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Author Topic: Question for our Slavic bretheren...  (Read 3257 times) Average Rating: 0
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Eugenio
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« on: December 31, 2008, 01:56:39 PM »

Here's a question for all of the Russians, Ukranians, Serbs, Bulgarians, etc.

How difficult is it for you to understand Old Church Slavonic? Is it completely alien? Or fairly easy to understand?

For comparison, the English language has changed a lot in the past thousand years. So it's impossible for me to understand Old English literature such as Beowulf. It's an entirely different language.

But by contrast, the Latin languages share a lot of commonalities, so I imagine it would be fairly easy for a Spanish or Italian speaker to learn Latin, or even understand bits and pieces without being formally educated in the language.

Which analogy is true for Church Slavonic vs. your language?
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« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2008, 02:12:01 PM »

Personally I understand approximately 70% of prayers, readings etc. Well it's completely different from Polish, but has many similarities to East-Slavic languages (Belarusian, Russian Ukrainian...). Luckily I know Belarusian fairly good and picked up a bit of Russian so it's easier to me.
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« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2008, 02:16:36 PM »

I guess I do not have much difficulty understanding it. I can understand most of the spoken or written message. Yet, I, never having been taught this language, cannot speak it. I mean, completely, totally unable - cannot construct even the simpliest sentence in it.

Ukrainians pray in modern vernacular Ukrainian, the same language we speak. I honestly do not understand why Rusians do not switch to their own beautiful, rich, expressive vernacular Russian. Beats me. If you ask me, it's just a prejudice, like wearing only a certain fashion of beards or pants.
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« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2008, 03:34:00 PM »

I didn't care for crkveno staro slovenski [old church slovanic]  when i was younger ..now that im a little older i don't mind it...it seem's pretty close to all the slavic languages....understandable to a point... 
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« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2008, 06:50:53 PM »

ГОСПОДЕ ГОСПОДЕ ПОГЛЕДАЈ ТВОЈ ВИНОГРАД (ТВОЈУ СВЕТУ ПРАВОСЛАВНУ ЦРКВУ) КОЈА ТВОЈА ДЕСНА РУКА ЈЕ ПОСАДИЛА.АМИН.

LORD LORD LOOK UPON THY VINYARD (THE HOLY ORTHODOX CHURCH) THAT THY RIGHT HAND HAS PLANTED.AMEN
I'll never forget the day after Liturgy when a peasant farmer, a seljak, came up to the bishop at the holy monastery of Zica and asked him if he produced good grappa from his vineyard!    It turned out, when I asked around, that quite a few people saw this prayer by the bishop as meaning a wish for a good grape harvest!!!!   Grin Shocked
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« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2008, 07:01:32 PM »

Another difficulty with understanding occurs with Serbian village people misunderstanding the term of address for a bishop -which is "Preosveceni."   Serbs use this in the way that Russians use "Vladyka."

But some of the village people get this confused with "prepeceni" which is used to mean alcohol (slivovica) which has been distilled or for bread which has been roasted or grilled.

So it is kind of amusing to hear a bishop addressed as "Prepeceni" rather as if he were a barrel of slivovica which had been put through the still!   Shocked
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« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2008, 09:44:52 PM »

Oce Blagoslovi...i allway used the word vladika and heard the serbs use vladika more for Bishop But now and then,  the word Preosveceni....when this new title came out serbs didn't care for it to much...they thought it was to arrogant or prideful..
 
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« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2008, 10:45:51 PM »

Oce Blagoslovi...i allway used the word vladika and heard the serbs use vladika more for Bishop But now and then,  the word Preosveceni....when this new title came out serbs didn't care for it to much...they thought it was to arrogant or prideful..
 
That is interesting. Must be different in different localities.   For us in the Zicka eparhija "Vladika" was a more formal title and equivalent to Bishop.   "Preosveceni" was a more familiar way of addressing the bishop and the one we used in everyday speech when speaking to him.
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« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2008, 11:11:01 PM »

Oce Blagoslovi...i allway used the word vladika and heard the serbs use vladika more for Bishop But now and then,  the word Preosveceni....when this new title came out serbs didn't care for it to much...they thought it was to arrogant or prideful..
 
That is interesting. Must be different in different localities.   For us in the Zicka eparhija "Vladika" was a more formal title and equivalent to Bishop.   "Preosveceni" was a more familiar way of addressing the bishop and the one we used in everyday speech when speaking to him.

