the Most-holy Theotokos
O Theotokos and Virgin, rejoice, Mary full of grace, the Lord is with Thee; blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the Fruit of thy womb, for thou hast borne the Savior of our souls.

The Symbol of our Faith
I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible.  And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, the Only-begotten, begotten of the Father before all ages; Light of Light; true God of true God; begotten, not made; of one essence with the Father; by Whom all things were made; Who for us men, and for our salvation, came down from the heavens, and was incarnate of the Holy Spirit and the Virgin Mary, and became man; And was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate, and suffered and was buried; And arose again on the third day according to the Scriptures; And ascended into the heavens, and sitteth at the right hand of the Father; And shall come again, with glory, to judge both the living and the dead; Whose kingdom shall have no end. And in the Holy spirit, the Lord, the Giver of life; Who proceedeth from the Father; Who with the Father and the Son together is worshipped and glorified; Who spake by the prophets. In One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.  I confess one baptism for the remission of sins. I look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the age to come.  Amen.

Memorizing the Psalms.
It is good, very good, to memorize several psalms and recite them while you are working or between tasks, doing this instead of short prayers sometimes, with concentration. This is one of the most ancient Christian customs, mentioned by and included in the rules of St. Pachomius and St. Anthony.

Which psalms should you memorize? Memorize the ones that strike your heart as you are reading them. Each person will find different psalms to be more effective for himself. Begin with Have mercy on me, O God (Psalm 50); then Bless the Lord, O my soul (Psalm 102); and Praise the Lord, O my Soul (Psalm 145). These latter two are the antiphon hymns in the Liturgy. There are also the psalms in the Canon for Divine Communion: The Lord is my shepherd (Psalm 22); The earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof (Psalm 23); I believed, wherefore I spake (Psalm 115); and the first psalm of the evening vigil, O God, be attentive unto helping me (Psalm 69).

I hope that you will find this helpful; as you develop a personal prayer rule with your spiritual father.

Thomas
Logged

Your brother in Christ ,
Thomas
Michał
['mi:hɑʊ]
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic (again!)
Jurisdiction: the Latin Church
Posts: 824


"Mother of God, Virgin, by God glorified Mary..."


« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2009, 04:20:20 PM »

The Lord’s Prayer
Our Father, Who art in the heavens, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.  Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.
Where exactly is the thanking element?
Logged
Fr. George
formerly "Cleveland"
Administrator
Stratopedarches
*******
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox (Catholic) Christian
Jurisdiction: GOA - Metropolis of Pittsburgh
Posts: 19,979


May the Lord bless you and keep you always!


« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2009, 04:50:32 PM »

The Lord’s Prayer
Our Father, Who art in the heavens, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.  Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.
Where exactly is the thanking element?

"Hallowed be thy name."  It's less direct than "Thank you, Lord," but has the same intent.
Logged

"The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the one who can't read them." Mark Twain
---------------------
Ordained on 17 & 18-Oct 2009. Please forgive me if earlier posts are poorly worded or incorrect in any way.
Michał
['mi:hɑʊ]
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Catholic (again!)
Jurisdiction: the Latin Church
Posts: 824


"Mother of God, Virgin, by God glorified Mary..."


« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2009, 05:21:54 PM »

"Hallowed be thy name."  It's less direct than "Thank you, Lord," but has the same intent.
Thakns, now I see it. Smiley
Logged
Quinault
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Antiochian
Posts: 4,454


What about frogs? I like frogs!


« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2009, 07:24:42 PM »

Is it possible to have this thread pinned?
Logged
Basil 320
Site Supporter
Archon
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America, Holy Metropolis of Pittsburgh
Posts: 2,990



« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2009, 07:53:38 PM »

Thank you Irish Hermit for this topic and the posts.  The data is most pertinent to me.  I've gotten very lax in adhering to my customary prayer rule, under demonic influence probably, at a time when I am enjoying exceptionally substantial blessings from our Lord.  This will help inspire a return to my prayer rule, hopefully.  It's especially timely on the eve of the beginning of the Triodion Period this year.
Logged

"...Strengthen the Orthodox Community..."
bkovacs
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Byzantine Christian
Posts: 84



« Reply #10 on: March 23, 2009, 05:22:00 PM »

Wouldn't praying the Small Compline be a good starting point for a prayer rule.
Logged

"We knew not whether we were in heaven or on earth, for surely there is no such splendor or beauty anywhere on earth." The Divine Liturgy at Hagia Sophia.
PeterTheAleut
The Right Blowhard Peter the Furtive of Yetts O'Muckhart
Section Moderator
Protospatharios
*****
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 31,616


Lord, have mercy on the Christians in Mosul!


« Reply #11 on: March 23, 2009, 05:24:43 PM »

Wouldn't praying the Small Compline be a good starting point for a prayer rule.
Maybe for night owls like me. Grin
Logged
Byzantine2008
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 280



« Reply #12 on: March 23, 2009, 07:21:19 PM »

Wouldn't praying the Small Compline be a good starting point for a prayer rule.
Maybe for night owls like me. Grin

Any links for the small compline.

Thanks in advance
Logged

Let your will be done O Lord Jesus Christ through the intercession of you All Pure Mother and all the saints!
bkovacs
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Byzantine Christian
Posts: 84



« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2009, 08:39:24 PM »

Small Compline

As a Reader Service

http://www.saintjonah.org/services/compline.htm  Smiley
Logged

"We knew not whether we were in heaven or on earth, for surely there is no such splendor or beauty anywhere on earth." The Divine Liturgy at Hagia Sophia.
Byzantine2008
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Posts: 280



« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2009, 08:56:36 PM »

Small Compline

As a Reader Service

http://www.saintjonah.org/services/compline.htm  Smiley

What exactly is the small compline used for?

Is it meant to be used as an evening prayer service or morning prayer service?
Logged

Let your will be done O Lord Jesus Christ through the intercession of you All Pure Mother and all the saints!
PeterTheAleut
The Right Blowhard Peter the Furtive of Yetts O'Muckhart
Section Moderator
Protospatharios
*****
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 31,616


Lord, have mercy on the Christians in Mosul!


« Reply #15 on: March 24, 2009, 11:02:14 PM »

Small Compline

As a Reader Service

http://www.saintjonah.org/services/compline.htm  Smiley

What exactly is the small compline used for?

Is it meant to be used as an evening prayer service or morning prayer service?
Compline is actually intended for use after dinner and before bedtime (for most people, 8 p.m. or thereabouts).  For the morning we have Matins, and for the early evening, Vespers.
« Last Edit: March 24, 2009, 11:04:03 PM by PeterTheAleut » Logged
Jonathan Gress
Warned
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOC/HOTCA
Posts: 3,018


« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2009, 06:51:38 PM »

Fr Steven Allen has a fantastic guide on establishing regular prayer; you can find it at www.saint-spyridon.com, under "Notebook". He says (and he got this from an old Russian bishop, not sure who) that the key is struggling for attention and spending the same time every day. This is how you get started. Do not make it too long, even if at first that seems better. Talk about it in more detail with your spiritual father, of course.
Logged
Mivac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 247


« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2009, 08:34:13 AM »

Thank you Irish Hermit for this topic and the posts.  The data is most pertinent to me.  I've gotten very lax in adhering to my customary prayer rule, under demonic influence probably, at a time when I am enjoying exceptionally substantial blessings from our Lord.  This will help inspire a return to my prayer rule, hopefully.  It's especially timely on the eve of the beginning of the Triodion Period this year.

