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mike
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« on: January 29, 2009, 11:26:24 AM »

On orthodoxwiki there's written that in 1920s Church of Poland received several Old Catholic parishes and allowed them to use western rite. I tied to see the sourcelink but I wasn't allowed.

It's rather supricing for me and those who I asked. I only now about one parish in Wroclaw in 1960's but nothing about period between World Wars. Has anyone some info about this?
« Last Edit: January 29, 2009, 11:27:26 AM by mike » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2009, 09:33:47 AM »

Hi, Everyone!

Quote from: mike
Has anyone some info about this?
Sure thing, mike! Smiley

Western Orthodoxy in Poland

Following World War I the map of Eastern and Central Europe was largely redrawn following the principle of the self-determination of nations. The intense nationalism of the period also had its effect upon ecclesiastical life with the resultant secession of nationalist anti-papal churchmen from the Roman Church. The "Los von Rom" movements demanded certain reforms in the government of the local Church, participation of laity in administration, use of the vernacular in the services, abolition of clerical celibacy, and the like. Such a movement in Czechoslovakia at the beginning appeared to be like an.other Old Catholic movement. Very soon, however, two tendencies appeared. There was the majority radical-rationalist faction and a minority conservative, pro-Orthodox group. The latter group, headed by the Serb-consecrated Bishop Gorazd Pavlik joined the Orthodox Church while the larger body degenerated into Unitarianism. In the short interim period before having its Church life stabilized the pro-Orthodox party as, well as the radically-orientated faction used the Roman rite in the vernacular. After 1921 the Orthodox group adopted the Byzantine rite which, with the strong Cyrillo-Methodian tradition among the Czechs was, apparently, not difficult to do. The larger body continued using the Roman rite but with the parting of the ways of the two groups in 1924 any question of a Western rite Orthodoxy in the new Republic of Czechoslovakia could no longer be put.

The post-World War I period in Poland produced similar anti-papal and nationalist unrest within the Roman Church there. In the new Republic of Poland some of the antiRoman revolts exhibited strong Polish "Messianism." Besides the Marlavites an Old Catholic Church of Poland (not in communion with Utrecht) was formed. These two bodies united after World War II. The Polish National Catholic Church of America also started a Mission in Poland after World War I. Its first parish was organized in Cracow in 1923 and by 1939 this body numbered about 50,000 members with seventyfive parishes.

Still another secession from Rome took place in Poland in 1923 a group which desired the Mass in the vernacular. Headed by several former Roman Catholic priests the new body called itself the Polish Catholic National Church. The movement was met with powerful opposition from Roman Catholic authorities. It was forbidden them to erect any dioceses, build churches, or even publicly hold services. The organization was not legalized which meant that anyone married by its priests was not recognized as such. Disputes with the police and adherents of this Church frequently led to the spilling of blood. The movement originated in the industrial areas around Cracow and Dabrowa and spread among the inhabitants of Western Galicia, and in the southern part of the Lublin Province.

The Polish Catholic National Church in 1926 sought admission to the Church and came into contact with Metropolitan Dionysius of Warsaw who headed the Orthodox Church in Poland at that time. Father Andrew Huszno, the leader of the Poles, was invited along with other members of the body to attend the session of the Holy Synod held in Warsaw in the Summer of 1926. Father Huszno's proposals for uniting with the Church while retaining the Western rite were accepted and the terms of unity were discussed. The Holy Synod then referred the question to Patriarch Basil III of Constantinople and to several outstanding Russian hierarchs outside of Russia for their opinions. Together with Huszno several thousand Poles, mostly from Dabrowa Gornicza in the Kielce Province, had presented the Synod with a petition to be received into the Church.

In August, 1926 the "Conditions of Union of the Polish Catholic National Church with the Polish Orthodox" were made public. Officially the united Church was to be called the "Polish Orthodox National Church" but domestically and privately it could be called the "Polish Catholic National Church." The PKKN (initials of the body in Polish) was to accept all the dogmas held by the "undivided" Church before the schism of 1054; it accepted, the Nicean Creed and the whole body of Orthodox canon law; the Seven Sacraments; Communion under both kinds; it was to retain both public and private Confession; it retained the Western Liturgy in Polish with the necessary changes to make it conform with Orthodox doctrine; it kept the whole Western rite in Polish where it did not disagree with the Orthodox Faith; it retained clerical celibacy only for the episcopate; it was to receive Holy Chrism and the Antimins from the Metropolitan of Warsaw. It was agreed that Fr. Huszno would be consecrated head of the PKKN by the hierarchs of the Orthodox Church in Poland. Meanwhile he was appointed administrator of the Church. These "Conditions" were accepted for the Poles by the Priests Andrew Huszno and Jan Pietruszka who signed them with three lay delegates to a congress called for this purpose.

In a ceremony in Polish in the Eastern rite, Bishop Alexis of Grodno, on 8 August 1926, received Huszno and Pietruska into Orthodoxy in Warsaw. Other clergy were received later. Thereafter Metropolitan Dionysius appointed Fr. Huszno pastor of the church of St. Michael the Archangel in Dabrowa Gornicza. The size of the Western rite Orthodox Church was never very large, having at most six parishes with five priests. The Western Orthodox seem to have suffered considerably during World War II emerging with only one church intact. The Western Orthodox parishes apparently enjoyed considerable self-government in administrative matters.
The Polish Western rite parishes followed the Roman rite with only small changes in the liturgical texts' where dogmatic differences with Orthodoxy were expressed, e.g., the Filioque was removed from the Creed and references to works of supererogation were effaced. The Western calendar-style was followed, including the celebration of Pascha. The Septuagint was adopted for the Old Testament and for quotations therefrom in the liturgical texts. An epiclesis was added in the Mass after the prayer: Supplices te rogamus. The entire rite was in Polish. Generally speaking, the Western rite Orthodox were quite conservative in the changes made in the rite, preserving it very carefully. However, they did not consider it as finally established and left it fluid in the texts, ritual, and customs.