Father...
If I remember correctly either in the late 1970 or 1980 here in the states the the title preosveceni came into existence for us to use...Before that allways Vladika for bishop...if they used preosveceni or presvecenstvo in the mother country more maybe ,i don't know...here there was a sermon on the new title use.. by a bishop...thats how i remember this new name..preosvecenstvo or preosveceni...this is the time when i heard the serbian people complain that the new title was pompus ,arrogant and prideful...Blagoslovi

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« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2008, 11:30:36 PM »

Dear Friends:

Church Slavonic is very difficult for those who did not grow up hearing it from childhood ( i.e. most contemporary Russians and Ukraininas). Church Slavonic is not just an "Old Russian", but a completely different language, more closely related tomodern Macedo-Bulgarian. The Slavonic language has entire conjugations of verb forms that do not occur in the East Slavic languages. Also the syntax of Church Slavonic is actually Greek, becasue many of the translations were word for word rather than paraphrased colloquially. While the elderly people I remember from childhood understood Slavonic, since they had heard it since *their* own childhoods. My step-mom, a WWII immigrant, has no comprehension of Slavonic at all. It's largely a generational thing, and one of those crazy traditions that can't be changed, because we *can't* change anything ? ! ?  I have sometimes wondered whether some people don't prefer the Liturgy in a language they can't understand. It makes them feel more "mystical" and all.

FF
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« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2008, 11:47:35 PM »

Dear Friends:

Church Slavonic is very difficult for those who did not grow up hearing it from childhood ( i.e. most contemporary Russians and Ukraininas). Church Slavonic is not just an "Old Russian", but a completely different language, more closely related tomodern Macedo-Bulgarian. The Slavonic language has entire conjugations of verb forms that do not occur in the East Slavic languages. Also the syntax of Church Slavonic is actually Greek, becasue many of the translations were word for word rather than paraphrased colloquially. While the elderly people I remember from childhood understood Slavonic, since they had heard it since *their* own childhoods. My step-mom, a WWII immigrant, has no comprehension of Slavonic at all. It's largely a generational thing, and one of those crazy traditions that can't be changed, because we *can't* change anything ? ! ?  I have sometimes wondered whether some people don't prefer the Liturgy in a language they can't understand. It makes them feel more "mystical" and all.

FF


Hello i thought it use to be the old balkan Church slovanic from the area you mentioned above ,,there's a thread some were on this forum ,that mentions that it changed to the russian version of old church slovanic,that everybody uses now...  
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« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2009, 02:30:39 AM »