I believe this is a very common problem with many people during times of great blessings from our Lord. We all should know that a strong consistent prayer life is a thorn in demonics sides.  I know for me when I stop having my heart and mind on the Lord is usually when I fall into sin, and even at times I feel under pressure to sin during (which is very frustrating) prayer.   My prayer life I believe is the main reason I was drawn to Orthodoxy.
Logged
TheProdigalDaughter
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 43



« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2009, 11:25:47 PM »


Thank you for this information. As new to the faith this has really blessed me.
 laugh
« Last Edit: December 11, 2009, 11:26:08 PM by TheProdigalSon » Logged

'Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.' Proverbs 27:17
Michael L
Priest Michael
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR
Posts: 240



« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2009, 11:51:26 PM »

The best advice I have received about prayer rules was by my Parish Priest/Spiritual Father and is also echoed in this posting by Priest Andrew Phillips on the Orthodox England website: http://www.orthodoxengland.org.uk/qa3.htm

Quote
Question

Perhaps these questions could be also useful for your readers? I raise them because of possible misinterpretations I myself have made when reading spiritual teachers (ex. St. Theophan the Recluse) as well issues related to those who may present themselves as a "spiritual father."

For laypeople, what prayer rule do you most commonly recommend? The prescribed morning and evening prayers?

Are prayer rules such as those of St. Seraphim of Sarov for "busy people" applicable in only a limited context?

As a Confessor, what has been your experience in helping laypeople establish a prayer rule?

Answer

It is very simple. Follow the prayer book. That belongs to the Church, not to individuals, who set themselves up as 'spiritual fathers'. Morning and evening prayers, and force yourselves to do them day in, day out.

If in a hurry in the morning, read them on the way to work or substitute with the Jesus Prayer, said secretly and without any display of prayer knots (which are to be kept in the pocket), not showily wound around wrists as decoration). Alternatively get up earlier!

Prayer rules are for monasteries. Folow the Church. It is simple, do not invent things that the Church has not appointed.

Fr Andrew
Logged
TheProdigalDaughter
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 43



« Reply #20 on: December 12, 2009, 12:05:06 AM »

The best advice I have received about prayer rules was by my Parish Priest/Spiritual Father and is also echoed in this posting by Priest Andrew Phillips on the Orthodox England website: http://www.orthodoxengland.org.uk/qa3.htm

Quote
Question

Perhaps these questions could be also useful for your readers? I raise them because of possible misinterpretations I myself have made when reading spiritual teachers (ex. St. Theophan the Recluse) as well issues related to those who may present themselves as a "spiritual father."

For laypeople, what prayer rule do you most commonly recommend? The prescribed morning and evening prayers?

Are prayer rules such as those of St. Seraphim of Sarov for "busy people" applicable in only a limited context?

As a Confessor, what has been your experience in helping laypeople establish a prayer rule?

Answer

It is very simple. Follow the prayer book. That belongs to the Church, not to individuals, who set themselves up as 'spiritual fathers'. Morning and evening prayers, and force yourselves to do them day in, day out.

If in a hurry in the morning, read them on the way to work or substitute with the Jesus Prayer, said secretly and without any display of prayer knots (which are to be kept in the pocket), not showily wound around wrists as decoration). Alternatively get up earlier!

Prayer rules are for monasteries. Folow the Church. It is simple, do not invent things that the Church has not appointed.

Fr Andrew

Thank you.

Question: Why do we pray to saints and not just Christ?
Logged

'Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.' Proverbs 27:17
Fr. George
formerly "Cleveland"
Administrator
Stratopedarches
*******
Online Online

Faith: Orthodox (Catholic) Christian
Jurisdiction: GOA - Metropolis of Pittsburgh
Posts: 19,979


May the Lord bless you and keep you always!


« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2009, 12:29:51 AM »

Question: Why do we pray to saints and not just Christ?

We pray for the help and prayers of the Saints because they can be helpful, and God has chosen in the past to use them to benefit us.  The practice of asking ancestors to pray to God for us is as old as Judaism, but we also have concrete examples of those who have departed this present life helping us by God's grace (like the bones of Elisha).  They are helpers that God uses to bless us, and as models of God-fearing life - by using so many different people as intermediaries, He demonstrates the many paths to holiness that are possible.  They don't replace prayer to Christ, they just augment it: instead of one voice praying for you, there can be thousands, millions even.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2009, 12:30:02 AM by Fr. George » Logged

"The man who doesn't read good books has no advantage over the one who can't read them." Mark Twain
---------------------
Ordained on 17 & 18-Oct 2009. Please forgive me if earlier posts are poorly worded or incorrect in any way.
Michael L
Priest Michael
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR
Posts: 240



« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2009, 12:37:39 AM »

Just to add an additional resource to the accurate and succinct answer given by Fr. George:

Quote
Our Intercessors in Heaven
By Bishop Alexander (Mileant)

During baptism, a person is given a name in honor of one of the saints, who from that moment becomes his heavenly patron. Each Orthodox Christian should know the "life" — the history — of his heavenly patron and turn to him in prayer for help and guidance. Our devout ancestors tried to commemorate the day of their saint’s memory — "the angel’s day" — by partaking of the Holy Communion and celebrating this day more festively than their birthday.

What is the meaning of the orthodox reverence of the holy servants of God? Do the saints in Heaven know of our needs and difficulties and are they interested in us? Do they hear our prayers to them and do they try to help us? Indeed should we turn to saints for help, or is it enough to pray only to the Lord God? Sectarians, who have lost the apostolic traditions, do not understand the essence and purpose of Christ’s Church and thus deny the necessity of prayers to the saints in Heaven. We will briefly outline herein the Orthodox teaching concerning this.

Orthodox reverence of the holy servants of God comes from the conviction that all of us, those seeking salvation or those already saved, living and dead, form a single family of God. The Church is a great society, encompassing the visible and invisible world. It is a huge, universal organization, built on the principle of love, in which each member must care not only about himself, but about the well-being and salvation of others. Saints are those people which during their life more than others expressed love to others.

We orthodox believe that, when a righteous person dies, he does not sever his ties with the Church, but crosses over to its higher, heavenly domain — into the Church triumphant. Once in the spiritual world, the soul of the righteous person does not stop thinking, wanting, feeling. Just the opposite, these characteristics are revealed more fully and completely.

Modern non-Orthodox Christians, having lost the active connection with the heavenly-earthly Church, have the most vague and contradicting ideas concerning the afterlife. Some of them think that after death the soul of the person falls asleep and is as though shut off from everything; others — that the soul of a person, even if it continues its activity after death, does not concern itself with the world which it has departed. Others — that as a matter of principle one should not pray to saints, because a Christian has direct association with God.

What is the teaching of the Holy Scriptures concerning the righteous who have departed the earthly world, and the power of their prayers? In apostolic times the Church was considered as one Heavenly/earthly spiritual family. The Apostle Paul wrote to newly-converted Christians: "But ye are come unto mount Sion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to an innumerable company of angels, To the general assembly and church of the firstborn, which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect" (Heb. 12:22-23). In other words, you, by becoming Christians, have joined a great family and come into close contact with the heavenly world and with the righteous who are found therein. The parting words of the Apostle Peter — "Moreover I will endeavor that ye may be able after my decease to have these things always in remembrance" (2 Peter 1:15) — clearly attest to the fact that he promises to continue to care about them from that spiritual world.

The ancient practice of turning to the holy martyrs and servants of God for help is based on the recognition of the active association of the Heavenly-earthly Church and on the basis of faith in the power of prayer.

Read the entire text here: http://www.fatheralexander.org/booklets/english/saints_b_alexander_e.htm#n1
Logged
TheProdigalDaughter
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 43



« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2010, 08:39:51 AM »

Question: Why do we pray to saints and not just Christ?

We pray for the help and prayers of the Saints because they can be helpful, and God has chosen in the past to use them to benefit us.  The practice of asking ancestors to pray to God for us is as old as Judaism, but we also have concrete examples of those who have departed this present life helping us by God's grace (like the bones of Elisha).  They are helpers that God uses to bless us, and as models of God-fearing life - by using so many different people as intermediaries, He demonstrates the many paths to holiness that are possible.  They don't replace prayer to Christ, they just augment it: instead of one voice praying for you, there can be thousands, millions even.

