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Author Topic: St. Origen?  (Read 2601 times) Average Rating: 0
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Irenaeus
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« on: September 29, 2003, 12:35:09 AM »

Have any Christian communions canonically declared Origen a saint?
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Justinianus
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2003, 07:54:05 AM »

I do not think so, some of his writings were what the Egyptian priest Arius based his views on.  Of course these led to the whole heresy of Arianism.  It is not to say Origen is the origin of Arianism, but Arius' interpretation of some of the writings of Origen led him down the path to consider  the Son a creation of the Father at a point in time long ago and of less divinity than the Father.
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« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2003, 08:20:47 AM »

It's my understanding that Origen was condemned as a heretic at the FIFTH Ecumenical Council, but I can't recall the details.
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« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2003, 11:23:49 AM »

I do not think so, some of his writings were what the Egyptian priest Arius based his views on.  Of course these led to the whole heresy of Arianism.  It is not to say Origen is the origin of Arianism, but Arius' interpretation of some of the writings of Origen led him down the path to consider  the Son a creation of the Father at a point in time long ago and of less divinity than the Father.

Keep mind though, with that viewpoint, we shouldn't then consider Blessed Augustine a saint since the heretical views of predestination (especially Calvinistic) and irresistable grace were based on his writings to some extent - and we know that Augustine IS considered a saint by the Orthdox.

Btw, I'm reading The Role of Blessed Augustine in the Orthodox Church (or whatever it's called) by Fr. Seraphim Rose for the second time right now.  A very good read.
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« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2003, 03:52:30 PM »

Origen recanted, let's not defame a fellow orthodox who has been willing to embrace metanoia.  There were those who followed his Ideas who were heretics. One cannot deny his influence.
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« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2003, 05:00:06 PM »

I do not think so, some of his writings were what the Egyptian priest Arius based his views on.  Of course these led to the whole heresy of Arianism.  It is not to say Origen is the origin of Arianism, but Arius' interpretation of some of the writings of Origen led him down the path to consider  the Son a creation of the Father at a point in time long ago and of less divinity than the Father.

Keep mind though, with that viewpoint, we shouldn't then consider Blessed Augustine a saint since the heretical views of predestination (especially Calvinistic) and irresistable grace were based on his writings to some extent - and we know that Augustine IS considered a saint by the Orthdox.

Btw, I'm reading The Role of Blessed Augustine in the Orthodox Church (or whatever it's called) by Fr. Seraphim Rose for the second time right now.  A very good read.

I understand your point, but some of Origen's points were condemned by the 5th Ecumenical Council.  It could be that some in the Church at that time considered his ideas a more serious heresy than those of Augustine.  Augustine's percieved heresy could be one of interpretation and Origen's could be one more blatant or more directly against a Truth of the Church.  I am not saying that is the case, because I have not read much of either one, but it could explain why Augustine is a saint and Origen is not.
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« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2003, 11:06:28 PM »

Origen recanted, let's not defame a fellow orthodox who has been willing to embrace metanoia.

What evidence is there that Origen recanted of being condemned as a heretic several centuries after his death? Origen lived in the 2nd and 3rd centuries. Many of his teachings were declared anathema in the 6th century at the fifth Ecumenical council.

I don't know that there exists any text that suggests that Origen would have reason to believe that he ought to recant of anything.
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« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2003, 11:43:29 AM »

I do not think so, some of his writings were what the Egyptian priest Arius based his views on.  Of course these led to the whole heresy of Arianism.  It is not to say Origen is the origin of Arianism, but Arius' interpretation of some of the writings of Origen led him down the path to consider  the Son a creation of the Father at a point in time long ago and of less divinity than the Father.

Keep mind though, with that viewpoint, we shouldn't then consider Blessed Augustine a saint since the heretical views of predestination (especially Calvinistic) and irresistable grace were based on his writings to some extent - and we know that Augustine IS considered a saint by the Orthdox.

Btw, I'm reading The Role of Blessed Augustine in the Orthodox Church (or whatever it's called) by Fr. Seraphim Rose for the second time right now.  A very good read.

I understand your point, but some of Origen's points were condemned by the 5th Ecumenical Council.  It could be that some in the Church at that time considered his ideas a more serious heresy than those of Augustine.  Augustine's percieved heresy could be one of interpretation and Origen's could be one more blatant or more directly against a Truth of the Church.  I am not saying that is the case, because I have not read much of either one, but it could explain why Augustine is a saint and Origen is not.  

Origin was condemned as a heretic; Augustine was not.  Big difference.  The only thing Augustine was guilty of was overly-logical explanations of Grace and free will that were later falsely extrapolated on by others.  Augustine even realizes this possibility in some of his later writings.  Either read the book I mentioned or read the writings of some of his contemporaries (e.g. St. John Cassian, St. Vincent of Lerrins, etc.).  They were all very charitable with each other.
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Justinianus
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« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2003, 01:00:36 PM »


Origin was condemned as a heretic; Augustine was not.  Big difference.  The only thing Augustine was guilty of was overly-logical explanations of Grace and free will that were later falsely extrapolated on by others.  Augustine even realizes this possibility in some of his later writings.  Either read the book I mentioned or read the writings of some of his contemporaries (e.g. St. John Cassian, St. Vincent of Lerrins, etc.).  They were all very charitable with each other.

You are correct, that is why I was confused when you brought St. Augustine into the discussion. I do not see what his example has to do with Origen.  The question was about whether or not Origen was a saint.  I suppose St. Augustine can be discussed in another thread.
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« Reply #9 on: September 30, 2003, 01:12:44 PM »

I don't mean to detract from the conversation, or to discourage it, but it seems that the discussion is now discussing the merits of Origen and whether or not he was/is "canonisable", when the original post, I think, could be answered by simply consulting Church calendars.  Am I missing something?
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« Reply #10 on: September 30, 2003, 01:34:07 PM »

Justinianus,

My point was that Origen is not a saint because his theology was flat out heretical - not just because he was misunderstood (the Augustinian comparison), misinterpreted, extrapolated on, etc.  It was just a wondering - something to keep in mind as I put it.
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Hypo-Ortho
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« Reply #11 on: October 01, 2003, 07:22:18 AM »

I don't mean to detract from the conversation, or to discourage it, but it seems that the discussion is now discussing the merits of Origen and whether or not he was/is "canonisable", when the original post, I think, could be answered by simply consulting Church calendars.  Am I missing something?

Good point, Mor!!! Grin

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