Here's a wonderful parody by A.P. Chekhov on Church Slavonic. Smiley

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   Земская больница. За отсутствием доктора, уехавшего жениться, больных принимает фельдшер Курятин, толстый человек лет сорока, в поношенной чечунчовой жакетке и в истрепанных триковых брюках. На лице выражение чувства долга и приятности. Между указательным и средним пальцами левой руки -- сигара, распространяющая зловоние.
   В приемную входит дьячок Вонмигласов, высокий коренастый старик в коричневой рясе и с широким кожаным поясом. Правый глаз с бельмом и полузакрыт, на носу бородавка, похожая издали на большую муху. Секунду дьячок ищет глазами икону и, не найдя таковой, крестится на бутыль с карболовым раствором, потом вынимает из красного платочка просфору и с поклоном кладет ее перед фельдшером.
   -- А-а-а... мое вам! -- зевает фельдшер. -- С чем пожаловали?
   -- С воскресным днем вас, Сергей Кузьмич... К вашей милости... Истинно и правдиво в псалтыри сказано, извините: "Питие мое с плачем растворях". Сел намедни со старухой чай пить и -- ни боже мой, ни капельки, ни синь-порох, хоть ложись да помирай... Хлебнешь чуточку -- и силы моей нету! А кроме того, что в самом зубе, но и всю эту сторону... Так и ломит, так и ломит! В ухо отдает, извините, словно в нем гвоздик или другой какой предмет: так и стреляет, так и стреляет! огрешихом и беззаконновахом... Студными бо окалях душу грехми и в лености житие мое иждих... За грехи, Сергей Кузьмич, за грехи! Отец иерей после литургии упрекает: "Косноязычен ты, Ефим, и гугнив стал. Поешь, и ничего у тебя не разберешь". А какое, судите, тут пение, ежели рта раскрыть нельзя, все распухши, извините, и ночь не спавши...
   -- М-да... Садитесь... Раскройте рот!
   Вонмигласов садится и раскрывает рот.
   Курятин хмурится, глядит в рот и среди пожелтевших от времени и табаку зубов усматривает один зуб, украшенный зияющим дуплом.
   -- Отец диакон велели водку с хреном прикладывать -- не помогло. Гликерия Анисимовна, дай бог им здоровья, дали на руку ниточку носить с Афонской горы да велели теплым молоком зуб полоскать, а я, признаться, ниточку-то надел, а в отношении молока не соблюл: бога боюсь, пост...
   -- Предрассудок... (пауза). Вырвать его нужно, Ефим Михеич!
   -- Вам лучше знать, Сергей Кузьмич. На то вы и обучены, чтоб это дело понимать как оно есть, что вырвать, а что каплями или прочим чем... На то вы, благодетели, и поставлены, дай бог вам здоровья, чтоб мы за вас денно и нощно, отцы родные... по гроб жизни...
   -- Пустяки... -- скромничает фельдшер, подходя к шкапу и роясь в инструментах. -- Хирургия -- пустяки... Тут во всем привычка, твердость руки... Раз плюнуть... Намедни тоже, вот как и вы, приезжает в больницу помещик Александр Иваныч Египетский... Тоже с зубом... Человек образованный, обо всем расспрашивает, во все входит, как и что. Руку пожимает, по имени и отчеству... В Петербурге семь лет жил, всех профессоров перенюхал... Долго мы с ним тут... Христом-богом молит: вырвите вы мне его, Сергей Кузьмич! Отчего же не вырвать? Вырвать можно. Только тут понимать надо, без понятия нельзя... Зубы разные бывают. Один рвешь щипцами, другой козьей ножкой, третий ключом... Кому как.
   Фельдшер берет козью ножку, минуту смотрит на нее вопросительно, потом кладет и берет щипцы.
   -- Ну-с, раскройте рот пошире... -- говорит он, подходя с щипцами к дьячку. -- Сейчас мы его... тово... Раз плюнуть... Десну подрезать только... тракцию сделать по вертикальной оси... и все... (подрезывает десну) и все...
   -- Благодетели вы наши... Нам, дуракам, и невдомек, а вас господь просветил...
   -- Не рассуждайте, ежели у вас рот раскрыт... Этот легко рвать, а бывает так, что одни только корешки... Этот -- раз плюнуть... (накладывает щипцы). Постойте, не дергайтесь... Сидите неподвижно... В мгновение ока... (делает тракцию). Главное, чтоб поглубже взять (тянет)... чтоб коронка не сломалась...
   -- Отцы наши... Мать пресвятая... Ввв...
   -- Не тово... не тово... как его? Не хватайте руками! Пустите руки! (тянет). Сейчас... Вот, вот... Дело-то ведь не легкое...
   -- Отцы... радетели... (кричит). Ангелы! Ого-го... Да дергай же, дергай! Чего пять лет тянешь?
   -- Дело-то ведь... хирургия... Сразу нельзя... Вот, вот...
   Вонмигласов поднимает колени до локтей, шевелит пальцами, выпучивает глаза, прерывисто дышит... На багровом лице его выступает пот, на глазах слезы. Курятин сопит, топчется перед дьячком и тянет... Проходят мучительнейшие полминуты -- и щипцы срываются с зуба. Дьячок вскакивает и лезет пальцами в рот. Во рту нащупывает он зуб на старом месте.
   -- Тянул! -- говорит он плачущим и в то же время насмешливым голосом. -- Чтоб тебя так на том свете потянуло! Благодарим покорно! Коли не умеешь рвать, так не берись! Света божьего не вижу...
   -- А ты зачем руками хватаешь? -- сердится фельдшер. -- Я тяну, а ты мне под руку толкаешь и разные глупые слова... Дура!
   -- Сам ты дура!
   -- Ты думаешь, мужик, легко зуб-то рвать? Возьмись-ка! Это не то, что на колокольню полез да в колокола отбарабанил! (дразнит). "Не умеешь, не умеешь!" Скажи, какой указчик нашелся! Ишь ты... Господину Египетскому, Александру Иванычу, рвал, да и тот ничего, никаких слов... Человек почище тебя, а не хватал руками... Садись! Садись, тебе говорю!
   -- Света не вижу... Дай дух перевести... Ох! (садится). Не тяни только долго, а дергай. Ты не тяни, а дергай... Сразу!
   -- Учи ученого! Экий, господи, народ необразованный! Живи вот с этакими... очумеешь! Раскрой рот... (накладывает щипцы). Хирургия, брат, не шутка... Это не на клиросе читать... (делает тракцию). Подергайся... Зуб, выходит, застарелый, глубоко корни пустил... (тянет). Не шевелись... Так... так... Не шевелись... Ну, ну... (слышен хрустящий звук). Так и знал!
   Вонмигласов сидит минуту неподвижно, словно без чувств. Он ошеломлен... Глаза его тупо глядят в пространство, на бледном лице пот.
   -- Было б мне козьей ножкой... -- бормочет фельдшер. -- Этакая оказия!
   Придя в себя, дьячок сует в рот пальцы и на месте больного зуба находит два торчащих выступа.
   -- Парршивый черт... -- выговаривает он. -- Насажали вас здесь, иродов, на нашу погибель!
   -- Поругайся мне еще тут... -- бормочет фельдшер, кладя в шкап щипцы. -- Невежа... Мало тебя в бурсе березой потчевали... Господин Египетский. Александр Иваныч, в Петербурге лет семь жил... образованность... один костюм рублей сто стоит... да и то не ругался... А ты что за пава такая? Ништо тебе, не околеешь!
   Дьячок берет со стола свою просфору и, придерживая щеку рукой, уходит восвояси...