Thank you Fr. George
Logged

'Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.' Proverbs 27:17
TheProdigalDaughter
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 43



« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2010, 08:40:43 AM »

Just to add an additional resource to the accurate and succinct answer given by Fr. George:

Quote
Our Intercessors in Heaven
By Bishop Alexander (Mileant)

During baptism, a person is given a name in honor of one of the saints, who from that moment becomes his heavenly patron. Each Orthodox Christian should know the "life" — the history — of his heavenly patron and turn to him in prayer for help and guidance. Our devout ancestors tried to commemorate the day of their saint’s memory — "the angel’s day" — by partaking of the Holy Communion and celebrating this day more festively than their birthday.

What is the meaning of the orthodox reverence of the holy servants of God? Do the saints in Heaven know of our needs and difficulties and are they interested in us? Do they hear our prayers to them and do they try to help us? Indeed should we turn to saints for help, or is it enough to pray only to the Lord God? Sectarians, who have lost the apostolic traditions, do not understand the essence and purpose of Christ’s Church and thus deny the necessity of prayers to the saints in Heaven. We will briefly outline herein the Orthodox teaching concerning this.

Orthodox reverence of the holy servants of God comes from the conviction that all of us, those seeking salvation or those already saved, living and dead, form a single family of God. The Church is a great society, encompassing the visible and invisible world. It is a huge, universal organization, built on the principle of love, in which each member must care not only about himself, but about the well-being and salvation of others. Saints are those people which during their life more than others expressed love to others.

We orthodox believe that, when a righteous person dies, he does not sever his ties with the Church, but crosses over to its higher, heavenly domain — into the Church triumphant. Once in the spiritual world, the soul of the righteous person does not stop thinking, wanting, feeling. Just the opposite, these characteristics are revealed more fully and completely.

Modern non-Orthodox Christians, having lost the active connection with the heavenly-earthly Church, have the most vague and contradicting ideas concerning the afterlife. Some of them think that after death the soul of the person falls asleep and is as though shut off from everything; others — that the soul of a person, even if it continues its activity after death, does not concern itself with the world which it has departed. Others — that as a matter of principle one should not pray to saints, because a Christian has direct association with God.

What is the teaching of the Holy Scriptures concerning the righteous who have departed the earthly world, and the power of their prayers? In apostolic times the Church was considered as one Heavenly/earthly spiritual family. The Apostle Paul wrote to newly-converted Christians: "But ye are come unto mount Sion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to an innumerable company of angels, To the general assembly and church of the firstborn, which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect" (Heb. 12:22-23). In other words, you, by becoming Christians, have joined a great family and come into close contact with the heavenly world and with the righteous who are found therein. The parting words of the Apostle Peter — "Moreover I will endeavor that ye may be able after my decease to have these things always in remembrance" (2 Peter 1:15) — clearly attest to the fact that he promises to continue to care about them from that spiritual world.

The ancient practice of turning to the holy martyrs and servants of God for help is based on the recognition of the active association of the Heavenly-earthly Church and on the basis of faith in the power of prayer.

Read the entire text here: http://www.fatheralexander.org/booklets/english/saints_b_alexander_e.htm#n1

Thank you, most enlightening.
Logged

'Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.' Proverbs 27:17
GammaRay
The Awful Preacher
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Greek
Posts: 574


Alexandros Papadiamantis


« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2010, 01:02:33 PM »

Thanks a lot, I was just thinking today about organizing my prayers. This is going to be some helpful. I often get carried away by Archaic English though and I fail to learn them in Ancient Greek. Bah, the feelings are still the same!
Logged

Though I've walked the valley of the shadow of the death, I've fallen not. Not completely. Not yet.
Isadore
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Mediterranean
Posts: 107



« Reply #26 on: January 19, 2010, 07:12:34 AM »

Very helpful Smiley
Logged

"Acquire a peaceful spirit, and around you thousands will be saved."
Orthodox Swamp Thing
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA - San Francisco & The West
Posts: 56



« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2010, 01:39:50 AM »

I like the "A Manual of Eastern Orthodox Prayers if you want a good all around prayer book or the A Pocket Prayer Book for Orthodox Christian if you are busy as the prayers are short, sweet and to the point. When praying during the day you can always use the Jesus Prayer.... It helps in times of temptation and when under stress.....
Logged
DanM
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 249


« Reply #28 on: July 13, 2010, 10:21:16 AM »

St. Theophan:  I would consider the morning and evening prayers as set out in the prayer books to be entirely sufficient for you.

Dan:  Fr. Sergei Sveshnikov's "Morning and Evening Prayer Rules in the Russian Orthodox Tradition" may be of some interest for providing a historical perspective.
St. John Chrysostom also mentions what appears to be a prayer-rule in a homily on Colossians.  He said he knew
 
a certain holy man who prayeth thus. He used to say nothing before these words, but thus, "We give Thee thanks for all Thy benefits bestowed upon us the unworthy, from the first day until the present, for what we know, and what we know not, for the seen, for the unseen, for those in deed, those in word, those with our wills, those against our wills, for all that have been bestowed upon the unworthy, even us; for tribulations, for refreshments, for hell, for punishment, for the kingdom of heaven. We beseech Thee to keep our soul holy, having a pure conscience; an end worthy of thy lovingkindness. Thou that lovedst us so as to give Thy Only-Begotten for us, grant us to become worthy of Thy love; give us wisdom in Thy word, and in Thy fear. Only-Begotten Christ, inspire the strength that is from Thee. Thou that gavest The Only-Begotten for us, and hast sent Thy Holy Spirit for the remission of our sins, if in aught we have wilfully or unwillingly transgressed, pardon, and impute it not. Remember all that call upon Thy Name in truth; remember all that wish us well, or the contrary, for we are all men." Then having added the Prayer of the Faithful [i.e., the Our Father], he there ended; having made that prayer, as a certain crowning part, and a binding together for all.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2010, 10:22:40 AM by DanM » Logged
HabteSelassie
Ises and I-ity
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church
Posts: 3,332



« Reply #29 on: November 03, 2010, 09:05:48 PM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

I recommend highly the Coptic Orthodox prayer book the Agpeya, the Book of the Hours.  It is a common prayer book amongst Christendom, both Latin and Orthodox, but the Coptic version is particularly ancient in status and is one of the origins.  It is said that in the deserts in Egypt the Desert Fathers first composed the ordered prayers with the psalter we know as the Book of the Hours in several traditions.  The Agpeya today is the modern version, with a series of psalms, litanies, supplications, hymns, absolutions and other common prayers of the Coptic Church.  There is is the central prayer book in all services, and whether they be baptisms, funerals, Liturgies, offerings or vigils usually the Agpeya prayers accompany the others used.  

I have been using it for years now, and honestly I wouldn't know what to do without it.  The Tewahedo Church uses the Se'at, but there is no English translation which is why I chant the Agpeya, which is readily available.  It is by far the most thorough and complete of any prayer books I have come across from any of the traditions.

It has Seven Canonical Hours, in relation to Christ's Incarnation, Passion, and Resurrection with 12 Psalms appointed for each hour, a Gospel reading, six litanies, the Lord Have Mercies, Trisiagon, Absolution, Ending of the Hour.  

Starting small and taking it slowly on a carte blanc pick and choose kind of way, this prayer book really begins to readjust our daily lives towards to rhythms and cycles of the prayerful life of the Fathers, and helps a person begin to make sense of the world and our daily routines in Christ.

