Author Topic: Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy  (Read 183 times)

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Offline Asteriktos

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Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy
« on: August 23, 2018, 09:17:16 PM »
Have there ever been R.C. bishops with jurisdiction over religious orders, which might overlap with other bishops (similar to how there might be Latin and Eastern bishops in the same place)? Also, could clergy in religious orders be moved around as easily as (for lack of a better term) 'regular' clergy? Or would new placements need to take into account things like a religious order affiliation?

Offline Deacon Lance

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Re: Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2018, 09:44:49 PM »
Have there ever been R.C. bishops with jurisdiction over religious orders, which might overlap with other bishops (similar to how there might be Latin and Eastern bishops in the same place)? Also, could clergy in religious orders be moved around as easily as (for lack of a better term) 'regular' clergy? Or would new placements need to take into account things like a religious order affiliation?

Religious Orders, at least the big ones people are familiar with, are of Pontifical Right meaning the are exempt from the jurisdiction of the local bishop.  They may found their own parishes, less common today, or loan their priests out for use as pastors and parochial vicars by agreement between the religious superior and the local bishop.

Bishops can establish or approve religious institutes of Diocesan Right which they have jurisdiction over.

I would think it would be as easy to move them around as any priest, perhaps easier as provinces of religious orders are usually larger than dioceses geographically.
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Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2018, 09:48:44 PM »
Thanks!

Offline Sharbel

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Re: Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2018, 10:05:29 PM »
Have there ever been R.C. bishops with jurisdiction over religious orders, which might overlap with other bishops (similar to how there might be Latin and Eastern bishops in the same place)? Also, could clergy in religious orders be moved around as easily as (for lack of a better term) 'regular' clergy? Or would new placements need to take into account things like a religious order affiliation?
Dn. Lance did a good job addressing your 1st question, but I'm not sure about your 2nd question. 

A professed member of a religious order is moved at the pleasure of his or her superior, either immediate, like a prior or abbess, or remote, like a father general.  Still, always within the same order.  Moving between orders requires starting over from the beginning as a postulant.
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Offline Deacon Lance

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Re: Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2018, 10:08:51 PM »
Have there ever been R.C. bishops with jurisdiction over religious orders, which might overlap with other bishops (similar to how there might be Latin and Eastern bishops in the same place)? Also, could clergy in religious orders be moved around as easily as (for lack of a better term) 'regular' clergy? Or would new placements need to take into account things like a religious order affiliation?
Dn. Lance did a good job addressing your 1st question, but I'm not sure about your 2nd question. 

A professed member of a religious order is moved at the pleasure of his or her superior, either immediate, like a prior or abbess, or remote, like a father general.  Still, always within the same order.  Moving between orders requires starting over from the beginning as a postulant.

I took him to mean the geographical shell game done with abusers.
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Offline Sharbel

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Re: Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2018, 10:10:34 PM »
Dn. Lance did a good job addressing your 1st question, but I'm not sure about your 2nd question. 

A professed member of a religious order is moved at the pleasure of his or her superior, either immediate, like a prior or abbess, or remote, like a father general.  Still, always within the same order.  Moving between orders requires starting over from the beginning as a postulant.
I took him to mean the geographical shell game done with abusers.
If so, then count religious superiors guilty as charged.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2018, 10:10:47 PM by Sharbel »
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Offline Asteriktos

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Re: Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2018, 10:14:53 PM »
Fwiw I was just asking more generally. I was reading a short bit about 19th century missions in California, and they mentioned a bishop associated with a religious order, but I wasn't sure how it fit into the larger picture.

Offline Sharbel

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Re: Religious Orders and Catholic Clergy
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2018, 10:18:39 PM »
Fwiw I was just asking more generally. I was reading a short bit about 19th century missions in California, and they mentioned a bishop associated with a religious order, but I wasn't sure how it fit into the larger picture.
Some religious priests are called to become bishops, with the permission of their superior general, when they leave their communal life to serve a diocese.  For example, Card. O'Malley of Boston is a Franciscan Capuchin friar.  A handful of orders have traditionally refused this permission.
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