http://az.lib.ru/c/chehow_a_p/text_0030.shtml#14
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« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2009, 11:24:41 AM »

Dear Friends:

Church Slavonic is very difficult for those who did not grow up hearing it from childhood ( i.e. most contemporary Russians and Ukraininas). Church Slavonic is not just an "Old Russian", but a completely different language, more closely related tomodern Macedo-Bulgarian. The Slavonic language has entire conjugations of verb forms that do not occur in the East Slavic languages. Also the syntax of Church Slavonic is actually Greek, becasue many of the translations were word for word rather than paraphrased colloquially. While the elderly people I remember from childhood understood Slavonic, since they had heard it since *their* own childhoods. My step-mom, a WWII immigrant, has no comprehension of Slavonic at all. It's largely a generational thing, and one of those crazy traditions that can't be changed, because we *can't* change anything ? ! ?  I have sometimes wondered whether some people don't prefer the Liturgy in a language they can't understand. It makes them feel more "mystical" and all.

FF

I remember someone telling me that the readers hate the Gospel for the two Disciples on the Road to Emmaus: the passage has a lot of dual forms, which have died out in all the Slavic languages except Slovene.

As for mytical "feel."  Witness the Latin mass.

Arb. John of Chicago (OCA) of blessed memory, when a parishoner complained of that the English didn't have the same "warm feel right here [pointing to his chest]" as the "Old Russian [!]", vladika replied "yes, I get that same feeling after three vodkas."

Of course it lingers in Russia, as is the Russian adaption (recension) of Slavonic that has displaced the others.  Until the 19th, it was just seen as "High Russian" (e.g. Lomonosov).  It serves the same purpose in Russian that Latin and Greek do for English, and the peppering that French phrases do in English, and since Slavonic is closer to Russian, it reinforces that diglossia, as do other features of Russian (e.g. dropping of slurring of vowels, okanye and yekanye, in deliberate speech, a feature of Slavonic that it picked up when codified in Kiev, i.e. not Moscow).

To be fair, the ROC got its own Russian Bible almost two centuries ago, at the instigation of St. Filaret.
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« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2009, 01:37:06 PM »

and since Slavonic is closer to Russian, it reinforces that diglossia, as do other features of Russian (e.g. dropping of slurring of vowels, okanye and yekanye, in deliberate speech, a feature of Slavonic that it picked up when codified in Kiev, i.e. not Moscow).