Stay Blessed,
Habte Selassie
« Last Edit: November 03, 2010, 09:08:16 PM by HabteSelassie » Logged

"Yet stand aloof from stupid questionings and geneologies and strifes and fightings about law, for they are without benefit and vain." Titus 3:10
Rufus
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: GOA
Posts: leet


Nafpliotis with sunglasses and a cigar.


« Reply #30 on: November 04, 2010, 01:07:53 PM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

I recommend highly the Coptic Orthodox prayer book the Agpeya, the Book of the Hours.  It is a common prayer book amongst Christendom, both Latin and Orthodox, but the Coptic version is particularly ancient in status and is one of the origins.  It is said that in the deserts in Egypt the Desert Fathers first composed the ordered prayers with the psalter we know as the Book of the Hours in several traditions.  The Agpeya today is the modern version, with a series of psalms, litanies, supplications, hymns, absolutions and other common prayers of the Coptic Church.  There is is the central prayer book in all services, and whether they be baptisms, funerals, Liturgies, offerings or vigils usually the Agpeya prayers accompany the others used.  

I have been using it for years now, and honestly I wouldn't know what to do without it.  The Tewahedo Church uses the Se'at, but there is no English translation which is why I chant the Agpeya, which is readily available.  It is by far the most thorough and complete of any prayer books I have come across from any of the traditions.

It has Seven Canonical Hours, in relation to Christ's Incarnation, Passion, and Resurrection with 12 Psalms appointed for each hour, a Gospel reading, six litanies, the Lord Have Mercies, Trisiagon, Absolution, Ending of the Hour.  

Starting small and taking it slowly on a carte blanc pick and choose kind of way, this prayer book really begins to readjust our daily lives towards to rhythms and cycles of the prayerful life of the Fathers, and helps a person begin to make sense of the world and our daily routines in Christ.

Stay Blessed,
Habte Selassie

I am glad to hear that you have been using it so long...I feel like most prayer books "burn out" after a while. I think using the hours services (perhaps shortened to fit a person's abilities) is really the best way to go in the long run. I have an Agpeya, and it is the main book I use. It is truly wonderful, and it is small enough to be carried everywhere.
Logged
peteprint
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 704



« Reply #31 on: November 14, 2010, 09:24:43 PM »

This is a wonderful thread.  There are so many thoughtful and helpful posts regarding a daily prayer rule. 

Prior to, and since becoming Orthodox, I acquired several prayer books to use for daily prayer.  They are all very similar in their format, (Jordanville, Holy Transfiguration Monastery, the little red prayerbook, St. Tikhon's, etc.) and, as I prayed each day, morning and evening, I varied the books I would use to have a little variety.

Though I am in the Serbian Church, last month I became aware of the St. Philip's Prayer Discipline that is part of the Fellowship of St. John the Divine of the Antiochian Archdiocese.  For $25.00 I joined and received "A Beginner's Guide to Prayer," by Fr. Michael Keiser, along with the St. Philip's Prayer Manual.

I am finding both very useful in my prayer life; the manual has morning, mid-day, and evening prayers for each day of the week with variable parts for each day, which is a really nice feature.  The Saturday evening and Sunday prayers are different than those used on the weekdays.

This discipline has given me more structure to my daily prayers, and I am grateful that I happened upon it.
Logged
peteprint
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Posts: 704



« Reply #32 on: November 14, 2010, 09:29:02 PM »

If anyone is interested in investigating the St. Philip's Prayer Discipline, here is a link:

http://www.stphilipsprayerdiscipline.org/about.php
Logged
fisherman
crow
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: orthodox
Jurisdiction: Russian
Posts: 43


redwood81
« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2011, 02:19:28 AM »

http://www.northumbriacommunity.org/pray-the-daily-office
Logged

pax
Shlomlokh
主哀れめよ!
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Bulgarian
Posts: 1,220



« Reply #34 on: January 17, 2011, 11:16:06 PM »

I'm not sure if I would recommend that. They look to be some independent group without any link to a canonical Orthodox body. :/

In Christ,
Andrew
Logged

"I will pour out my prayer unto the Lord, and to Him will I proclaim my grief; for with evils my soul is filled, and my life unto hades hath drawn nigh, and like Jonah I will pray: From corruption raise me up, O God." -Ode VI, Irmos of the Supplicatory Canon to the Theotokos
myrrhbear
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 194


Trust in God


« Reply #35 on: January 19, 2011, 04:06:34 PM »

There are morning and evening prayers in the back of the Orthodox Study Bible, too.
Logged

Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding.
peacenprayer
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox
Jurisdiction: GOMT
Posts: 94


ting ting ting


« Reply #36 on: January 21, 2011, 12:52:25 AM »

For my evening prayers I've been using the Jordanville Prayer Book. But I've been wondering... are you supposed to read each consecutive prayer or to say just a few? I've been saying each, but many of them seem to be different only in wording.
Logged

Chanter, Blacksmith, Tailor, Captain of the Guard. ...I made the last one up.
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #37 on: January 21, 2011, 01:03:56 AM »

The Lord’s Prayer
Our Father, Who art in the heavens, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.  Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.
Where exactly is the thanking element?

It's probably more thankful if the interpolated doxology is added.
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #38 on: January 21, 2011, 01:07:13 AM »

Question: Why do we pray to saints and not just Christ?

Because their intercession has been objectively shown to the Church on numerous occasions to be efficacious. It has become clear to us that God desires the incorporation of His Saints in His Work.
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #39 on: January 21, 2011, 01:08:50 AM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

I recommend highly the Coptic Orthodox prayer book the Agpeya, the Book of the Hours.  It is a common prayer book amongst Christendom, both Latin and Orthodox, but the Coptic version is particularly ancient in status and is one of the origins.  It is said that in the deserts in Egypt the Desert Fathers first composed the ordered prayers with the psalter we know as the Book of the Hours in several traditions.  The Agpeya today is the modern version, with a series of psalms, litanies, supplications, hymns, absolutions and other common prayers of the Coptic Church.  There is is the central prayer book in all services, and whether they be baptisms, funerals, Liturgies, offerings or vigils usually the Agpeya prayers accompany the others used.  

I have been using it for years now, and honestly I wouldn't know what to do without it.  The Tewahedo Church uses the Se'at, but there is no English translation which is why I chant the Agpeya, which is readily available.  It is by far the most thorough and complete of any prayer books I have come across from any of the traditions.

It has Seven Canonical Hours, in relation to Christ's Incarnation, Passion, and Resurrection with 12 Psalms appointed for each hour, a Gospel reading, six litanies, the Lord Have Mercies, Trisiagon, Absolution, Ending of the Hour.  

Starting small and taking it slowly on a carte blanc pick and choose kind of way, this prayer book really begins to readjust our daily lives towards to rhythms and cycles of the prayerful life of the Fathers, and helps a person begin to make sense of the world and our daily routines in Christ.

Stay Blessed,
Habte Selassie

That's cool that you use the Coptic Agpeya.
Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
deusveritasest
Taxiarches
**********
Offline Offline

Faith: None
Jurisdiction: None
Posts: 7,528



WWW
« Reply #40 on: January 21, 2011, 01:10:37 AM »

I'm not sure if I would recommend that. They look to be some independent group without any link to a canonical Orthodox body. :/

In Christ,
Andrew

Why are the prayers of a non-canonical group so much more dangerous than that of a Non-Chalcedonian group? (noting that no one spoke up when Rufus says he uses the Agpeya)  Huh
« Last Edit: January 21, 2011, 01:10:54 AM by deusveritasest » Logged

I stopped posting here in August 2011 because of stark disagreement with the policies of the administration and moderating team of the forums. If you desire, feel free to PM me, message me on Facebook (link in profile), or email me: cddombrowski@gmail.com
Irish Hermit
Kibernetski Kaludjer
Warned
Merarches
***********
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,991


Holy Father Patrick, pray for us


« Reply #41 on: January 21, 2011, 02:29:56 AM »

I'm not sure if I would recommend that. They look to be some independent group without any link to a canonical Orthodox body. :/

In Christ,
Andrew

Why are the prayers of a non-canonical group so much more dangerous than that of a Non-Chalcedonian group? (noting that no one spoke up when Rufus says he uses the Agpeya)  Huh

They are dangerous because they convey something out of whack with Christianity and if used constantly will create in the soul a wrong apprehension of God.