Source: http://www.westernorthodox.com/wohistory.htm

Also check out "Kościół Prawosławny w województwie lubelskim" ( http://sklep.cerkiew.pl/product_info.php?manufacturers_id=&products_id=1534 ), a book by Grzegorz Jacek Pelica. It has a few pages about Western rite parishes (chapter 3.3.1.: "Polski Narodowy Kościół Prawosławny").
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mike
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« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2009, 10:19:45 AM »

Hehe, dzięki.
Thanks.

Do you know why and when did they quit Church of Poland?
I also heard about two WR parishes after WWII. One in Hamburg (also former Old Catholic) and one in Wrocław. That in Germany quited the Church of Poland in 1990s but I don't know what happened to that in Wrocław (it was created in 1960s or something).

Tak przy okazji to skąd jesteś i jak znalazłeś to forum? Smiley
BTW where are you from and how did you find this forum?
« Last Edit: May 03, 2011, 10:20:56 AM by Michał Kalina » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2009, 11:31:24 AM »

I remember many moons ago, when the internet was young, asking the Western Rite Vicarate about why the Polish National Catholic weren't interested in WRO.  The Vicariate was perplexed too.  I wonder if things have changed, given the disarray of the Union of Utrecht now.
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« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2009, 03:06:39 PM »

Do you know why and when did they quit Church of Poland?
Around the time of WW2. There were many reasons: controversies around their leaders and things they were doing, inner conflicts, conflicts with other Polish Old Catholics and finally the war whith all confusion, uncertainty and genocide which it brought. You can read more here: http://www.kurier.wzz.org.pl/kz/kz164/9.shtml , http://www.kurier.wzz.org.pl/kz/kz166/8.shtml .

What I find hopeful is the fact that the Liturgy of St Gregory ( http://orthodoxwiki.org/Liturgy_of_St._Gregory_the_Great ) is probably still considered canonical by our hierarchs. That means that it could be used locally on some occasions, e.g. on St Gregory the Dialogist's feast day (12 March). It would be beautiful to restore Western rite use in Poland.

I also heard about two WR parishes after WWII. One in Hamburg (also former Old Catholic) and one in Wrocław. That in Germany quited the Church of Poland in 1990s but I don't know what happened to that in Wrocław (it was created in 1960s or something).
That's interesting. Any sources?

Tak przy okazji to skąd jesteś i jak znalazłeś to forum? :)BTW where are you from and how did you find this forum?
Odpowiem przez priva. Smiley
I'll answer via PM.

I remember many moons ago, when the internet was young, asking the Western Rite Vicarate about why the Polish National Catholic weren't interested in WRO.
What exactly where the reasons? Was it the WRV who gave the proposition or the PNCC asked first?
 
I wonder if things have changed, given the disarray of the Union of Utrecht now.
As far as I know, the PNCC (of US and Canada) resigned from th Union of Utrecht in 2003 and is now seeking full communion with Rome.

Translation added - MK.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2011, 10:22:10 AM by Michał Kalina » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2009, 03:37:55 PM »

I also heard about two WR parishes after WWII. One in Hamburg (also former Old Catholic) and one in Wrocław. That in Germany quited the Church of Poland in 1990s but I don't know what happened to that in Wrocław (it was created in 1960s or something).
That's interesting. Any sources?

In 1960's Polish Old-Catholics set up some parishes in Germany. In 1980s one of them switched to Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church. It was called Polnisch-orthodoxe Gemeinde der hl. Cyrillius und Methodius and it's adress was: Kirchhofstrasse 2
21035 Hamburg, tel: +49 40 7354895. It was even visited by archbishop of Łódź and Poznań Szymon. In 1990s, after reposing of it's first parish priest rev. Klaudiusz Perendyk it mysteriously left us. I don't know wether there are any Services and if yes - in which jurisdiction.

About the one in Wrocław I don't know anything more. One of my friends told me that there used to be WR parish in Wrocław in 1960s and that's all.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 03:40:55 PM by mike » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2009, 04:34:06 PM »

In 1960's Polish Old-Catholics set up some parishes in Germany. In 1980s one of them switched to Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church. It was called Polnisch-orthodoxe Gemeinde der hl. Cyrillius und Methodius and it's adress was: Kirchhofstrasse 2
21035 Hamburg, tel: +49 40 7354895. It was even visited by archbishop of Łódź and Poznań Szymon. In 1990s, after reposing of it's first parish priest rev. Klaudiusz Perendyk it mysteriously left us. I don't know wether there are any Services and if yes - in which jurisdiction.
I've just googled "Klaudiusz Perendyk" and found some information on him on Polish Wikipedia ( http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaudiusz_Perendyk ). In 1977 in Germany he set up the Polish Old Catholic Abroad with parishes in Hamburg, Bonn and Cologne. Interestingly enough, in 1984 the whole structure went under the jurisdiction of the (Nestorian) Assyrian Church of the East! After 1990, afraid of the possible consequences of his fraudulent conversion of funds, Perendyk committed suicide. The article didn't mention the Polish Autocephalous Orthodox Church at all. Weird...
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« Reply #7 on: February 19, 2009, 07:30:34 AM »

It was called Polnisch-orthodoxe Gemeinde der hl. Cyrillius und Methodius

I found out that today it is a multicultural, German-speaking, Byzantine rite parish under the Moscow Patriarchate run by a Kashubian priest. Smiley
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