I can't stand when priest reads Slavonic text as if it were Russian - changes o to a (akannye) or reads all г like 'g' in 'God'.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2009, 01:37:31 PM by mike » Logged
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« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2009, 03:29:04 PM »

Its sound normal to hear the G  [Г ] in Gospode [Господе] than this Hospode [Хосподе] i preferr the serbian,Macedonian,russian way..not sure about bulgarians though...though russia ukrainia,bulgaria's azbuka[alphabet]seems to be the same ...
« Last Edit: January 01, 2009, 03:38:31 PM by stashko » Logged

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« Reply #15 on: January 02, 2009, 12:34:49 AM »

The parish I grew up in does the Liturgy in 70% English, 30% modern Ukrainian. If I understand correctly, I believe in the late 70's the Ukrainians stopped using Church Slavonic in the Liturgy and went to Ukrainian. Some (only a few) UOC parishes have dropped the Ukrainian all together and do the Liturgy entirely in English.
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« Reply #16 on: January 02, 2009, 03:10:42 AM »

and since Slavonic is closer to Russian, it reinforces that diglossia, as do other features of Russian (e.g. dropping of slurring of vowels, okanye and yekanye, in deliberate speech, a feature of Slavonic that it picked up when codified in Kiev, i.e. not Moscow).

I can't stand when priest reads Slavonic text as if it were Russian - changes o to a (akannye) or reads all г like 'g' in 'God'.

Actually in Russia it's supposed to be pronounced "h" (it's a Ukrainism: the recension was fixed in the Byelorussian and Ukrainian speaking areas, which is why there is also supposed to be no slurring of vowels, and no devoicing of final letters).
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« Reply #17 on: January 02, 2009, 05:38:31 AM »

Its sound normal to hear the G  [Г ] in Gospode [Господе] than this Hospode [Хосподе] i preferr the serbian,Macedonian,russian way..not sure about bulgarians though...though russia ukrainia,bulgaria's azbuka[alphabet]seems to be the same ...

So is it a proper way? I always wanted to know, thanks stashko.
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« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2009, 09:01:59 AM »

and since Slavonic is closer to Russian, it reinforces that diglossia, as do other features of Russian (e.g. dropping of slurring of vowels, okanye and yekanye, in deliberate speech, a feature of Slavonic that it picked up when codified in Kiev, i.e. not Moscow).

I can't stand when priest reads Slavonic text as if it were Russian - changes o to a (akannye) or reads all г like 'g' in 'God'.

Actually in Russia it's supposed to be pronounced "h" (it's a Ukrainism: the recension was fixed in the Byelorussian and Ukrainian speaking areas, which is why there is also supposed to be no slurring of vowels, and no devoicing of final letters).

Correct. It's "halfway" between tough "g" and breathing "h." Sort of like X, but with voice. Xospodi. Also "Box," not "Bog." In Ukrainian, of course, it's Hospody and Boh.
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« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2009, 09:10:55 AM »

Dear Friends:

Church Slavonic is very difficult for those who did not grow up hearing it from childhood ( i.e. most contemporary Russians and Ukraininas). Church Slavonic is not just an "Old Russian", but a completely different language, more closely related tomodern Macedo-Bulgarian. The Slavonic language has entire conjugations of verb forms that do not occur in the East Slavic languages. Also the syntax of Church Slavonic is actually Greek, becasue many of the translations were word for word rather than paraphrased colloquially. While the elderly people I remember from childhood understood Slavonic, since they had heard it since *their* own childhoods. My step-mom, a WWII immigrant, has no comprehension of Slavonic at all. It's largely a generational thing, and one of those crazy traditions that can't be changed, because we *can't* change anything ? ! ?  I have sometimes wondered whether some people don't prefer the Liturgy in a language they can't understand. It makes them feel more "mystical" and all.

FF

Prot. Fr. Alexander Schmemann writes quite a lot about this in his Journals. There is a journal entry describing his visit to one small provincial US Carpatho-Rusyn parish in the early 1980-s, where there were mostly very old people. All of them were completely Anglophone, but they remembered certain gragments of the Divine Liturgy in Old Church Slavonic. One elderly lady "proudly" told Fr. Alexander that she does not understand at all what she is singing, but she does not care because that's how her ancestors worshipped.