Eaxmples:

1.  Orthodox prayer is suffused with worship of the Trinity.  This is usually almost completely absent from modern Protestant prayer forms.  They create the impression that God is a kind of benevolent Creator and Sustainer whose main worry for you is that you learn ecolological awareness and don't litter the beach.

2.  Orthodox prayer is also suffused with the worship of Christ as God.   Many mainstream Christians are not convinced of His divinity and so they tend not to mention Him too much in modern prayer.

3.  Veneration and warmth and prayer to the Mother of God , your Guardian Angel and the Saints --- forget it!

etc.

Don't use these prayer books.  Find an Orthodox prayer book which you like and stick with it.

If you want to add something like a Celtic touch to your prayers, find some of the many prayers from the ancient Saints of Ireland.  They share the same sentiments as modern Orthodox prayers.  Add them into your Orthodox prayer book.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2011, 02:30:59 AM by Irish Hermit » Logged
jamesdm49
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia
Posts: 35


« Reply #42 on: May 29, 2011, 07:49:54 PM »

Wouldn't praying the Small Compline be a good starting point for a prayer rule.

IMO, the Church's liturgical services are public prayer, and not suitable for private use. The reader version of services is intended to be performed publicly in parishes or monasteries without an ordained priest, and even then, only with the blessing of the local bishop. Privately, or in the family at home, if we can't be in church for the public services, we read morning and evening prayers and, perhaps, a canon or akathist. But what is far more ancient than the modern prayer books (which have only been in widespread use since the 19th century), and, I find, more sustainable, is to read the psalter. Here is what St. Basil has to say about it:

"David says, Wait thou on the Lord, and keep His way, and He shall promote thee, that thou shalt possess the land [Psalm 36:34]; so let not a single day pass without singing from the Psalter. If, for some reason, you are obliged to set it aside, mark the place, and begin again the next morning, not stopping out of slothfulness."

When St. John Chrysostom was asked, “Is it good to lay aside the Psalter?” He replied, “It would be better for the sun to fall from its orbit, than to neglect reading the Psalter, for it is of great benefit to study the psalms, and to read the Psalter diligently. For all books are profitable for us, and grieve the demons, but there is none like the Psalter.”

We can see from these two quotations that the fathers of old considered daily Psalter reading to be essential for Christians, and the desert fathers also considered the recitation of the psalter to be the essence of Christian prayer. So, instead of struggling with prayer books and rules, just begin with the Jesus Prayer and "O heavenly King" through to the Lord's Prayer. Then, having said, "O come let us worship" just begin with Psalm 1 and work your way through to the end, marking where you stop, morning and evening. Ideally, one would get through the whole psalter every week, but the most important is just to read some portion every day, and when you are finished, begin again. If you add to this a daily reading from the Scriptures and the Lives of the Saints, your prayer life will be rich, indeed.

David James
Logged
Rufus
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: GOA
Posts: leet


Nafpliotis with sunglasses and a cigar.


« Reply #43 on: May 30, 2011, 12:04:24 PM »

Wouldn't praying the Small Compline be a good starting point for a prayer rule.

IMO, the Church's liturgical services are public prayer, and not suitable for private use. The reader version of services is intended to be performed publicly in parishes or monasteries without an ordained priest, and even then, only with the blessing of the local bishop. Privately, or in the family at home, if we can't be in church for the public services, we read morning and evening prayers and, perhaps, a canon or akathist. But what is far more ancient than the modern prayer books (which have only been in widespread use since the 19th century), and, I find, more sustainable, is to read the psalter. Here is what St. Basil has to say about it:

"David says, Wait thou on the Lord, and keep His way, and He shall promote thee, that thou shalt possess the land [Psalm 36:34]; so let not a single day pass without singing from the Psalter. If, for some reason, you are obliged to set it aside, mark the place, and begin again the next morning, not stopping out of slothfulness."

When St. John Chrysostom was asked, “Is it good to lay aside the Psalter?” He replied, “It would be better for the sun to fall from its orbit, than to neglect reading the Psalter, for it is of great benefit to study the psalms, and to read the Psalter diligently. For all books are profitable for us, and grieve the demons, but there is none like the Psalter.”

We can see from these two quotations that the fathers of old considered daily Psalter reading to be essential for Christians, and the desert fathers also considered the recitation of the psalter to be the essence of Christian prayer. So, instead of struggling with prayer books and rules, just begin with the Jesus Prayer and "O heavenly King" through to the Lord's Prayer. Then, having said, "O come let us worship" just begin with Psalm 1 and work your way through to the end, marking where you stop, morning and evening. Ideally, one would get through the whole psalter every week, but the most important is just to read some portion every day, and when you are finished, begin again. If you add to this a daily reading from the Scriptures and the Lives of the Saints, your prayer life will be rich, indeed.

David James

I actually concur strongly with this. I myself have basically ditched the prayer books, and I now pray the Psalms of the hours regularly, and others intermittently. Memorizing them is very beneficial, because it allows us to understand the words more deeply, and makes prayer less laborious (you don't need to be dragging books around).
Logged
myrrhbear
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 194


Trust in God


« Reply #44 on: May 30, 2011, 04:24:19 PM »

Additionally you can find cd's of the psalms being sung. While listening it helps you memorize them at the same time.
Logged

Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding.
HabteSelassie
Ises and I-ity
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church
Posts: 3,332



« Reply #45 on: May 30, 2011, 04:57:31 PM »

Greetings in that Divine and Most Precious Name of Our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ!

I have an Agpeya, and it is the main book I use. It is truly wonderful, and it is small enough to be carried everywhere.
Isn't it? After a while when the prayers have been memorized, you can just carry around a small pocket New Testament with the Psalter with you and need nothing more.  
This is a wonderful thread.  There are so many thoughtful and helpful posts regarding a daily prayer rule.  

Prior to, and since becoming Orthodox, I acquired several prayer books to use for daily prayer.


I think another very helpful prayer routine is to find a melody from the Church to chant and accompany the texts prayers and Psalms rather then just to recite or read them.  As Saint Augustine said, "They who sing  pray twice."  The chanting really brings the meditation of prayer into full effect, and lifts us momentarily out of the mundane towards the Divine.  Learning to sing the prayers and Psalms in the melodies of my Ethiopian Orthodox tradition was perhaps one of the most life changing aspects of my Orthodox living, and it continues to literally reverberate across my life every new day I rise up and sing in prayer from my Agpeya.


The Ethiopian Se'at

Stay Blessed,
Habte Selassie

« Last Edit: May 30, 2011, 04:58:34 PM by HabteSelassie » Logged

"Yet stand aloof from stupid questionings and geneologies and strifes and fightings about law, for they are without benefit and vain." Titus 3:10
Hermogenes
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 493



« Reply #46 on: August 16, 2011, 01:04:10 PM »

The Lord’s Prayer
Our Father, Who art in the heavens, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.  Give us this day our daily bread, and forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from the evil one.
Where exactly is the thanking element?
Gratitude is one of the most important components of a spiritual life, IMHO, and the key ingredient for a joyful life of any kind. We look for opportunities to be grateful--the light turns green just as you get to the intersection; the subway pulls into the station just as you reach the bottom of the stairs; you make it all the way down Second Avenue on one light. You're wondering how you're going to get the door with all the stuff you're carrying, and someone steps out and opens it. These are little everyday things, and of course we express our gratitude for the major things, such as our faith, our lives, our Savior who loved us so much! I have found that cultivating the habit of gratitude in small things makes it easier to remember to thank God for the big things. And it helps me not to take anything for granted--like the fact that I have a bed, and shoes. I tend to take a lot for granted. so I really need this kind of exercise. There are a number of thanksgiving psalms, too, which you can seek out.
Logged
Hermogenes
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 493



« Reply #47 on: August 16, 2011, 01:08:02 PM »

Wouldn't praying the Small Compline be a good starting point for a prayer rule.

