Author Topic: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home  (Read 2298 times)

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Offline Andrea

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Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« on: November 02, 2008, 12:14:54 PM »
I found out yesterday that my mother bought my 15 yo old son a book for Christmas and after reading the reviews of the book, I have some concerns.  It's called The Longest Trip Home by John Grogan. Has anyone by chance read this? If so, what did you think of it?  I'm concerned that the themes might not be appropriate for a 15 yo boy. 

Thanks!


Offline GabrieltheCelt

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2008, 07:57:08 PM »
After reading the synopsis of the book, I'd guess that some of the themes may not be appropriate reading for a 15yr old.  But I'd also say that most of the themes are being discussed by him and his friends; at least you can bet they're on his mind.
"The Scots-Irish; Brewed in Scotland, bottled in Ireland, uncorked in America."  ~Scots-Irish saying

Offline Andrea

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2008, 08:21:53 PM »
Hi! Thanks for the response, I appreciate it. I read a couple of reviews and also had the thought that it might not be appropriate for his age, though you bring up a good point about what he's probably thinking.   I think what I'm going to do is to try to check it out of the library and read it through.

Thanks!

Offline prodromas

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2008, 09:37:19 PM »
Hi! Thanks for the response, I appreciate it. I read a couple of reviews and also had the thought that it might not be appropriate for his age, though you bring up a good point about what he's probably thinking.   I think what I'm going to do is to try to check it out of the library and read it through.

Thanks!

I think it would depend. I think I would have been mature enough to understand it and for it to be appropriate. But yeah its you and your spouses decision on where you believe your sons spiritual and mature enough to grasp it and feel appropriate reading it.
The sins I don't commit are largely due to the weakness of my limbs.

1915-1923 Հայոց Ցեղասպանութիւն ,never again,
ܩܛܠܐ ܕܥܡܐ ܐܬܘܪܝܐ 1920-1914, never again,
השואה  1933-1945, never again,
(1914-1923) Ελληνική Γενοκτονία, never again

Offline tuesdayschild

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2008, 10:13:18 PM »
Reading it yourself is a good idea.  Reading it together with your son might open up a more adult level of discourse, one in which he both feels comfortable bringing up challenging topics and values your opinion.

But I'm betting that if he knows you are reading the book and that you want to discuss it with him, he'll never even look at the title page.  Too much like homework. 

So offering to read it together is a win-win.   ;)

Offline prodromas

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2008, 10:34:10 PM »
Reading it yourself is a good idea.  Reading it together with your son might open up a more adult level of discourse, one in which he both feels comfortable bringing up challenging topics and values your opinion.

But I'm betting that if he knows you are reading the book and that you want to discuss it with him, he'll never even look at the title page.  Too much like homework. 

So offering to read it together is a win-win.   ;)

I read the synopsis of the book and as a guy I would maybe want to discuss this stuff with my dad but could possibly be awkward with my mum and this is an assumption but the posters name sounds female. But again maybe American culture is different to Oz. 
The sins I don't commit are largely due to the weakness of my limbs.

1915-1923 Հայոց Ցեղասպանութիւն ,never again,
ܩܛܠܐ ܕܥܡܐ ܐܬܘܪܝܐ 1920-1914, never again,
השואה  1933-1945, never again,
(1914-1923) Ελληνική Γενοκτονία, never again

Offline John of the North

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2008, 10:40:26 PM »
Reading it yourself is a good idea.  Reading it together with your son might open up a more adult level of discourse, one in which he both feels comfortable bringing up challenging topics and values your opinion.

But I'm betting that if he knows you are reading the book and that you want to discuss it with him, he'll never even look at the title page.  Too much like homework. 

So offering to read it together is a win-win.   ;)

I read the synopsis of the book and as a guy I would maybe want to discuss this stuff with my dad but could possibly be awkward with my mum and this is an assumption but the posters name sounds female. But again maybe American culture is different to Oz. 

Or even a godfather perhaps....
"Christianity is not a philosophy, not a doctrine, but life." - Elder Sophrony (Sakharov)

Offline prodromas

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2008, 10:57:16 PM »
Reading it yourself is a good idea.  Reading it together with your son might open up a more adult level of discourse, one in which he both feels comfortable bringing up challenging topics and values your opinion.

But I'm betting that if he knows you are reading the book and that you want to discuss it with him, he'll never even look at the title page.  Too much like homework. 

So offering to read it together is a win-win.   ;)

I read the synopsis of the book and as a guy I would maybe want to discuss this stuff with my dad but could possibly be awkward with my mum and this is an assumption but the posters name sounds female. But again maybe American culture is different to Oz. 

Or even a godfather perhaps....

Well sadly the position of Godfather in the "Orthodoxy" I was brought up with is an honour title for your dad or mums best mate, not someone who will be there to help you with spiritual questions and struggles :D
The sins I don't commit are largely due to the weakness of my limbs.

1915-1923 Հայոց Ցեղասպանութիւն ,never again,
ܩܛܠܐ ܕܥܡܐ ܐܬܘܪܝܐ 1920-1914, never again,
השואה  1933-1945, never again,
(1914-1923) Ελληνική Γενοκτονία, never again

Offline Andrea

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2008, 01:22:38 PM »
Thank you all for your input on this, especially taking the time to look up the book.  You've given me some different perspectives on this, and I appreciate it! I hadn't thought of reading it with him, or having him read it/talk about it with his dad.

Thanks!

Offline tuesdayschild

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2008, 02:41:36 PM »
Reading it yourself is a good idea.  Reading it together with your son might open up a more adult level of discourse, one in which he both feels comfortable bringing up challenging topics and values your opinion.

But I'm betting that if he knows you are reading the book and that you want to discuss it with him, he'll never even look at the title page.  Too much like homework. 

So offering to read it together is a win-win.   ;)

I read the synopsis of the book and as a guy I would maybe want to discuss this stuff with my dad but could possibly be awkward with my mum and this is an assumption but the posters name sounds female. But again maybe American culture is different to Oz. 

It was not my intention to say that mother, as opposed to father, should discuss the book with son.  I was aiming more at the parent(s) should discuss it with his/her/their child(ren).  Sorry for the confusion.

Offline prodromas

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Re: Johh Grogan book, The Longest Trip Home
« Reply #10 on: November 05, 2008, 01:45:37 AM »
Reading it yourself is a good idea.  Reading it together with your son might open up a more adult level of discourse, one in which he both feels comfortable bringing up challenging topics and values your opinion.

But I'm betting that if he knows you are reading the book and that you want to discuss it with him, he'll never even look at the title page.  Too much like homework. 

So offering to read it together is a win-win.   ;)

I read the synopsis of the book and as a guy I would maybe want to discuss this stuff with my dad but could possibly be awkward with my mum and this is an assumption but the posters name sounds female. But again maybe American culture is different to Oz. 

It was not my intention to say that mother, as opposed to father, should discuss the book with son.  I was aiming more at the parent(s) should discuss it with his/her/their child(ren).  Sorry for the confusion.

Sorry about my inference :(
The sins I don't commit are largely due to the weakness of my limbs.

1915-1923 Հայոց Ցեղասպանութիւն ,never again,
ܩܛܠܐ ܕܥܡܐ ܐܬܘܪܝܐ 1920-1914, never again,
השואה  1933-1945, never again,
(1914-1923) Ελληνική Γενοκτονία, never again