In the Ukrainian (UOC-USA) Orthodox parish I went to when my family and I lived in Seattle (1991-1998, went there regularly in 1996-8), the priest spoke wonderful, accent-free, grammatic, idiomatic Ukrainian and so did almost all parishioners, old and new alike. Of course, the Divine Liturgy there always was in regular modern Ukrainian (just occasionally the priest would, after chanting a certain fragment of the DL, translate it into English, in case there were guests). It's so beautiful, and every word makes complete sense. I hope they will never switch to English.
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« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2009, 12:44:42 PM »


I once attended a Serbian church for Divine Liturgy.  The service was partly in Serbian, very little English, and hymns were mostly sung in Church Slavonic.  As a fluent speaker of Ukrainian, I understood very little Serbian, however, I did understand the Church Slavonic (enough to get the message that the words were portraying.)

Heorhij, I agree with you.  Having been raised in a Ukrainian speaking parish, I have found that the words have more meaning for me when said in Ukrainian.  Our parish does intersperse some English, but, overall, the services are in Ukrainian.

Just last week I was invited to an OCA church which celebrated Christmas on the 25th of December.  The entire service was in English.  I had attended Divine Liturgy at that particular church previously and the parish priest was aware that I was of Ukrainian heritage and attended a Ukrainian church.  After the service he came up to me and told me that he saw me during the Liturgy and had wondered what I was thinking.  He asked me if hearing the Divine Liturgy in English "felt" different to me then when I experience it in Ukrainian.  Well...standing in a church, and speaking to a priest, my initial instinct of being polite, politically correct and not hurting someone's feelings...only lasted a second.  I had to tell the truth.  So, I made a silly face and told him that honestly, while I understood everything in English, I also understand everything in Ukrainian, and the English did not have the same affect on me as did the Ukrainian.  The Ukrainian words sing.  They touch my soul and reverberate through my very being.  They bring tears to my eyes, and humility to my soul. 

I am sure this holds true for everyone, concerning their first language.  Nothing is as pleasing to each person as the sound of praises to God in the language they speak when they are with their closest friends and family. 

While I understand the need to "evangelize" and spread Orthodoxy, thereby, the need for use of more English in our churches...I still love to hear the Divine Liturgy in Ukrainian.  May it always be so!

Merry Christmas to all my Ukrainian brothers and sisters!  Merry Christmas to all who celebrate on the 7th of January!  Merry Christmas to all who have already celebrated!

May the good Lord bless all of you and watch over you in the coming year!  May you all know happiness, good health, peace, love and tolerance of others!

God bless!

Христос Родився!  Славимо Його!
Christos Rodivsya!  Slavimo Yoho!
Christ is born!  Glorify Him!



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« Reply #21 on: January 06, 2009, 04:45:12 PM »

МИР БОЖИЈИ, ХРИСТОС СЕ РОДИ...СЛАВИ ГА...ЈАНУВАР 7

MIR BOZIJI, HRISTOS SE RODI......SLAVI GA.....

GOD'S PEACE ,CHRIST IS BORN ....GLORIFY HIM...

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« Reply #22 on: January 06, 2009, 04:53:56 PM »

Дякую, пані Лізо і панe Cташку!

Христос Cя Рождає! Cлавімо Його!

Thank you! Christ is born, glorify Him!
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« Reply #23 on: January 06, 2009, 05:46:54 PM »

МИР БОЖИЈИ, ХРИСТОС СЕ РОДИ...СЛАВИ ГА...ЈАНУВАР 7

MIR BOZIJI, HRISTOS SE RODI......SLAVI GA.....

GOD'S PEACE ,CHRIST IS BORN ....GLORIFY HIM...

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My dear brother Stashko,

Happy Christmas to you! Sretan Bozic! Hristos se Rodi!
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« Reply #24 on: January 06, 2009, 07:27:10 PM »

МИР БОЖИЈИ, ХРИСТОС СЕ РОДИ...СЛАВИ ГА...ЈАНУВАР 7

MIR BOZIJI, HRISTOS SE RODI......SLAVI GA.....

GOD'S PEACE ,CHRIST IS BORN ....GLORIFY HIM...

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My dear brother Stashko,

Happy Christmas to you! Sretan Bozic! Hristos se Rodi!


HVALA BRATE..THEOPHILOS 78 AND BROTHER HEORHIJ AND EVEYBODY

ВОИСТИНY ХРИСТОС СЕ РОДИTRULY CHRIST IS BORN .GRANT  PEACE O LORD TO MANKIND AMEN..
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« Reply #25 on: January 06, 2009, 07:37:35 PM »

Дякую, пані Лізо і панe Cташку!

Христос Cя Рождає! Cлавімо Його!

Thank you! Christ is born, glorify Him!
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