Oh yes!
Logged
Hermogenes
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 493



« Reply #48 on: August 16, 2011, 02:13:53 PM »

I'm not sure if I would recommend that. They look to be some independent group without any link to a canonical Orthodox body. :/

In Christ,
Andrew

Yes, they are. They are "interfaith," but I believe the founders were/are Anglicans. Seems like a nice group, and the book is a wonderful book, all things considered, but it isn't Orthodox.

I love and use the Agpeya, but I am wondering if it is really a resource I'd recommend to someone who has just converted? Except if they are in the Coptic jurisdiction, of course. I feel the same about my own personal favorite prayer book--the Old Orthodox Prayer Book. Unless a person has converted to an Old Believer church, it might be more confusing than helpful at the start.

One book I believe doesn't get the attention it deserves is the Liturgikon published by the Antiochian Archdiocese. Considering the breadth of material it contains, it is very reasonably priced; the English is quite readable (unlike some Holy Transfiguration and Jordanville texts); and it covers the important parts of the liturgical day and year. If I were only going to recommend one book, this would be it.
Logged
WPM
St. Nicholas the Wonderworker, Pray for us.
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,165



« Reply #49 on: March 09, 2012, 03:35:59 PM »

Everyday I usually focus on my prayer corner and daily rosary.
Logged
Hermogenes
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 493



« Reply #50 on: March 09, 2012, 03:59:59 PM »

Everyday I usually focus on my prayer corner and daily rosary.
Which, of course, isn't an Orthodox prayer, unless you mean a choki. 
Logged
Aindriú
Faster! Funnier!
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: Cynical
Jurisdiction: Vestibule of Hell
Posts: 3,918



WWW
« Reply #51 on: March 09, 2012, 04:33:22 PM »

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pray-always/id467806204?mt=8

New EO prayer App
Logged


I'm going to need this.
Altar Server
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian(as of 12/18/10)
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 834


Christos Anesti!


« Reply #52 on: May 22, 2012, 12:37:04 AM »

Everyday I usually focus on my prayer corner and daily rosary.
Which, of course, isn't an Orthodox prayer, unless you mean a choki. 
actually it is Smiley western rite
Logged

"Come ye take light from The Light that is never overtaken by night and glorify the Christ, who is risen from the dead"
JamesR
Virginal Chicano Blood
Protokentarchos
*********
Offline Offline

Faith: On-n-Off
Jurisdiction: OCA (the only truly Canonical American Orthodox Church)
Posts: 5,289


St. Augustine of Hippo pray for me!


« Reply #53 on: May 22, 2012, 02:46:55 AM »

I have not officially developed one although recently I have been following the prayers from the red Antiochian prayer book along with reciting five or six Psalms in order from my OSB to go with it.
Logged

Quote
You're really on to something here. Tattoo to keep you from masturbating, chew to keep you from fornicating... it's a whole new world where you outsource your crosses. You're like a Christian entrepreneur or something.
Quote
James, you have problemz.
Tommelomsky
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Russian-Orthodox
Jurisdiction: ROCOR
Posts: 443



WWW
« Reply #54 on: June 26, 2012, 05:20:08 PM »

I got a question as i have developed a prayer rule (i am a non-practicing catholic inquiring and hope if God wills it to some day become orthodox) and developing a prayerlife after this model: http://www.orthodoxprayer.org/Daily%20Prayer%20Basics.html. But i got two questions:

1) Should i add the daily scripture readings into it or should i read them after prayers in morning/evening (sometime during the day).
What do you that has been orthodox for years or your entire life recommend?

2) Is the daily scripture readings universal or do they change from church to church? I attend a russian orthodox parish in Oslo, Norway
and the orthodoxy is at a very small level here.

Blessings. Smiley
Logged

The meaning of life is to acquire the grace of the Holy Spirit.
Saint Seraphim of Sarov

Thomas said to him: “My Lord and my God!” (John 20:28)

+ Glory be to God for all things! +
africanus
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Catehumen
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 17


St. Moses the Ethiopean


WWW
« Reply #55 on: September 16, 2013, 09:21:53 PM »

How can one learn 'The Creed' in order to master it by heart?
Logged
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15,506


In solidarity with Iraqi and Syrian Nazarenes


WWW
« Reply #56 on: September 16, 2013, 09:40:03 PM »

Say it every day with your morning and evening prayers.  Smiley
Logged

Apolytikion, Tone 1, by Antonis

An eloquent crafter of divine posts
And an inheritor of the line of the Baptist
A righteous son of India
And a new apostle to the internet
O Holy Mor Ephrem,
Intercede for us, that our forum may be saved.


"Mor is a jerk." - kelly
DeniseDenise
Tiredness personified
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Faith: Catechumen no more!
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 2,408



« Reply #57 on: September 16, 2013, 10:29:55 PM »

How can one learn 'The Creed' in order to master it by heart?

Or sing it at liturgy for six months in a row...you soon won't need the words in front of you.

Logged

Please secure your own oxygen mask before assisting other passengers.
Rufus
OC.net guru
*******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: GOA
Posts: leet


Nafpliotis with sunglasses and a cigar.


« Reply #58 on: September 17, 2013, 05:04:34 PM »

How can one learn 'The Creed' in order to master it by heart?

A line or two each day, frequently reciting it as far as you've memorized.
Logged
Altar Server
High Elder
******
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian(as of 12/18/10)
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 834


Christos Anesti!


« Reply #59 on: November 13, 2013, 11:36:08 PM »

I got a question as i have developed a prayer rule (i am a non-practicing catholic inquiring and hope if God wills it to some day become orthodox) and developing a prayerlife after this model: http://www.orthodoxprayer.org/Daily%20Prayer%20Basics.html. But i got two questions:

1) Should i add the daily scripture readings into it or should i read them after prayers in morning/evening (sometime during the day).
What do you that has been orthodox for years or your entire life recommend?

2) Is the daily scripture readings universal or do they change from church to church? I attend a russian orthodox parish in Oslo, Norway
and the orthodoxy is at a very small level here.

Blessings. Smiley

I normally sit down and read scripture and some other spiritual reading after I complete my morning prayer rule (but thats just because its what works best for me) I don't think there really a rule other than that you should read scripture on your own at some point during the day.

In Christ,

Seraphim
Logged

"Come ye take light from The Light that is never overtaken by night and glorify the Christ, who is risen from the dead"
Eruvande
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Anglican
Posts: 53


« Reply #60 on: April 23, 2014, 03:42:28 PM »

This is an interesting thread, thank you. I use Our Daily Life from the British Orthodox Fellowship. I haven't yet graduated to Glory to God, which contains the longer prayers. I'm still very much a baby in Orthodox understanding and practice!
Logged
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15,506


In solidarity with Iraqi and Syrian Nazarenes


WWW
« Reply #61 on: April 23, 2014, 04:08:02 PM »

This is an interesting thread, thank you. I use Our Daily Life from the British Orthodox Fellowship. I haven't yet graduated to Glory to God, which contains the longer prayers.

What are the contents of these books?

Quote
I'm still very much a baby in Orthodox understanding and practice!

Being a baby is not always so bad.  Wink
Logged

Apolytikion, Tone 1, by Antonis

An eloquent crafter of divine posts
And an inheritor of the line of the Baptist
A righteous son of India
And a new apostle to the internet
O Holy Mor Ephrem,
Intercede for us, that our forum may be saved.


"Mor is a jerk." - kelly
Eruvande
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Faith: Anglican
Posts: 53


« Reply #62 on: April 23, 2014, 04:57:13 PM »

This is an interesting thread, thank you. I use Our Daily Life from the British Orthodox Fellowship. I haven't yet graduated to Glory to God, which contains the longer prayers.

What are the contents of these books?

Let me see... Glory to God is the name of the liturgical English version from the Hours (Agbia) of the Coptic Orthodox Church. Our Daily Life contains an abridged version of these prayers.

Quote
I'm still very much a baby in Orthodox understanding and practice!

Being a baby is not always so bad.  Wink

No indeed Smiley But it's very much a fish-out-of-water feeling when it comes to Orthodoxy.
Logged
Mystes
Pathomachos
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox Church
Posts: 17


One, Holy, Catholic, Apostolic Church


« Reply #63 on: June 09, 2014, 04:28:54 PM »

Hi all,

since I am new to Orthodox spirituality, I would very much like to know where I should stand with my daily prayer rule. Basically, I use the standard prayer rule as issued in prayerbook of the Russian Orthodox Church and my parish priest has confirmed that the prayers listed there should conform to 'a minimum standard' of our daily spiritual life, in other words, daily morning and evening prayers contained in the prayerbook should be regarded as the essential core. However, I'm struggling with a personal issue - I get back from work really late and the medication I have to take due to certain health issues makes me fatigued and dizzy, so by the time I get home I can hardly concentrate on the prayers. My question is whether it's okay to skip some of the prayers (without discarding them in any way 'unnecessary') leaving only 'the basics', i.e. The Trisagion Prayers, Prayer for the End of the Day, daily confession of sins etc. One other thought comes into mind as well - is it man to letter or letter to man? The latter expression seems to shed some light on my issue but I don't want to be too arbitrary in 'picking out' what may seem 'appropriate' in the prayerbook and what may not.
Logged

Ad majorem Adonai gloriam!
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15,506


In solidarity with Iraqi and Syrian Nazarenes


WWW
« Reply #64 on: June 09, 2014, 04:32:29 PM »

Hi all,

since I am new to Orthodox spirituality, I would very much like to know where I should stand with my daily prayer rule. Basically, I use the standard prayer rule as issued in prayerbook of the Russian Orthodox Church and my parish priest has confirmed that the prayers listed there should conform to 'a minimum standard' of our daily spiritual life, in other words, daily morning and evening prayers contained in the prayerbook should be regarded as the essential core. However, I'm struggling with a personal issue - I get back from work really late and the medication I have to take due to certain health issues makes me fatigued and dizzy, so by the time I get home I can hardly concentrate on the prayers. My question is whether it's okay to skip some of the prayers (without discarding them in any way 'unnecessary') leaving only 'the basics', i.e. The Trisagion Prayers, Prayer for the End of the Day, daily confession of sins etc.

Since you are speaking to your parish priest about these matters, I would ask him.  Personally, I don't see why it should be a problem.  Just explain to him your situation as you did here. 

Quote
One other thought comes into mind as well - is it man to letter or letter to man? The latter expression seems to shed some light on my issue but I don't want to be too arbitrary in 'picking out' what may seem 'appropriate' in the prayerbook and what may not.

The rule is for you, not you for the rule.  So again, talk to your priest and I'm sure he can help you figure out what you should "pick out" and what you should leave aside for now. 
Logged

Apolytikion, Tone 1, by Antonis

An eloquent crafter of divine posts
And an inheritor of the line of the Baptist
A righteous son of India
And a new apostle to the internet
O Holy Mor Ephrem,
Intercede for us, that our forum may be saved.


"Mor is a jerk." - kelly
CopticDeacon
ψάλτης (Psaltis) in the God-loving Diocese of NY and New England
Warned
Elder
*****
Offline Offline

Faith: Oriental Orthodox
Jurisdiction: Coptic Orthodox
Posts: 420


Abba Pachom, Pray for us!


« Reply #65 on: June 09, 2014, 04:40:10 PM »

St. Pachomius' prayer rule is awesome. takes 10-20 minutes depending on how many times you recite the Jesus Prayer. Start with a low number and reading scripture either before or after.
This is the prayer rule of St. Pachomius: http://www.saintjonah.org/services/stpachomius.htm
Logged

An Elder said "After one enters a perfume shop, upon leaving he will still smell of fragrant scents, even if he hasn't bought perfume. The same goes for one who spends time with holy men.  He will take upon the spiritual fragrance of their virtue."
icecreamsandwich
Likely perpetual neophyte
Member
***
Offline Offline

Faith: Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: OCA
Posts: 140



« Reply #66 on: June 09, 2014, 05:22:13 PM »

Hi all,

since I am new to Orthodox spirituality, I would very much like to know where I should stand with my daily prayer rule. Basically, I use the standard prayer rule as issued in prayerbook of the Russian Orthodox Church and my parish priest has confirmed that the prayers listed there should conform to 'a minimum standard' of our daily spiritual life, in other words, daily morning and evening prayers contained in the prayerbook should be regarded as the essential core. However, I'm struggling with a personal issue - I get back from work really late and the medication I have to take due to certain health issues makes me fatigued and dizzy, so by the time I get home I can hardly concentrate on the prayers. My question is whether it's okay to skip some of the prayers (without discarding them in any way 'unnecessary') leaving only 'the basics', i.e. The Trisagion Prayers, Prayer for the End of the Day, daily confession of sins etc. One other thought comes into mind as well - is it man to letter or letter to man? The latter expression seems to shed some light on my issue but I don't want to be too arbitrary in 'picking out' what may seem 'appropriate' in the prayerbook and what may not.

Welcome! As has been said above this is really a pastoral thing, so asking your priest would be the best bet. That said, it's often said that it's better to have a short rule that you actually keep, than a long rule that you struggle to follow and only keep like, parts of the week. Another really short and simple rule I like is that of St. Seraphim of Sarov:

http://www.stjohndc.org/Russian/fathers/FathersE/e_Prayer_Sarov.htm

Again, though, your priest will have the best asnwer for you and his advice would be best to follow.
Logged

Please correct me if I'm wrong - I'm still learning as I go along.
Mystes
Pathomachos
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox Church
Posts: 17


One, Holy, Catholic, Apostolic Church


« Reply #67 on: June 11, 2014, 03:32:39 PM »

I feel somewhat uneasy about 'adapting' prayer rules of others or even following prayer rules prescribed by certain monks or saints. My concern is that I trust the Church tradition reflected in the prayer rules outlined in prayer-books, it feels like improper to adjust them in any way, as if being afraid the prayers would lose their 'effectiveness' if they're supplanted, omitted or otherwise rearranged. I perfectly understand that prayer-books and prayer rules ar not magic formulae, after all, Christian prayer was the sort of practice that pushed away the pagan imperial recitations of prayers intended for the gods of the Roman state, but I still can't get rid of the feeling that making changes in the rule can be defective to spiritual life. Do any of you follow my meaning?
Logged

Ad majorem Adonai gloriam!
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15,506


In solidarity with Iraqi and Syrian Nazarenes


WWW
« Reply #68 on: June 11, 2014, 06:20:24 PM »

I feel somewhat uneasy about 'adapting' prayer rules of others or even following prayer rules prescribed by certain monks or saints. My concern is that I trust the Church tradition reflected in the prayer rules outlined in prayer-books, it feels like improper to adjust them in any way, as if being afraid the prayers would lose their 'effectiveness' if they're supplanted, omitted or otherwise rearranged. I perfectly understand that prayer-books and prayer rules ar not magic formulae, after all, Christian prayer was the sort of practice that pushed away the pagan imperial recitations of prayers intended for the gods of the Roman state, but I still can't get rid of the feeling that making changes in the rule can be defective to spiritual life. Do any of you follow my meaning?

I think I do, I feel that way at times myself.

You should talk to your priest.  The "rule" in a standard layman's prayer book is not the standard, it is a standard.  There are many variations through history and even among various traditions today, even though some things always remain the same.  If he tells you how to adapt it for your particular needs, just follow that adaptation as your rule, stick with it, and be at peace. 
Logged

Apolytikion, Tone 1, by Antonis

An eloquent crafter of divine posts
And an inheritor of the line of the Baptist
A righteous son of India
And a new apostle to the internet
O Holy Mor Ephrem,
Intercede for us, that our forum may be saved.


"Mor is a jerk." - kelly
WPM
St. Nicholas the Wonderworker, Pray for us.
Archon
********
Offline Offline

Posts: 2,165



« Reply #69 on: June 11, 2014, 11:46:44 PM »

I feel somewhat uneasy about 'adapting' prayer rules of others or even following prayer rules prescribed by certain monks or saints. My concern is that I trust the Church tradition reflected in the prayer rules outlined in prayer-books, it feels like improper to adjust them in any way, as if being afraid the prayers would lose their 'effectiveness' if they're supplanted, omitted or otherwise rearranged. I perfectly understand that prayer-books and prayer rules ar not magic formulae, after all, Christian prayer was the sort of practice that pushed away the pagan imperial recitations of prayers intended for the gods of the Roman state, but I still can't get rid of the feeling that making changes in the rule can be defective to spiritual life. Do any of you follow my meaning?

I think I do, I feel that way at times myself.

You should talk to your priest.  The "rule" in a standard layman's prayer book is not the standard, it is a standard.  There are many variations through history and even among various traditions today, even though some things always remain the same.  If he tells you how to adapt it for your particular needs, just follow that adaptation as your rule, stick with it, and be at peace. 

While it is ok to converse and talk with a legitimate priest ... I would rather do the guesswork myself and contribute to answering my own questions. If that's ok
Logged
Mor Ephrem
"Mor is right, you are wrong."
Section Moderator
Hoplitarches
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 15,506


In solidarity with Iraqi and Syrian Nazarenes


WWW
« Reply #70 on: June 12, 2014, 12:12:59 AM »

I feel somewhat uneasy about 'adapting' prayer rules of others or even following prayer rules prescribed by certain monks or saints. My concern is that I trust the Church tradition reflected in the prayer rules outlined in prayer-books, it feels like improper to adjust them in any way, as if being afraid the prayers would lose their 'effectiveness' if they're supplanted, omitted or otherwise rearranged. I perfectly understand that prayer-books and prayer rules ar not magic formulae, after all, Christian prayer was the sort of practice that pushed away the pagan imperial recitations of prayers intended for the gods of the Roman state, but I still can't get rid of the feeling that making changes in the rule can be defective to spiritual life. Do any of you follow my meaning?

I think I do, I feel that way at times myself.

You should talk to your priest.  The "rule" in a standard layman's prayer book is not the standard, it is a standard.  There are many variations through history and even among various traditions today, even though some things always remain the same.  If he tells you how to adapt it for your particular needs, just follow that adaptation as your rule, stick with it, and be at peace. 

While it is ok to converse and talk with a legitimate priest ... I would rather do the guesswork myself and contribute to answering my own questions. If that's ok

Whatever floats your boat, WPM!
Logged

Apolytikion, Tone 1, by Antonis

An eloquent crafter of divine posts
And an inheritor of the line of the Baptist
A righteous son of India
And a new apostle to the internet
O Holy Mor Ephrem,
Intercede for us, that our forum may be saved.


"Mor is a jerk." - kelly
littlepilgrim64
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Faith: Protestant seeker
Posts: 173



« Reply #71 on: June 12, 2014, 09:33:51 AM »

I feel somewhat uneasy about 'adapting' prayer rules of others or even following prayer rules prescribed by certain monks or saints. My concern is that I trust the Church tradition reflected in the prayer rules outlined in prayer-books, it feels like improper to adjust them in any way, as if being afraid the prayers would lose their 'effectiveness' if they're supplanted, omitted or otherwise rearranged. I perfectly understand that prayer-books and prayer rules ar not magic formulae, after all, Christian prayer was the sort of practice that pushed away the pagan imperial recitations of prayers intended for the gods of the Roman state, but I still can't get rid of the feeling that making changes in the rule can be defective to spiritual life. Do any of you follow my meaning?

I think I do, I feel that way at times myself.

You should talk to your priest.  The "rule" in a standard layman's prayer book is not the standard, it is a standard.  There are many variations through history and even among various traditions today, even though some things always remain the same.  If he tells you how to adapt it for your particular needs, just follow that adaptation as your rule, stick with it, and be at peace. 

As a newbie, I appreciate the variety there is available between a prayer book, the Psalter, daily Bible reading (I think there is a schedule outlined in the Orthodox Study Bible), going by the daily cycle of the church by referring to websites like:  http://www.goarch.org/chapel/, etc.  I would like to incorporate daily readings from the Psalter but when I refer to reading schedules as outlined at this website, for example:  http://churchmotherofgod.org/prayers-of-the-church/daily-readings-from-the-psalter.html (done on just a random web search), I look at it and turn my head to the side and go "What?"  Thankful that my priest is there to give me direction as to what is best for me at the stage I'm at now and can guide me further as I mature, with God's help.
Logged

"Do not cling with your heart to anything, and do not make it the god of your heart, for the sole God of our heart must be the Lord-God, Who created it: For our heart is His breath." ~ St. John of Kronstadt
Mystes
Pathomachos
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox Church
Posts: 17


One, Holy, Catholic, Apostolic Church


« Reply #72 on: June 12, 2014, 01:37:33 PM »

My parish priest is leaving on a two week vacation from Monday - just my luck!
Logged

Ad majorem Adonai gloriam!
Mystes
Pathomachos
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox Church
Posts: 17


One, Holy, Catholic, Apostolic Church


« Reply #73 on: June 12, 2014, 02:56:02 PM »

So what about the morning and evening prayers outlined in the Orthodox Study Bible? Are there any of you who follow them? If so, how do you find them 'fit' to your spiritual liking?
Logged

Ad majorem Adonai gloriam!
Mystes
Pathomachos
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Faith: Eastern Orthodox Christian
Jurisdiction: Russian Orthodox Church
Posts: 17


One, Holy, Catholic, Apostolic Church


« Reply #74 on: June 15, 2014, 11:48:20 AM »

Right, managed to speak with my parish priest today. Basically, he confirmed what he had told me previously, i.e. that our prayer-book contains the established norm of prayer for an Orthodox Christian, however, not in a manner that should be adhered to literally but selectively, striving to attain this standard rather than doing the whole thing at once. So, in a way, he allows for selection but still concludes that the wholeness of given prayers should be reached, as if perfected. He also added that evening prayers could be somewhat shorter choosing those more to one's spiritual liking, and perhaps adding some readings from Scripture. Another parish member advised me that no matter how much our attention dissipates or our mind wonders, keeping to the prayer rule at all times trains the mind regardless of losing concentration. Another thing worth mentioning is that our parish has our very own prayer-book in Lithuanian as we are probably the only Lithuanian-speaking parish of Orthodox believers in the whole of my country. Our prayer-book is modelled on that of the Russian Orthodox Church monastics (if I'm not mistaken), it was carefully translated and revised, so I'm kind of eager to keep 'in tune' with my fellow natives and parish members. I've even taken up singing in our church choir  angel
Logged

Ad majorem Adonai gloriam!
Tags: prayer 
Pages: 1 2 All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.246 seconds with 102 queries.